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Ten Things I Wish My Doctor Told Me About Chemotherapy

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What to Bring to Chemo:

  • iPod with your favorite music
  • Kindle with a variety of books that you enjoy and make you laugh
  • Pictures of people that love and support you
  • Warm socks
  • Favorite magazines
  • Lotion for your hands and feet
  • Cards and gifts from family and friends to open
  • ANYTHING DISTRACTING to prevent boredom
  • A good friend for support and to make the time go faster

There is no real way to describe the shock and fear I felt when I learned I had Ovarian Cancer. After a first and second opinion at Yale and Sloan Kettering coupled with my own research, I realized that chemotherapy was the best way for me to proceed (followed by my own comprehensive plan to build a bionic immune system). My doctor gave me little information regarding the side effects of chemotherapy, instead expecting me to formulate my own questions. In my state of shock and fear and with no knowledge whatsoever about chemotherapy I was supposed to think of questions?? Really??

Somehow I found the courage to show up to my first chemotherapy session at Sloan Kettering. It was in the middle of possibly one of the worst snowstorms ever in New York, so I had to stay overnight in New York City. Many people rescheduled so there were more nurses than patients for my first time, which never happened again at Sloan Kettering. The nurse was kind and told me not to be nervous, but the one thing my doctor had told me was that some people can have a negative reaction to the chemo (though she assured me they could handle it). Soon I was hooked up to the IV, desperately hoping I wouldn't have a negative reaction (which I didn't). While I was thinking I could still run and never come back, I was finally handed a pamphlet with a list of all the possible short-term and long-term side effects of my chemotherapy. I don't know how they expected me to process the information at that time! I finally read it over the next few days at home, but found that there weren't any practical tips to get through my treatment.

I managed to get through all six chemo sessions over 3 1/2 months without any permanent side effects, and without missing any scheduled sessions due to short-term issues. However, I spent all this time frantically trying to catch up on my research to minimize the risks and side effects. My focus now is on strengthening my immune system but I would like to share some tips that I hope can help someone else:

Eat numerous vegetables after chemo to rebuild your immune system.
Eat numerous vegetables after chemo to rebuild your immune system. | Source

1. Avoid raw fish and vegetables. Chemotherapy can decrease your body's ability to fight even everyday bacteria, so avoid raw fish, uncooked vegetables, fruits without a peel. soft cheeses, and undercooked meat or eggs. Cooked vegetables are fine.

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2. Be aware of the side effects of steroids. Steroids (usually used to prevent a reaction to the chemotherapy) can make you feel crazy. It took two cycles for me to discover that withdrawal from the steroids was causing me to feel extreme irritability and suicidal depression, sometimes simultaneously. If you feel any crazy emotions, discuss them with your doctor. My doctor lowered my dosage, which reduced some of the withdrawal sympatoms.

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3.Use a safe mouthwash. I used Biotene mouthwash many times a day and brushed and flossed regularly. Biotene is specially formulated to reduce "dry mouth". It is important to minimize any bacteria in the mouth to avoid mouth sores, which can be extremely painful and difficult to heal during chemo.

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4. Consider fasting. Side effects result when chemotherapy kills healthy cells along with the cancer cells. After my first session, I found a study indicating that fasting before, during, and after chemotherapy can reduce the effects of chemo on healthy cells, without reducing it's effectiveness against cancer cells. The basic idea is that healthy, normal cells listen to your body's instructions to slow down growth due to the fasting, but cancer cells continue growing normally. Even now the results of the study are not yet released, but research is still being conducted at the Mayo Clinic. My doctor advised against fasting, mainly because studies had not been completed, but I did it anyway. I feel like fasting was one of the main reasons I got through my treatment without any serious side effects (other than hair loss). Some more research is discussed here: Benefits of Fasting During Chemotherapy.

Exposure to numerous germs during chemo can be risky. There will still be many fun events to attend when chemo is over.
Exposure to numerous germs during chemo can be risky. There will still be many fun events to attend when chemo is over. | Source

5. Avoid public places. Avoid public places as much as possible, especially doctors' offices and places with large crowds. When I did go out in public I brought Purell along as my new best friend. This happened in the middle of one of the worst winters I could recall, and during the cold and flu season. I took this very seriously and stayed home a lot - yes, at times it got extremely boring. The biggest challenge was not getting near the kids when they were sick. Fortunately my husband was able to work at home any time the children needed to be taken care of.

Research the foods that can help you compensate for any nutrients that are depleted during chemo.
Research the foods that can help you compensate for any nutrients that are depleted during chemo. | Source

6. Compensate for nutritional deficiencies. Find out what nutritional deficiencies can result from your type of chemotherapy, and research what foods can be used to compensate. For example, my type of chemotherapy resulted in the loss of magnesium so I ate spinach, beans, and nuts to compensate. I also was terrified of neuropathy because a high percentage of people got this on a tempoary or permanent basis. I ate foods rich in Vitamin B and protein such as beans, chicken, and whole grain bread to compensate. I heard nurses giving people bags of magnesium at the end of treatment if their blood tests showed they were depleted, but I always tested fine in my magnesium levels. I never once heard a doctor or a nurse advising the patients to supplement their diet, which I never understood. Why not at least inform people of food choices that might be beneficial and let them decide?

Only allow those that are sincere and will be a real benefit to you on your team during chemo.
Only allow those that are sincere and will be a real benefit to you on your team during chemo. | Source

7. Accept help. Don't hesitate to accept help when friends offer, but make sure it is help that will be beneficial for you. I turned down some offers that would have been more of an effort for me than a benefit. This isn't the time to worry about offending people or following society's rules. This is a time to focus on your health and safety, so you can ultimately be there for those that you care about.

Any type of exercise such as walking will help fight the fatigue that chemo can cause.
Any type of exercise such as walking will help fight the fatigue that chemo can cause. | Source

8. Exercise! Try to exercise to minimize fatigue. Exercise can be a walk with a friend or yoga at home. Before chemotherapy I was able to bench press more than my body weight and do more pull ups than many guys (not to brag!) but after my surgery and during treatment I could barely do any extercise, and could only work out for 20 minutes. It is important to lower your expectations and accept that some exercise is better than none, rather than having unrealistic goals.

9. Use a cold cap. Consider using Cold Caps to avoid hair loss. They work on a similar philosophy to fasting, basically by slowing down the growth of hair follicles to they don't absorb the chemicals during treatment. They were still very new, and not approved by my doctor at the time I went through treatment. Furthermore, I didn't hear about them until after my first session, so it would have been too late for me to save my hair. But recently I have noticed brochures in the doctors' offices.

Don't be pressured to buy a wig during the consultation. Go before you lose your hair so you can think about it and shop around.
Don't be pressured to buy a wig during the consultation. Go before you lose your hair so you can think about it and shop around. | Source

10. Buy only one wig. Take a friend or spouse with you when shopping for a wig and buy it before you lose your hair. Buy only one wig so you have time to see if you will use it at all. Don't be manipulated by people who want to make money knowing you are in shock and vulnerable.



I have a law degree, not a medical degree - so always check with your doctor before making any medical decisions (but don't blindly trust your doctor either). Always remember that the doctors, friends, and support system you select to help you through chemotherapy are your team: you are the team leader so ultimately any decisions are yours to make. If you or someone you love is going through chemotherapy my heart goes out to you and I hope this helps. Cheers to good health!!

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Comments 252 comments

NC4Life078 profile image

NC4Life078 4 years ago from United States of America

This is the most informative hub I've read on Hub Pages. Luckily, I know no one with cancer as of right now. But, I am glad that I am now armed with the knowledge to better serve myself and others when the time comes.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@ NC4Life078..Thank you so much for the kind words! I'm glad you haven't had to deal with anyone going through cancer because it is very difficult to deal with but appreciate you took the time to read this in case you ever need it.


NC4Life078 profile image

NC4Life078 4 years ago from United States of America

1 in 3 people will get cancer in their lifetime. I would be ignorant to think that I will not have to deal with it in my life time. In fact, I see myself as already having cancer. Once I have come to that realization I am more capable of dealing with it when the time comes.


cloverleaffarm profile image

cloverleaffarm 4 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

This is loaded with great information. You are so right about the doctors. They don't tell you anything about the nutritional side of anything. They set you up for chemo, and move on to the next patient. Probably, because they aren't taught the nutrition side of things. Thank you for sharing it all. Voted up, and shared!


