Face It: You Just Might Have Pareidolia

Updated on December 30, 2017
Stephen C Barnes profile image

Stephen is an advertising sales executive for a magazine. He has experienced facial pareidolia for his entire life.

Facial Pareidolia

Pareidolia is a condition whereby one perceives familiar patterns in inanimate objects. One of the most common examples is seeing faces. This is known as facial pareidolia. Once thought to be the result of a mental illness or an overactive imagination, more recent research suggests that it may actually be a sign of a well-functioning brain.

The authors of a paper called "Seeing Jesus in Toast," which documents a study of facial pareidolia, put it this way: "The tendency to detect faces in ambiguous visual information is perhaps highly adaptive given the supreme importance of faces in our social life and the high cost resulting from failure to detect a true face."

It can be argued that once you start looking for faces in objects you start seeing them. For most people if someone points out a face that they see in an object, and it even remotely resembles a face, the other person will see it, too. Everyone readily identifies two circles with a slash below, such as with the happy face symbol, as a face.

This is not what it is like for a person with facial pareidolia, however. For a person with this condition, faces appear everywhere—in all manner of inanimate objects, in anything that has a pattern, in any play of light and shadow. They cannot help seeing faces. Most of the time they wish they could stop seeing them. I know, because I have had this condition my entire life.

Can you see the happy little guy smiling back at you from the fruit in pic number 1? How about the angry guy scowling at you with one eye closed in picture 2? or the face in the apple?
Can you see the happy little guy smiling back at you from the fruit in pic number 1? How about the angry guy scowling at you with one eye closed in picture 2? or the face in the apple? | Source
How about now?
How about now? | Source

Growing up with Facial Pareidolia

I have never seen the face of Jesus looking back at me from a slice of toast, nor Elvis in an oil slick in the driveway, but I have seen a lot of faces in a great deal of unusual places over the past fifty years or so.

I remember as a young child seeing faces in everything from the pattern in the tiles on the kitchen floor to the play of light and shadow on a wrinkled bed sheet. Faces like the ones in the bed sheet were, of course, temporary due to the fact that bed sheets were constantly moved and rearranged, and the position of light and shadow were always changing, but the faces like the one in the kitchen tiles were more or less permanent and became like friends to the young me who saw them everyday.

The one in the kitchen tiles I remember as resembling a small child that for some reason I recall as being around my own age even though I saw it over the course of several years and there is no way that it could have aged along with me. There were several others that I regularly saw around the house and actually looked forward to seeing, including my favorite, a crescent shaped face in profile that I called the man in the moon, that was formed by some slight damage to my bedroom wall, that I used to talk to on a regular bases. I considered these friends.

Along with these there were also some that I did not consider friends, and that actually scared me. There was one in particular that existed on the tile in our shower that just terrified me. He had long hair, a big nose, a large, bushy beard, and looked extremely angry and dangerous. This guy would be staring at me every time I took a bath. I used to hang a face cloth from the taps so that it dangled down and covered the menacing face.

For the most part though I enjoyed the company of these constant companions. I also learned early on to keep them to myself as I was the only one seeing them. I recall trying to point them out to my parents a couple of times but they thought there was something wrong with me and hoped I would grow out of it, which I quickly led them to believe I had. Given their reaction I choose not to share anything about it with my siblings.

A bank of dirty snow can yield an entire army of faces. How many can you see? I stopped marking them at 22, it was getting a little crowded.
A bank of dirty snow can yield an entire army of faces. How many can you see? I stopped marking them at 22, it was getting a little crowded. | Source
Source

Thanks a Lot, Charles Dickens

Then when I was about eight or nine years old everything about having facial pareidolia changed for me. It went from being a fun little secret that I had to something that terrified me. One Christmas Eve I was watching an old black and white version of a Christmas Carol on TV, the one with Alistair Sim, when I saw the face of the seven years dead Bob Marley materialize in Scrooge's door knocker. For the next few years after I thought that all these faces that I was seeing were ghosts that were for some reason sent to haunt me. It was a terrible and frightening experience. During this time I tried so very hard to stop seeing the faces but could not.

Sometime in my early teens I just stopped believing that these were other worldly beings sent for my reclamation and understood that, for some reason, I just had an uncanny ability to see faces. It stopped being frightening, though I was still startled from time to time when unexpectedly confronted by an unpleasant face in the steam on the bathroom mirror, or in the folds of my bedroom curtains at dusk. I actually began to enjoy it again. I didn't go back to thinking of them as friends or start talking to them again, but I did, and still do, like seeing them, even the occasional frightening ones.

A great number of vehicles appear to be either smiling or scowling at me as a drive past them. This one happens to be smiling.
A great number of vehicles appear to be either smiling or scowling at me as a drive past them. This one happens to be smiling. | Source
Can you see the regal looking gentleman in this piece of red maple?
Can you see the regal looking gentleman in this piece of red maple? | Source
For a person with facial pareidolia a set of window sheers can contain a legion of heavily mustached soldiers in funny helmets.
For a person with facial pareidolia a set of window sheers can contain a legion of heavily mustached soldiers in funny helmets. | Source
Source

The Man in The Mountain

Sometimes faces can be so obvious that everyone, even if it takes some pointing out for some, can see them. Such is the case with the "Man in the Mountain", a famous face in the cliff side just outside of Corner Brook, on Newfoundland's west coast. The old man looking down over the Humber River and the highway is something of a tourist attraction.