CyberShelley profile image

CyberShelley 4 years ago

Hello, I have been the companion to two friends who had aggressive chemo, and another who is having 'black' chemo. All three of them liked wine gums - a hardish type of jelly baby sweet. Said it took the taste away. Someone else I know, who is cancer free now, has been eating a handful of almonds everyday for six years as they help the body to fight cancer. Wish you well and all strength to you! Voted up and interesting. Will follow as well!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@CyberShelley...The wine gums is a great tip. I also ate a handful of almonds every day during chemotherapy and continue to do so. I eat the organic raw almonds. Thanks for the comment and so awesome that you are there for your friends!


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

I have had several good friends who have survived cancer treatments and we have also lost good friends to cancer. Hearing what has helped you on a first hand basis will hopefully help many others who will get this disease sometime in their lifetime. Thank you! Hope that the worst is behind you and there to stay. Voted up, useful, interesting and will share with my followers.


unknown spy profile image

unknown spy 4 years ago from Neverland - where children never grow up.

This is one great, useful hub about chemo that we should all be aware.. this is not only for people who's doing chemo but also everybody so as when we encounter someone, or a friend we can really help them even in just the simplest way.


urmilashukla23 profile image

urmilashukla23 4 years ago from Rancho Cucamonga,CA, USA

Thanks for the helpful tips about chemotherapy to help the others in need. You are so brave and inspirational. Take care. Voted up!


RTalloni profile image

RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

This needs to be highlighted many times over with comments, votes, shares, links in emails to friends and by everything else it can be legally shared.

Having helped relatives and friends during chemo treatments I can validate that the doctors and nurses do not give helpful information that they could give. Perhaps they are uniformed, but honestly, that is no excuse.

Form your own questions? About something you know nothing about? At a time when you are stunned and And/or ask them of people who don't give significant information they could give?

I'm so glad you posted this. I was so excited to read it that I almost forgot to compliment you on a well-done hub with important information in a concise, easy to read format that will be a help to many people. Your 10 tips stand alone as important, and they are also a springboard not only to your other hubs but to their bigger search for information that will help them in their specific circumstances.


mary615 profile image

mary615 4 years ago from Florida

I am going through mental anquish right now because one of my granddaughters has a very low white count and has to have a bone marrow biopsy. As a former lab tech I almost know what she has. If so she will probably be put on chemo. I do so dread it.

I'm so happy you are doing well, and hope you continue to get well.

Thanks for writing this. I voted it UP and will share.


CassyLu1981 profile image

CassyLu1981 4 years ago from Spring Lake, NC

My 16 year old cousin has fought his battle with leukiema and is now back at home and doing good. Down to 1 doctor visit a week! I couldn't even imagine everything that he had gone through. I have a new found respect for those who fight and go through chemo. Thoughts and prayers go out to you all always! Thanks for Sharing!


phdast7 profile image

phdast7 4 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

Wonderful Hub. Glad you are doing well. And I cannot thank you enough for sharing information that may help many people who end up undergoing chemotherapy. All kinds of votes and Sharing.


Mommiegee profile image

Mommiegee 4 years ago from Alabama

This is a great article. Thank you so much for sharing your experiences. I will definitely be sharing your article in hopes of helping someone else going through the same thing. I'm glad you're doing well.


Barbara Kay profile image

Barbara Kay 4 years ago from USA

This is good advice and interesting to read, but I hope I never need it. Thanks.


JayeWisdom profile image

JayeWisdom 4 years ago from Deep South, USA

This is a terrific, super-informative hub, and you are so thoughtful to share it with others (especially since some doctors apparently do not realize they should tell chemo patients what to expect).

I haven't needed chemo and hope I never do, but I take other treatments in a facility where people are having chemo in the same room. Some of the patients look extremely tired and stressed, and my heart goes out to them. I am going to share the link to your hub with the clinic's office manager and ask her to give it to any new chemo patient.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@Peggy W..Thank you for the kind words. I am now feeling great and hope this article will make the cancer journey a little easier for those that will follow me.

@Unknown Spy..Thank you! It helps so much if friends know what a cancer patient is actually experiencing when they are helping out.

@Urmilashukla23...Thank you for the kind words!

@RTalloni...Chemotherapy is difficult but possible. It's incomprehensible that the medical profession doesn't make it a little easier for patients by providing them with a simple pamphlet. It's very generous of you to support others going through chemo. Thanks you so much for your useful and supportive comment.

@Mary615..My thoughts and prayers go out to you and your granddaughter. It's great that they now have drugs which can prevent people from feeling nauseous and work for most people.

@Phdast7...Thank you so much! I hope this helps other people that will be forced to go down this road.

@Mommiegee...Thank you for the comment and for taking the time to read this.

@Barbara Kay..Thank you and hope you never have to go through chemo!

@JayeWisdom...I'm glad you have never had to experience chemo! I appreciate you sharing this information with the manager at the clinic! I hope others that are forced to go down this path won't have to learn from trial and error and do a significant amount of research when they are already in the middle of a crazy,stressful time.


Don Bobbitt profile image

Don Bobbitt 4 years ago from Ruskin Florida

Voted UP, Useful, Awesome and Interesting. I appreciate everything you said in this well laid out Hub. I am even sharing it with my followers.

I had a rare form of Kidney failure years ago and for a six-week period they put me on weekly Chemo (IV-version) in an attempt to break down the scar tissue on what was left of my Kidney.

Anyway, I can appreciate your warnings, especially the one a bout steroids that I end up on ove 200 mg of for over 4 years. I WAS A CRAZY MAN during that time.

Anyway, Great Hub!


ComfortB profile image

ComfortB 4 years ago from Bonaire, GA, USA

This is a great article coming from your personal experience and observation. Very well written, and no doubt will help someone in similar situation.

Thanks for sharing. Voted Up and Useful.


Marcy Goodfleisch profile image

Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

My thanks to you for sharing such a personal and sensitive experience. So many people face this type of treatment (either themselves, or with a family member), and it's very important to know what chemotherapy is like for those who experience it. I truly hope you are doing well and that your body has responded in all the best ways possible.


Earthy Mother profile image

Earthy Mother 4 years ago from Southeast England

This is really interesting with regards to your research into foods...I did unfortunately become neutropenic and was hospitalised just last week following my last chemo...my kids had colds and I caught it and ended up with a sinus infection that my body could obviously not fight off...needless to say it was a terrible, traumatic time, but had I thought more about which vitamins my body needed, like you, perhaps I could've avoided this. Enjoying your hubs and you've made me think a bit more about what we expose our bodies too! xx


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@ComfortB...Thanks for the comment!

@Marcy Goodfleisch..Thank you for taking the time to read this and for the kind words!

@Earthy Mother..I'm so sorry you had to go through that!! People say it is so scary and hearing these experiences prompted me to find a way to minimize the risk. I'm glad you made it through and congrats on finishing your last chemo!! Sending hugs!


joymk profile image

joymk 4 years ago from Michigan

Fantastic information. I pray that non of us ever needs it but I am thankful for the information none the less. Praying for continued health for you and those who are battling this disease. :-)


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@Don Bobbit...I think crazy is an understatement. My husband took a fraction of the steroid dosage for a respiratory infection. He couldn't sleep much for three nights and he is twice my weight. What I felt was off the charts and so glad not to be on them.Glad you are doing well!

@Joymk...Thank you so much for the comment and the good wishes!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@CassyLu1981...Glad your cousin is home and doing well. Yes..chemo is a challenge to go through! Thanks for you support!


billybuc profile image

billybuc 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

A wonderful hub my friend! I'm still looking for word on the state of your cancer....full remission? I certainly hope so! Thank you for your words of courage; I'm sure this is a great help to those who have to experience this.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thank you for your kind comment and positive energy billybuc.! I couldn't rest until I wrote this hub and hope it helps people that are going through chemotherapy or will go through it in the future. I am officially in remission and enjoying life and working every day to build my immune system so that it is stronger than it ever was. Thanks for asking!


billybuc profile image

billybuc 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

That is just fantastic! I am so happy for you!


dwachira profile image

dwachira 4 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

When just situations arise, we just wish we could have all the information we need, it would save us a lot. Great article, voted up, useful and shared.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

dwachira.....So much of our own research is required when it comes to health but hope my experience can help others. Thanks so much for your time reading this and kind comment!


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

This is a great resourceful hub. I wish that I'd asked my doctor more about chemo than what I did. Those cold caps look like a great idea. Do you know if they work?

Voting +++ and sharing.


KenWu profile image

KenWu 4 years ago from Malaysia

I'm sorry to hear about your medical condition. I hope and pray that you will be getting better and regaining a perfect health.

God bless,

And voting your hub all the way UP and press all buttons except 'funny' :)

Again God bless.....


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Just Ask Susan...They definitely work for some women! They still need more data to determine the safety of using them so many doctors are reluctant to approve them. Other countries have been using them for a while. They can be challenging to use because the patient has to bring their own freezer and supply of cold caps and a helper has to put a new one on every 30 minutes so it remains at the correct temperature. They are now coming up with a machine that the cap can be hooked up to so it remains at the right temperature. I hope they are approved for use because hair loss can be such a difficult side effect emotionally and can possible be avoided in many cases.Thanks so much for taking the time to read this and for sharing!!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

KenWu...Thank you so much for the good wishes!! I am feeling much better and focusing on eating a healthy diet and just relaxing! Thank you for taking the time to comment and read this!


BlissfulWriter profile image

BlissfulWriter 4 years ago

Leafy green vegetables are great because of their magnesium and B vitamin. Although coconut water has good natural magnesium as well.

Cruciferous vegetables, mushrooms, onions, and garlic have anticancer properties.

I saw this YouTube video lecture of Dr. Donald Abrams talking about nutrition and cancer...

http://youtu.be/zeZFcIbwCZg


Mr. Happy profile image

Mr. Happy 4 years ago from Toronto, Canada

I am happy You made it through. I wish You strength and Power!

All the best! : )


dahoglund profile image

dahoglund 4 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

I was fortunate with chemotherapy in that it was uncomfortable but i did not get real sick like some have told me. I did not live in a crowded place like New York, so those problems were minimal. I did have a doctor who had a big ego(according to what I overheard from nurses) and if the chemo was'st working right it seemed to be that patients fault.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

BlissfulWriter...Thanks so much for the helpful comment! I have leafy green and cruciferous vegetables daily now. I also appreciate the link to the video and find it interesting that Dr. Abrams starts out by saying that it is rare for an oncologist to talk about nutrition and that they don't really teach nutrition in medical school when it is so vital to good health and for recovery and disease prevention.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Mr. Happy...Thank you so much for your support and kind words!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

I'm glad you didn't get sick during chemotherapy. They have some drugs that came out just in the last five years that help most people. During chemotherapy it is convenient not to live in a crowded area because there are germs everywhere and people in public don't know to be careful. It's unfortunate there are doctors with a big ego during a time when people need true compassion. My surgeon was compassionate and had a great sense of humor but my oncologist during chemo was very moody and seemed to take her frustration out on her patients at times...that's why it's good to have your own support system! Thanks for the comment and hope you are doing well!!


Etherealenigma profile image

Etherealenigma 4 years ago from Florida

I'm more of a naturalist, so I would never encourage people towards chemotherapy because I know how badly it tears up the body. It's total poison. However, what I liked about your article is that you asked the right questions. Why weren't the doctors telling you what nutritional choices you could make to ease the symptoms? It's because this is a money maker for them.

The chemical companies control big pharm, the majority of the agricultural community, the food industry, the medical colleges, and the doctors, who often get kickbacks for recommending what they produce.

They poison us with the chemicals they spray on the produce. They poison us with the chemicals they implant in the seeds so that they only can produce one crop. They have the food industry using chemicals to pasturize and process natural food into something unnatural, cheap and instant for shelf life, as well as for profit, without any regard to our health.

Then, they shuffle us, once we get sick from it, into the medical industry, who they have taught & paid to prescribe more chemicals for us to allegedly make us well, or give us some sort of chemical treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy, thereby shoving more poisons and toxins into our already overburdened systems.

So in answer to your question...the goal of most in the chemical medical profession is not to cure anything or anyone, but only to halt (temporarily) the symptoms that cause discomfort or pain. They aren't going to advise anyone of the right things to do to fully recover their health, because they haven't been taught that. They've been educated to poison us even more. They know that most people will simply trust in the person with the title...of "doctor," and never research what's happening to them to find the truth for themselves. Most people are simply too lazy to invest in themselves in that manner, and are more willing due to their laziness, to simply take the doctor's word that the treatment they prescribe is the best, safest, and, in some cases, most natural approach.

I really think that if someone was going to choose to do chemotherapy, you just gave them tips on the most informed way to do it, which is great. While I still don't agree with that methodology, I love the fact that you stated that no one should just simply trust their doctor's word either. Two thumbs up! GB


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Etherealenigma..I so much appreciate your honesty and very thoughtful comment. The purpose of this article is to do everything in my power to help those that have made the choice to go through chemotherapy. It is not to persuade anyone to follow any particular treatment because each individual has to make that decision for themselves based upon the information available to them.

I was one of those people that believed in the natural approach and still do. I refused to even take an asprin for a headache. I always questioned the advice of doctors and did my own research and continued to do so throughout my experience.My husband and I did extensive research including reading medical journals in a relatively short time frame. I agree that there are many people that have healed themselves naturally but also many people that have healed from modern medicine. There are also others that have not survived from both approaches.

I also agree our bodies are bombarded with toxins from our food and environment and it takes enormous effort to minimize this exposure. I think doctors should present alternative medicine as an equally valid option. I think it is great that you would use natural methods to heal if you were in the same situation and completely respect your perspective. However, I was just saying to my husband today that I wonder if those that oppose chemotherapy have really been faced with the choice. I think people can't be sure of the decision they would make until they are actually in the situation.

Thanks so much for taking the time to read this and giving a helpful perspective!!


Lovelovemeloveme profile image

Lovelovemeloveme 4 years ago from Cindee's Land

Useful and inspirational. Best wishes and regards to u. U go girl!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Appreciate your comment and support!!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Lovelovemeloveme...Thanks so much for stopping by and your support and good wishes!!


meloncauli profile image

meloncauli 4 years ago from UK

Great hub. Very informative and useful.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thanks for the comment meloncauli!


yeagerinvestments profile image

yeagerinvestments 4 years ago from Wisconsin

Great tips. I wish I would have known some of these before my sister in law started her treatments.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

yeagerinvestments..I had to do a lot of my own research and hope to make the road a little easier for those that follow. Thanks for taking the time to read and comment and wish your sister in law strength for the journey.


innerspin profile image

innerspin 4 years ago from uk

An inspired hub, so well written and packed with useful tips and information. It's quite shocking that you had to find all this out for yourself at such a difficult time. Your strong character shines through. Thank you for your work.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thank you so much for the kind words innerspin! I did have to learn a lot in the midst of a stressful situation but hope this helps someone else.


GClark profile image

GClark 4 years ago from United States

Interesting article with good advice. I would advise anyone with a cancer diagnosis to get several opinions plus research your options. Been there - done that! There are other choices such as endocrine therapy or enzyme therapy that are very effective for certain types of cancer and they don't destroy healthy cells. Develop a questioning mind plus focus on building up your immune system.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

GClark...Thank you for the comment and I hope this information is helpful to others! I completely agree that several opinions is vital since this is a serious illness and each person has to be their own advocate. There are many options that are offered through alternative medicine and those should be considered as well. It would be so helpful if those statistics were published to help people make an informed decision. I agree people should always ask questions and never blindly follow a doctor for any medical issue. Thank you so much for adding the information about endocrine and enzyme therapy.


carol7777 profile image

carol7777 4 years ago from Arizona

Thank you for sharing all this. So many people going through chemotherapy have not a clue. They should all read this. Excellent. and I am voting UP.


tirelesstraveler profile image

tirelesstraveler 4 years ago from California

How I wish we could have chatted before you went through chemo. The amount of information given a patient spans such a broad spectrum I can't believe it. When I started my second go round I was part of a clinical trial. The information I got from the trial nurse was amazing. I notice different nurses give much more information than others.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@carol7777...I didn't know anything until I went through it and did my own extensive research. I hope this makes it a little easier for those that go through it or are supporting others going through it. Thanks so much for the visit and the vote!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

I really wish we could have chatted too tirelesstraveler! None of my friends had ever been through anything like this and I didn't tell many people. I think it would have been helpful for the hospital to have an introductory class or give out a "welcome to chemo" packet with information. Sounds like you had a great nurse and they all should be like that. Thanks for reading and commenting!


peachpower profile image

peachpower 4 years ago from Florida

I would like to add to your information about Biotene. The thing with chemo is that some of the drugs are very targeted, meaning they will seek out the cancer cells to destroy. Some types of chemotherapies are NOT targeted, meaning healthy cells will be destroyed along with the cancerous cells.