The first time I saw it I was 12 or 13 years old on a family vacation. My father pulled over in the little viewing area that was there so that we could all have a look. There were a number of other people there as well, everyone trying to see it. I could hear all sorts of comments: "Do you see it?" "No, do you?" "Where is it?" "Is that it?" "There it is, I see it." And on and on. I had only one question which I kept to myself: "Which of these faces do they mean?"

The Man in the Mountain, Corner Brook, Newfoundland.
The Man in the Mountain, Corner Brook, Newfoundland. | Source

To Share or Not to Share...

There were times over the years when I have been tempted to share, and point out to somebody else a face I was seeing, especially if I thought it was really easy to see or looked like someone familiar, but I always ended up deciding against it. Even though I have had this all my life it was only in the last few years that I found out that this condition has a name, and that many other people have it as well. Even with this knowledge I was reluctant to share. I guess the secret is out now.

There are a number of faces visible on this shower tile.
There are a number of faces visible on this shower tile. | Source
Source
Faces in a pattern on a ceramic floor tile. I see four others that I did not mark, can you see them?
Faces in a pattern on a ceramic floor tile. I see four others that I did not mark, can you see them? | Source
Source

Face It

Were you able to see many or even all of the faces in the pictures in this article without them being pointed out to you? Do you see faces in all sorts of places and patterns—in reflections, and in the play between light and shadow? There is a very good chance that you have facial pareidolia. You also now know that you are not alone. Not only do you not have to hide it, but you can now brag about it because it means that you are most likely in possession of a healthy and well-adapted brain.

Reference

Liu, Jiangang, et al. "Seeing Jesus in Toast: Neural and Behavioral Correlates of Face Pareidolia." Cortex. 2014 Apr; 53: 60–77.

Questions & Answers

    © 2017 Stephen Barnes

    Comments

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment

      • Stephen C Barnes profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephen Barnes 

        3 months ago from St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador

        Just about everyone does see faces in inanimate objects and random patterns. Out minds are geared for facial recognition. For those with facial pareidolia it is just much more intense. Where most people have to try hard to find the faces in the patterns, even when they are pointed out to them, those of us with facial pareidolia have to try hard not to see them. Recently pareidolia has become the subject of an exhibition at the Akron Museum of Art, called "Find A Face".

        On the other side of this phenomena is a condition known as facial agnosia, where by the sufferer has no facial recognition. They cannot even recognize the faces of family and loved ones. Some cannot even recognize their own faces.

      • RedElf profile image

        RedElf 

        3 months ago from Canada

        I thought everyone saw faces... didn't think it was a condition, though. As a child, I saw scary faces in the bathroom tile (mottled pattern). I try not to see them there now because it's very hard to un-see them once you notice them. Glad to know it's a sign of a healthily functioning brain. And car faces are just fun - even the scowly ones :)

      • Stephen C Barnes profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephen Barnes 

        6 months ago from St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador

        That's great, thanks. I will add the image to the article shortly.

      • profile image

        Ron Senack 

        6 months ago

        Was having problems with the email it wasn't showing were to send it. So I left the bark image on your face book. If there is a different image that you would like to post let me know and I will send a copy, thanks.

      • Stephen C Barnes profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephen Barnes 

        6 months ago from St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador

        Hi Ron. Thanks for your comments. I checked out your facebook page, your pictures are fascinating. I am now a follower. If you want to send along a pic you can email me directly from the contact author link at the top of this article. I would love to add one or two of your pictures to this piece.

      • Stephen C Barnes profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephen Barnes 

        11 months ago from St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador

        This is more common then most people think, as we are built to recognizes faces, but for some of us, like yourself, we see them everywhere. It's not so bad once you get use to it though, and knowing now that it is a sign of a strong, healthy brain makes even easier to live with.

      • profile image

        jocelyn 

        11 months ago

        I have experienced facial pareidolia for my entire life...I can see a face or an object everywhere, on the wall, in the wood, in the fabric, in the cloud, etc....

      • Stephen C Barnes profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephen Barnes 

        13 months ago from St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador

        The upside maria, you're never alone.

      • profile image

        Maria Gorman 

        13 months ago

        Ineed help im seeing faces

      • Stephen C Barnes profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephen Barnes 

        15 months ago from St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador

        Thank you Mary. I had never heard of the term myself until a few years ago, nor was I aware that it was a known and documented condition. It's nice to know but not really important to me at this stage of my life. Sure would have been nice to have this information 40 years ago though.

      • Blond Logic profile image

        Mary Wickison 

        15 months ago from Brazil

        I had never heard the term before or known that this occurred.

        Of course, there are a few like the lights and grilles on cars which are easy to see. I know there use to be a set of tiles in the UK which looked like a chicken. Or Artex on the ceiling.

        I can see where this could have been problematic growing up.

        I would say it is a highly active brain function. Similar to how artists can see details others can't.

        Fascinating article.

      • Stephen C Barnes profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephen Barnes 

        15 months ago from St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador

        Thank you Rogers, I'm pleased that you found it informative.

      • Rogers Olare profile image

        Rogers Olare 

        15 months ago

        This article is so educative. I must admit that before I read this post, I had no idea what Pareidolia was. Thanks to your article.

      working

      This website uses cookies

      As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, healdove.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

      For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://healdove.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

      Show Details
      Necessary
      HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
      LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
      Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
      AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
      Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
      CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
      Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
      Features
      Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
      Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
      Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
      Marketing
      Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
      Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
      Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
      Statistics
      Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
      ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)