The usual area for this side effect to occur is in the mouth, because the epithelial cells that line the mouth/throat/GI tract replicate rapidly; as do cancer cells. This makes stomatitis (inflammation/breakdown of the oral mucous membranes) or xerostomia (dry mouth) very common, very painful occurrences.

I believe it is vital to your post to explain that Biotene contains no alcohol and that is why it is advised as a mouthwash for patients undergoing chemotherapy. Were you (or anyone else) to have used Listerine or another alcohol containing mouthwash; there would be additional damage- as well as horrible pain- which would be caused by the alcohol in the mouthwash.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@peachpower...Thanks so much for adding the reasoning behind the recommended use for Biotene in some cases. The chemotherapy I had was not targeted. Although I was fortunate to only experience mouth sores after my first chemo session I heard many stories where people ended up in the hospital as a result of infections in the entire digestive tract. It was after that first session my research began to make it a little easier to get through chemo and minimize side effects. Thanks so much for mentioning the danger and pain that mouthwashes containing alcohol can cause during chemotherapy.Your visit and comment is very much appreciated!


KellyMediaBest profile image

KellyMediaBest 4 years ago from Tampa, Florida

Great hub. Its very enlightening to hear first hand experience and tips from someone who has gone through the process of chemotherapy and genuinely wants to help others. Its vital to get 2nd and third opinions, and then know the right questions to ask when facing something as serious as this.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@KellyMediaBest...First hand experience is the best teacher! I hope this helps someone else by giving them a little more information to enable them to ask the right questions to make an informed decision. With a serious medical issue more than one medical opinion is wise coupled with your own research. Thanks for taking the time to read this and comment!


peachpower profile image

peachpower 4 years ago from Florida

I loved reading the Hub. You had some very good, very valid points. I was saddened when I came to the part about you not getting the necessary education as far as nutrition, side effects, etc. That must have left you feeling very alone. I'm sorry that happened to you.

Were you on a platin (oxaliplatin/carboplatin/cisplatin) chemo? I know those are worse for neuropathy than any other.

You are an inspiration, and thank you for sharing your story.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@peachpower...Thank you so much for your empathy and kind words. It means so much! I took carboplatin and it seemed the majority of the people that took the drug had either temporary or permanent neuropathy. I did feel very much alone but in a way that drove me to find ways to prevent some of the difficult side effects. I think a class,helpful handout, or a person on 24 hour call that deals specifically with chemotherapy would be so helpful. Thank you so much for your comment!


rituu123 profile image

rituu123 4 years ago from Mumbai

Great hub, very inspirational , more power to you girl. Vote Up.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@rituu123...Thank you so much for your kind words and support! I appreciate your visit and hope to see you again!


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

Up votes and sharing this information again because there may be more people who need to read this now who might have missed it earlier. Thanks for sharing your first hand experience with us.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thanks so much for the votes and share Peggy W! I hope this helps many people. Your kindness and support is so much appreciated!


FreezeFrame34 profile image

FreezeFrame34 4 years ago from Charleston SC

Thank you for writing this and thanks to Peggy W for sharing so I could read it! Great hub and useful information!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@FreezeFrame34...Thank you so much for taking the time to read and comment. I hope this information can help those going through chemotherapy or those supporting others going through it.


freecampingaussie profile image

freecampingaussie 4 years ago from Southern Spain

A very informative hub, Thank you for sharing and I will share it on facebook as I know someone right now going thru chemo .


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@freecampingaussie...I hope your friend finds this useful. Thank you so much for taking the time to read and comment. My goal is to help others learn from my experience and hopefully have an easier time. I really appreciate you sharing this information on facebook!


Debby Bruck profile image

Debby Bruck 4 years ago

Dear Healthy Life ~ I pray you have survived your ordeal through the cancer experience and now live life to the fullest with joy. You have contributed much needed information. I will leave some notes from my own experience over a decade ago. I barely even think about cancer now and have forgotten a considerable amount of the trauma and pain. As to your list. . .

1. Avoid raw fish and vegetables: I normally do not eat raw fish, but craving salads and plenty of fresh fruits, especially berries which I think many people do when you need nourishment and lots of fiber to remove all the toxins and wastes from the body. Constipation can be a side effect of chemo.

2. Be aware of the side effects of steroids. I usually asked for less drugs. You can always get more, but whatever you can do to lessen the impact on the body's hormone system, if this is an option.

3.Use a safe mouthwash. This did not seem to be a problem, I recall. Maintaining healthy gums and teeth, which connects to heart health must be a primary concern. I used to massage my gums to stimulate the blood flow.

4. Consider fasting. Quite an interesting theory. Everything that I was told and advised revolved around keeping up your appetite, which you can become nauseas and have no desire to eat during treatment, goes against this concept. I was told to gulp down those protein drinks and bulk up the calories. I think I took them for a little bit. I did lose a lot of weight. I wonder whether it would have been good for me to fast, because I would have faded away to a skeleton.

5. Avoid public places. Its very easy to become paranoid about catching bugs and illness during this phase when your entire immune system is wiped out. Stay clear of folks coughing, sneezing and hacking.

6. Compensate for nutritional deficiencies. During my treatments I was a strict vegan and ate lots of brazil nuts (selenium) and other nuts, fruits, vegetables and soups, plus lots of supplements.

7. Accept help. Not only accept, but ask and have someone head up a committee with many volunteers to bring meals and help with kids and around the house, plus take to and from sessions.

8. Exercise! Super. Yoga, qigong, walks, weightlifting or whatever you like.

9. Use a cold cap. Geez. Would this help me? I lost all the hair on my entire body. Just like a newborn babe.

I pray that less people have the cancer diagnosis, that we clean up our environment, that preventative medicine through lifestyle changes will be our future.

Many blessings, Debby


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@Debby...I'm so happy to hear that you are in good health and barely think about cancer any more. I really appreciate the fact that you took the time to leave such an insightful comment based upon your own experience! This also gives me the opportunity to clarify a few points.

3.The purpose of the mouthwash is to eliminate bacteria to reduce the risk of infection which can be highly dangerous to those that have a compromised immune system. It sounds like you had amazing nutrition that definitely helped with overall health including keeping your gums and teeth healthy.

4.The fasting is an interesting theory that may help reduce side effects which would help so many. The theory is still being tested and I agree that patients must receive input from their doctor to make sure it's safe. In the last five years some amazing anti-nausea drugs have been approved and help many people. I never felt sick during the entire experience. The steroids increase appetite and weight gain is now a huge issue for many people.

5.I think being a little paranoid about public places is a good idea when the chemotherapy results in a low white cell count and a compromised immune system. There are people that underestimate the risk and lose their life from an infection that progressed too quickly. Many others have to deal with a life threatening infection in the middle of everything else.

6. The cold caps are a great invention and work for a percentage of the people with certain types of chemotherapy. Hair can take years to grow back to what is was and is a daily reminder of the trauma. I lost all my hair too. They require someone to switch the caps every thirty minutes because they have to remain at a very specific temperature. They are now coming up with new ones that can be hooked up to a machine that keeps it at the correct temperature. I hope one day all hospitals carry these.

I agree completely that we need to clean up our environment and I hope one day cancer is no longer a reality! Thanks you so much for the visit and I hope to see you again!


SommerDalton profile image

SommerDalton 4 years ago

This is so informative, I love it. Beautiful and useful as well. Good luck to you and wishes on 100%cancer free!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@SommerDalton...Thank you for your kind comment and good wishes! I hope this helps many people.


Cathy Fidelibus profile image

Cathy Fidelibus 4 years ago from NJ

Do you have any advice for someone going through radiation. My friend has just had her first treatment and does not know what to expect, she is worried and scared.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@Cathy...I didn't go through radiation so don't have any personal experience and didn't research the topic. There are many organizations that allow you to speak directly with someone that has actually gone through it. I know how scary it is to go through a new type of medical treatment. It's good to find out about other people's experiences and how they handled any difficult issues. However,each person responds differently to all treatments so your friend will have to take it one day at a time. If any difficult issues arise try to find ways to make it better and don't assume the answers you get from the medical profession or elsewhere are the only answers.I wish your friend all the best and glad you are available to provide support. If I can help in any way with any information regarding cancer treatment let me know.


Cathy Fidelibus profile image

Cathy Fidelibus 4 years ago from NJ

Thanks so much for your advice.


2patricias profile image

2patricias 4 years ago from Sussex by the Sea

This hub was especially interesting because my husband has recently completed a course of chemo that stretched over 8 months. He was on a drug trial, so we went to the hospital every week. This had many benefits, mostly because we both felt so very well looked after.

We both worked very hard on maintaining his immune system, including the mouth wash and careful diet.

Two tips that might help others:

I have never before had a flu shot, but discussed this with my own doctor as well as my husband's medical team, and decided it would be worth while.

I massaged his feet with moisturising cream every night. We started this mostly because it felt good, but also because we thought it might prevent neuropathy. The unexpected benefit was that it kept the skin on his feet in very good condition. The hospital staff said that sometimes chemo patients loose some of the feeling in their feet (due to neuropathy) and then pick up little cuts which can easily become infected.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@2patricias..Good to hear that you were both well looked after during the experience and that your husband has completed chemo. I appreciate the addition of the two helpful tips. My husband and children had a flu shot and I had my first flu shot ever before beginning chemo. It is definitely something the whole family should research.

Neuropathy is common with many types of chemo and very good point that not only can walking be a challenge but people may not be aware of small cuts and and any cuts can lead to infections when the immune system is compromised. Any time I got even a paper cut I used a topical antibiotic and band aid during the time. Thank you so much for the helpful comment and I wish you and your husband the best!


Ethan Green profile image

Ethan Green 4 years ago from England

Great hub, and I could not agree more. When I went through chemo in the UK last year, it was the steroids that caused me one of the biggest daily problems. Waking up every night around 3am and unable to get back to sleep, but still feeling tired, put me in a very strange combination of being alert but exhausted at the same time. And did anyone warn me that the steroids would cause even more side effects alongside the chemo drugs? Nope!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Alert and exhausted describes my state exactly during chemo! The doctors wanted to give me drugs to help me sleep which had even more crazy side effects according to my research so I declined. The steroids made me feel emotions I've never felt in my life and they didn't warn me either. Many people don't have the bandwidth to research during such an emotionally and physically challenging time so full disclosure would be so helpful. Thanks so much for your comment!


snoblet profile image

snoblet 4 years ago from New York

reading what happens in chemo is pretty scary especially when you walk into something unknowingly because of the lack of info that is giving. this is very informative and it's something i hope that others or myself would not need to use, i'm glad you're better now.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@snoblet...Chemo is really scary especially the first time. Knowledge is power and helps to minimize fear so I hope my experience helps others. I hope you will never need to use this but most people at some point during their life will know someone else going through chemo and this may help them provide support to that person. Thank you so much for your comment!


carozy profile image

carozy 4 years ago from San Francisco

I found this hub very helpful and interesting. I'm glad you are doing better. Thank you for sharing this info, I'm sure it will help others in that same situation.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thank you so much for your kind words carozy! I wrote this to help others with the wish that it will make a very stressful time a little easier. Thank you so much for taking the time to read this.


CriticalMessage profile image

CriticalMessage 4 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

May you continue to persevere to endure... I know what chemo is... Your strength, beauty, and spirit deserves to, needs to persevere to endure... Because we weaker people?, need you..


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@CriticalMessage...Thank you so much for your kind words! Chemo is a challenge and I would just look at my children for motivation during the times I wanted to give up. It means so much! Thanks for the visit and hope to see you again!


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 4 years ago from sunny Florida

hi healthy life 2 I am glad for you that you survived your chemo experiences. And that you have shared the tips as well that should be helpful to others.

i for one can tell you if i ever receive any diagnosis that requires chemo I will not be having any thank you. I have watched for the better part of nine years as my daughter has been ravaged by cancer that has spread from one part of her body to the next rapidly, not to mention all of the damage to her major organs from it.

so if i get the diagnosis they can cut out whatever it is or just let it run its course. i watched as my daughter was assaulted over and over and over from the legalized poison that coursed through her veins. the old saying about that which does not kill thee makes the stronger was not true in this case. it make her weaker and more vulnerable.

so for those who have cancer after cancer the chemo is a gamble. what has kept her on the planet is an extreme will to live and a LOT of prayers.

i have written about our journey

http://hubpages.com/health/When-Catastrophic-Illne...

The link above is to the first part of that journey. Sending Angels to you . ps


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@pstraubie48...I do hope this article helps others that find themselves going through chemotherapy. I'm so sorry your daughter has suffered so much and will keep her in my thoughts and prayers.There is no question that chemo weakens the body and sometimes is the lesser of two evils but it isn't always an easy choice. I believe the will to live and the human spirit have a big impact.I will definitely read about your journey together. Thanks so much for taking the time to read this and for your kindness!


kashmir56 profile image

kashmir56 4 years ago from Massachusetts

Thanks for this very informative and beautifully written hub . Glad to hear your cancer is in remission......awesome !

Vote up and more !!!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thanks so much for your kind words Kashmir56! I hope this information can help others that find themselves going through chemotherapy.Have an awesome weekend!


alphagirl profile image

alphagirl 4 years ago from USA

This was extremely helpful. I think we all want to believe that doctors know all but they don't. Everyone's body reacts so differently to medicine, esp. chemo. The healthiest of bodies can deteriorate quickly after chemo. Doctors always misdiagnose. My sister-inlaw went in for a lack of breath and they said it was allergies. She never smoked, taught tai chi. She actually had lung cancer, stage 4. Nothing prepared them.

They immediately gave her radiation, but like chemo it kills your organ cells good and bad like chemo. They trusted their doctors. It was one of the most aggressive lung cells. She suffered 5.5 months. As soon as she got the first treatment, it wiped her out. So sad. I wrote a hub/poem about her experience. The Helen Gee Scholarship fun was created in honor of her sudden death. Thanks for sharing your research and being so open about your own experience. I wish you well and hope you beat the odds for your family. I drink bothouse, the green drink that has all the wheatgrass and green things we do not get enough of for our bodies.I also get acupuncture and see a chinese herbalist for ailments because I don't trust the drugs doctors prescribe. There are too many side effects.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@alphagirl...You are so right that everyone's body reacts completely different to medication and there is no real way to predict the response. I'm so sorry about your sister-in-law. Doctors definitely do misdiagnose and we will always be our best advocate in medical situations. There is no way to prepare for a cancer diagnosis and the emotional ramifications can't really be described in words. When I read stories like this my heart breaks in a million pieces. Good to hear that you are so proactive regarding your health. Sometimes I don't have time to make a smoothie so you gave me a great idea to grab one of the premade drinks like green machine.Thanks so much for taking the time to comment and I appreciate your true understanding of this topic.


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 4 years ago from Orlando, FL

A friend told us about raw foods, but not raw fruits and veggies or cheese. Thank you, I will pass this along to my husband. Also we didn't think about germs in doctors offices, actually I did, Dave thinks he's superman and germs bounce off of him. Your information is very important to share and I appreciate you doing so. I'm going to link this hub to my Kick to the Curb hub for others to benefit from. You rock! Be well :)


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Sunshine625...I think it's a guy thing to assume they have superhuman germ propelling powers:) Raw vegetables and fruits without peels and soft cheeses can have bacteria that the body can normally filter out when the immune system is not in a weaker state due to chemo or other cancer treatments. When I was going through chemo I saw so many articles about people that had lost their life to bacterial infections during cancer treatment rather than the cancer itself. I hope this helps others that find themselves going through chemo and makes the road for them a little easier. It is an honor to have a link to one of your hubs. Right back at you with the You rock!! Thanks so much for your support and good wishes Sunshine!!


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 4 years ago from Orlando, FL

I told Dave about the soft cheese, he's bummed. Oh well, it beats the consequences. Thank you again!


Southernmapart 4 years ago

For consideration, I'd like to add: (1) drink plenty of water to quickly wash out the chemo chemicals, (2) take charge of your situation and environment anyway you can, and (3) avoid fish tanks and other water-type effects such as fountains during treatment.

After doctors became aware that water environments stressed chemo patients, many redecorated their offices for "comfort."

There is always hope. I'm a 20-year survivor of chemo, radiation therapy and cancer. Yes, I survived the disease and the treatments.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@Southernmapart...First of all thanks for sharing that you are a 20 year survivor to let people know there is hope! I appreciate you adding to this article additional useful information based upon experience. Drinking plenty of water is really important after chemo to flush everything out. It really did help me to feel in control even in small ways. I chose to fast based upon research and felt like I was taking charge. Also, focusing on my nutrition made me feel more in control. Very true that the body can't filter out certain germs during chemo that can be found in fish tanks and fountains.Thanks so much for taking the time to read this and provide valuable information! Best wishes for a lifetime of continued health!


turnerkristina35 profile image

turnerkristina35 4 years ago from Henderson, nv

Awesome! This is the first hub that I have read from beginning to end! It held my interest because it has a lot of good information; information we will all probably need at some point!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@turnerkristina35...Thank you so much! Your kind comment made my day:) Most of us will probably encounter someone dealing with cancer in our lifetime and I hope this information helps. Thanks so much for the visit!


Pharmd234 4 years ago

Hello! gccefgd interesting gccefgd site! I'm really like it! Very, very gccefgd good!


Deborah Brooks profile image

Deborah Brooks 4 years ago from Brownsville,TX

first I want to ask how are you today? I realized its been 5 months since you wrote this.. bravo to you for writing this to help other people.. and God Bless you. and I pray you a re doing better

Merry Christmas

debbie


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thank you so much for asking how I am Debbie! There is definitely an emotional and physical recovery that takes time after chemotherapy but I am feeling great and so happy to be able to focus on my family and all that life has to offer. I do hope this information helps at least one person going through chemotherapy. Thanks so much for taking the time to read this article and for your good wishes and Merry Christmas to you!


Esther  Strong profile image

Esther Strong 3 years ago from UK

Thank you for taking the time to share your wisdom with others who may be going through the same turmoil. Continue to take good care.

Voted up and more.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@Esther Strong...Thank you so much for your kind words! I hope this information makes the chemotherapy journey a little easier. Thanks so much for taking the time to read this and for the vote!


DDE profile image

DDE 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

Most helpful tips and one should pay careful attention to their lifestyles thanks for this hub


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi DDE! I hope one day people will never have to experience chemotherapy but until then I hope these tips help make the road a little easier. It is important to live a healthy lifestyle to minimize the risk. Thanks so much for stopping by. I appreciate it!


ktrapp profile image

ktrapp 3 years ago from Illinois

Firsthand knowledge makes for the best advice, and the advice and the information you give here for dealing with the effects of chemotherapy are a stellar example of that. I'm sure many people have benefited from your advice and tips. I hope you're doing well.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

You are so right about first hand experience being the best teacher Ktrapp! I wish we lived in a world where cancer din't exist but for those that decide to use chemotherapy I hope these tips really help make it a little easier. I so much appreciate that you took the time to read this and comment! I am doing well and take it all one day at a time.


L.L. Woodard profile image

L.L. Woodard 3 years ago from Oklahoma City

How thoughtful of you to provide this information for others who may be about to undergo chemotherapy.

It's a shame that many of this information you had to learn for yourself; it would seem that as long as chemotherapy has been around, health care professionals would have developed a sort of handbook for chemo patients. I see a great need there that someone such as yourself with both experience and gusto might consider undertaking.

I hope your bionic immune system is helping to keep you healthy, along with your positive attitude.

Great hub; voted up and Shared.


ExpectGreatThings profile image

ExpectGreatThings 3 years ago from Illinois

I am sending hub to a friend right now. I only wish I had discovered you a few months ago :) I think you have a gift for writing and for making the most of every opportunity. And I hope you continue to be healthy!


bridalletter profile image

bridalletter 3 years ago from Blue Springs, Missouri, USA

Good timing for your article, I am sharing it with my brother. It will help us prepare better, 6 weeks from now.


truthfornow profile image

truthfornow 3 years ago from New Orleans, LA

Thanks for sharing with us everything that we really want to know. I have several friends and co-workers going through this right now. I will definitely share with them all your insightful information. Voted up and useful +++.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@truthfornow...Thank you so much for sharing this information with your friends and co-workers. I wrote this based upon experience and from the heart so I hope they find something that will be useful to them. Thanks so much for taking the time to read this and for the vote!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi bridaletter! I hope your brother finds this information helpful. I'm so sorry your brother is going through this but he is lucky to have you on his team. Sending positive energy and strength from Connecticut!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@ExpectGreatThings...Thank you so much for sending this to your friend. It's comments like yours that make me know I did the right thing by writing this to help others. Your kind words brought me to tears despite the fact that I have very few hormones after the surgery:) Thanks so much for the good wishes! I hope to see you again!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi L.L. Woodard! I'm not sure if everyone that goes through cancer is driven to help others but it had that impact. There are so many ways to make chemotherapy easier that require a little knowledge and minimal effort during an overwhelming time. I was surprised that the information I was provided did no more than list the million possible side effects without a way to minimize or completely avoid them. It also did not provide a single tip to get through the emotional aspects. I've learned so much and the bionic immune system is a work in progress and has helped me to feel so much better physically and emotionally. The positive attitude took a little more time. Thanks so much for sharing this to help others and for all that you do:)


KawikaChann profile image

KawikaChann 3 years ago from Northwest, Hawaii, Anykine place

Hi hl2, thanks for the tips - my wife had breast cancer and beat it! She had a brief stint with chemo, but only a few sessions - no side effects, and all went well. This was about 10 years ago, and she always gets the heebee-geebees when she does her annual mammo. We are truly blessed, and I know that it will be well with you as well. Attitude and being your own advocate with a good backup for you is everything! I like your analogy about team, with yourself as the leader calling the shots. Well done, and well written. Be blessed, and in all you do, have peace. Upvoted/awesome/following. Kawi.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi KawikaChann! So happy to hear your wife is doing so well and the cancer experience is now behind her! I'm glad she made it through chemo without any side effects because many have side effects that can be permanent. I guess the stress of follow up tests never completely vanishes. Thank you so much for your kind words and support. It means more than you know!


Deborah Brooks profile image

Deborah Brooks 3 years ago from Brownsville,TX

I remember reading this now.. I am going to link this hub to mine IT'S a SAD SAD DAY. It would help people.

thanks

Debbie


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

You are so kind to link this Debbie. I hope this does help others. Again,so sorry for your loss. When someone is lost to cancer I feel a piece of my heart tearing. There is a lot of exciting research and I hope some of it proves to be successful in preventing or curing cancer.


L.L. Woodard profile image

L.L. Woodard 3 years ago from Oklahoma City

I know it's very easy for me to suggest actions other people can take, but please understand my underlying intentions are good. Patient advocacy is important in all aspects of health care and from what I've read here about the lack of good information for people undergoing chemotherapy, it seems volunteer patient advocates could make quite a difference in people's experiences and emotional/mental coping and attitudes.

Healthylife2, I know in another hub you expressed you are not generally a leader, but I think you are more of one than you give yourself credit for. Might this be an avenue for you to share and help others such as yourself?


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

I can't tell you how much I appreciate your suggestion L.L. Woodard. I have been trying to find a part time job either volunteer or paid. I wanted to do something that would make a difference. This is the first idea that really resonated with me. I feel I have a lot to offer those going through chemotherapy based upon experience and research. My law degree may help also. I am not generally a leader but seem to be able to speak for those in need. Thanks so much for your kind words and for taking your time to help me! You are very perceptive. I got so excited when I saw this comment and have begun researching how to become a patient advocate and the role they play.


L.L. Woodard profile image

L.L. Woodard 3 years ago from Oklahoma City

I'm excited for you and for the people who will benefit from your advocacy. This hub will touch many people, and as a patient advocate you can positively affect many more. Who knows? Maybe it could be the beginning of a wonderful trend! I hope you'll keep me in the loop in your journey -- and I envision future hubs that may inspire others to do the same.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thanks so much L.L. Woodard! It's exciting to finally have a long term goal and I hope I can help others. I absolutely promise to keep you in the loop. and of course if it works out will have to write a hub about it.


Sue Bailey profile image

Sue Bailey 3 years ago from South Yorkshire, UK

This is a marvellous hub LL Woodward. I had cancer a couple of years ago and opted to not have Chemo because I was too scared of the side effects.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

I agree that the side effects are scary Sue. When I received the list of a million possible side effects I was overwhelmed and stressed. It took trial and error and research to find ways to minimize the side effects. Thanks so much for taking your time to read and comment. I hope you are doing well!


KellyG05030 profile image

KellyG05030 3 years ago from New England

I'm so sorry that you had to go through all of this!this article is amazingly written, and it's spot on. We have a friend going through treatments for leukemia for her son, and the boredomduring treatment times and/or hospital stays reallyaffects them. The days seem so long, and the downtime gives them too much time to think. I hope that you are weel and thank you, again, for sharing your excellent tips!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thank you for your kind words KellyG05030! I'm so sorry your friend's son is dealing with treatments. Yes...treatment can be so boring and I wish they would show movies or play the comedy channel or have some type of entertainment to give the mind a break and minimize the monotony. I hope your friend's son brings a lot to keep him distracted because it is healthy to give the mind a break when possible in the midst of a stressful time. Also the caregivers need to bring something to keep them busy because the patient often sleeps during a part of the day from some of the drugs given to prevent a reaction.I am doing well and appreciate that you took the time to read this.I hope these tips help others and I will keep your friend's son in my thoughts!


MissJamieD profile image

MissJamieD 3 years ago from Minnes-O-ta

I'm so sorry you've had to deal with this illness but I'm so very proud of you for being strong and sharing your experiences. The medical field can be a very fickle entity sometimes, never really knowing 100% what will and will not work for patients in any given medical situation. And I agree with you that they should be handing out information on ways to minimize negative side effects on patients in general, especially with treatments such as chemotherapy because many people opt out of the treatments just due to lack of information. Great job on this hub, I have a sister in law that is going through breast cancer surgery just today, I am going to mention these tips I've learned from you and hopefully her healing time is lessened by using these tips as well.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thank you so much for your kind supportive words MissJamieD! You are right that medications work differently for each individual and affect everyone differently. Suggestions that are safe should definitely be offered to minimize side effects because patients really have nothing to lose by trying. Also using techniques to minimize side effects gave me more control over my situation and that was really helpful. Sending positive energy to your sister in law and I hope some of these tips can help her. I will keep her in my thoughts. Thanks so much for your thoughtful comment!


MissJamieD profile image

MissJamieD 3 years ago from Minnes-O-ta

You're so welcome:) And thank you for your thoughts to my sis-in-law. It sounds like they got all the cancer so we're very happy to hear that:)


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

So happy to hear the good news MissJamieD! Thanks for letting me know:)


mariam 3 years ago

excellent info


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thank you so much Mariam!


Rebecca Jimenez 3 years ago

Hi..

I so much enjoyed reading a few of your articles. I had an aunt who had to go chemotherapy. Although she is no longer with my family and I, your article on this subject will certainly help others. Thank you for sharing.

I have elso enjoyed the article you wrote concerning the benefits of water. Thank you again for such wonderful articles! :-)


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Rebecca! So sorry to hear about your aunt. I do hope this article helps others and makes it just a little easier. Thank you so much for your kind words. I hope to see you again!


Amber Vyn profile image

Amber Vyn 3 years ago

I greatly enjoyed this article. Both my mom (lymphoma) and my step-dad (polymyositis) had to go through chemotherapy. I loved the recommendation about the wig.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Amber!

I'm so glad you appreciated this article and took the time to read and comment. I'm sorry your parents had to go through this. I did make some very expensive wig mistakes. I decided not to go through with a custom wig because there was something I didn't trust so I called less than an hour later to ask for a refund. The owner insisted on keeping $1,000 for the consultation that took less than a half hour. I was in the middle of chemo and he was someone that held himself out as compassionate to those going through cancer treatment. I later read some horrible reviews and was glad I got away with only that financial loss. I have other wig stories and may write a hub about the whole wig topic. Thanks so much for stopping by and I hope to see you again.


thitueriusa 3 years ago

It's a shame you don't have a donate button! I'd certainly donate to this brilliant blog! I guess for now i'll settle for bookmarking and adding your RSS feed to my Google account. I look forward to fresh updates and will share this website with my Facebook group. Chat soon! registry cleaner


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thank you so much for your kind words thitueriusa!! I really appreciate you sharing this information. My goal is to help others benefit from my experience.Your comment made my day. I will be updating soon and hope to see you again.


lilacdaffodil 3 years ago

Healthylife2, I pray that God continues to surround you with grace, health, determination, and peace. Kudos to you on a well-written, "caring by reaching out" informative article. Six chemo sessions down and in total remission from diffuse B cell lymphoma, I, too, connected to my inner queen, researched as if working on my doctorate, and sailed through this health journey at the helm, not at the mast. I fervently asked questions and chose complimentary medicine(viscum)mistle therapy - to strengthen my immune system. I found it quite interesting that nutrition was not a topic of interest to my team of doctors. Cranberry and pomegranate juices became staples in my diet. Grapefruit, gogi berries, almond milk, quinoa, sea algae, Agave syrup, and vanilla roibusch tea are now also staples. A hefty dose of the Holy Spirit, study of the Holy Bible, inspirational spiritual tapes, regular visits to my church in Basel, Switzerland and mucho mucho prayer from friends and Family slid me right over the finish line. Six chemo (R-Chop)sessions instead of the eight recommended and a decision to forgo an autologous(my own cells)stem cell transplant has resulted in Total Remission and my ability to reflect on how I got over. I sung Gospel during my outpatient clinic chemo hook-ups. I sung to other patients, nurses, and doctors. God used my voice to speak to others. When I was strong enough, I took African Dance class with my beloved 87 year old dance teacher, Othella Dallas, in Basel. Yep, she is 87! And is AWESOME!! Daily walks with my dog, Sand, (regardless winter) put pep in my step. I purchased two wigs with a medical coupon, but exercised my fabulous collection of hats instead. When a German toddler asked her Father, "'Ist das ein M├Ądchen?'"(Is that a Girl?), I smiled and blew her a kiss. I phoned friends because they were too uncomfortable/afraid to phone me. I sucked on frozen bananas, journalled, watched re-runs of Sanford and Son, applied foundation, lipstick, and sometimes eyeshadow, purchased the most beautiful earrings and painted my nails purple(my fingernails turned blue from chemo). And when I was strong enough, I hit my knees and thanked Jesus for my healing. When I was too weak to kneel, I lay face down on the bed, with my arms outstretched. God always hears, even when we can't make it to our knees. I always claimed a victory! From my heart, I want to thank you healthylife2 for sharing your experience and for inspiring me to pen my journey. Many Blessings to you!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thank you so much for sharing your journey lilacdaffodil! So happy to hear that you are in remission and that you were at the helm throughout your journey.It is shocking that nutrition isn't even addressed when it is vital to rebuild your immune system. Your comment touched my soul and I appreciate that you took your time to add your journey so others can read it when they see this article and they will be inspired.Your beautiful spirit shines through your story.You are in my thoughts for continued good health and never stop nourishing your body and soul.Thanks for your valuable contribution and for making my day:)


creativelycc profile image

creativelycc 3 years ago from Maine

Excellent information, lots of info I know I'll benefit from. Thank you! Having my second chemo treatment in three days. My hair started falling out yesterday-thank God I have a wig - might need to use it tomorrow. I'm going to read about fasting during chemo - never heard that before - sounds very interesting and I plan to build a super immune system too when this is over with.

My daughter wanted me to start drinking Mangosteen juice, but my oncologist told her absolutely not because it might interfere with the affects of chemotherapy .

Happy to learn about biotene since my mouth is starting to feel sore already. I have a sore in the left corner of my mouth which won't go away, hopefully using biotene will help.

How are you feeling now? I hope and pray all is well with you.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Creativelycc! Sometimes when the hair begins falling out it can be a little painful. Shaving helped once it began falling out and I'm glad you have your wig ready for action. My younger son thought it was so cool to watch so I did it with a smile.The fasting is an interesting concept and I avoided future mouth sores. There are forums on fasting during chemo which may be of interest and will help you make an informed decision.. Also, I used biotene at least four times a day and flossed and brushed often. Oncologists rarely support anything a little "fringe" but drink Mangosteen juice when you are done. I'm feeling great although I'm learning the emotional recovery can take a little longer than the physical recovery. Thinking of you during chemo #2 and I hope you will keep me updated.


Maria 3 years ago

I am glad you posted information about the Cold Caps. So many patients don't know anything about them. I successfully used them with chemo and know many other women that had success too.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Maria! I was never informed about them by my doctor and came across them doing my own research. I hope ultimately hospitals have them available and skilled people are there to help patients use the cold caps if they choose to use them. It's so nice to hear that you used them successfully as well as other women. I think eventually the technology will be perfected so they work for everyone. It takes an eternity for the shortest layer of hair to grow back so it would be nice if women could avoid the emotional trauma that can go with hair loss and look in the mirror and fele like themselves. Thanks so much for taking the time to leave a comment.


tv1156 3 years ago

Thank you so much for your amazing insight and information, I'm 43 and just had a dbl mastectomy and my ovaries removed. I stumbled across the cold cap therapy on breastcancer.org and will be meeting with a dr here tomorrow in NYC to learn more about it. I, too wanted to follow the alternative route but have come to the conclusion since the cancer was found in 1 of 27 of my lymph nodes, my best treatment option might be chemo as of right now. I'll be armed with more questions to ask because of your hub. Blessed to have found your page.

Theresa


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healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

You made my day by taking the time to let me know this information was helpful Theresa! Don.t forget you are the team leader and do your own research and ask as many questions as you need. It also helps to bring someone with you to help process the information. Sending you healing energy and keeping you in my thoughts.


chriofvops 3 years ago

I went over this internet site and I think you have a lot of excellent info , saved to my bookmarks (:.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thank you so much chriofvops! I really appreciate your kind words and hope to see you again!


Gabby 3 years ago

Thanks for all the great info. I can now better support my friend who has cancer.


chemonemo 3 years ago

starting chemo in a few days. this def helped me know what to expect. thank you!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi chemonemo!

I was hoping my experience would help others so your comment made my day! Wishing you luck during your journey and feel free to come back any time and ask questions.


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healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

So happy this helped Gabby! You can never have too much support during chemo so I'm sure your friend will appreciate your help.


sprickita profile image

sprickita 3 years ago from Reno

I think the smile on your face was nice and the best medicine. Where thoughts go energy Flows, you are AWESOME thank you 4 sharing.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thanks so much for your kind comment sprickita! It made my whole weekend!! I wanted to help others going through this difficult situation by not only offering helpful information based on personal experience but by putting a positive spin on a very challenging situation.


Jo Ann 3 years ago

Stage 3 breast cancer here. I have been through 14 treatments and have 2 left, then surgery, then radiation, ugh. The neuropathy is so painful in my hands and feet, I can barely get dressed in the morning. I often wish I was never born. I hope this has a happy ending.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Jo Ann! First of all a big congratulations for being in the home stretch with only two treatments left! One step at a time. Sorry about the neuropathy which is a common side effect of many types of chemo. Often it is temporary and completely resolves so I hope that is the case with you. The way you feel is the way you are supposed to feel at this point a a result of steroids and chemo that have a dramatic effect on a person's mental state. It wasn't until I started feeling better than I realized how bad I had been feeling mentally and physically. You are almost done with phase one which is the chemo and an accomplishment but I know the whole thing is miserable. Before you know it you will be on phase 4 and rebuilding your immune system. I will be thinking of you...feel free to e-mail any time.


Frank Thomas 3 years ago

Thanks for this. I've too recently went through 7 rounds of chemo, 6 r-chop and 1-c. So many assumptions are made and we as patients and our loving families have no idea how big the storm is on chemo. Other points I'd like to add, keep yourself hydrated. Very important. Second, you will be so wiped when on chemo work is only optional - if you can. Third, talk with your specialist and tell them your concerns, for things like neuropathy. Mine got so bad that I requested them to reduce the drug that caused it. They were not happy, but they did. Now, about two months after the last treatment, most of it has left. But my fingers have good days and bad. Fourth, FEVER IS BAD!!!! If you start getting a fever, go directly to the hospital. Your body will degrade so fast when on chemo, that waiting hours can mean disaster. And for my fifth, learn about neurophils and what they are. Learn your overall blood chemistry - in other words ask questions whenever they review it. But the neurophils in your blood are basically the front line immune system in your body. In canada, if your counts get below .5, you basically don't have an immune system and your body's own bacteria can kill you! Love to you all and my best wishes are for all of you going or gone through chemo.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Frank!Thank you so much for taking the time to add value to this article.I agree that before beginning chemo it is impossible to know what to expect and the info provided by the doctors isn't sufficient in most cases.I agree that staying hydrated helps a lot. Neuropathy can make it difficult to walk or even button a coat so congrats on taking control and reducing one of the drugs. I was fortunate to avoid it but know so many did not.Being an advocate for yourself is so important. I'm happy to hear it has reduced significantly and you are only two months out. It can take a year or more to feel like yourself again and one day you realize you feel better. I was warned about a fever and took my temperature twice a day and avoided public places when my white blood cell count was low. Congrats on finishing chemo and I'm wishing you good health!!


cuttler profile image

cuttler 3 years ago from HubPages

recently my mom went through chemo and was advised not to eat raw fruits and veges though no explanation was given. I think its important for doctors to fully advice patients on the nitty gritties of chemo to enhance chances of survival. Nice hub. Voted up,


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Cuttler! I'm so sorry your mom is going through chemo and hope she is doing well. The body normally has the ability to filter bacteria that is found on fruits and vegetables but when the while blood cell count decreases that ability is diminished. Cooked veggies are still great and some fruits with a thick peel like a cantaloupe are usually OK. I agree that doctors should provide much more information to help people navigate chemo and prevent dangerous side effects during chemo that can be life threatening. I wrote this to help others so I greatly appreciate that you took the time to to read and comment. I wish your mother the best of luck!!


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 3 years ago from Orlando, FL

Stopping by to say hello and I hope you are doing well :)


DzyMsLizzy profile image

DzyMsLizzy 3 years ago from Oakley, CA

What a well-researched and well-presented Hub! I'm impressed.

I am, however, very sorry you had to go through this at all in order for us to read of these things.

I do believe the reason doctors don't mention nutrition is because they have little if any schooling in the topic. Our system of Western medicine is so totally focused on drugs, drugs, drugs, with Big Pharma bankrolling the process and pushing their drugs instead of healthy eating. It's quite maddening.

Fortunately, neither I nor anyone I know has been through this, but, forewarned is forearmed, as they say. Voted up, useful interesting, shared and Pinned.


izettl profile image

izettl 3 years ago from The Great Northwest

Great hub. I don't have cancer BUT I have an increased awareness now about the shortcomings in the medical field. I have an autoimmune illness, Rheumatoid Arthritis and many of the precautions you need to take are those I must take too, probably all my life. It's been rough getting used to. AND I know exactly what you're talking about. I was shocked when I was diagnosed and doctors want to prescribe toxic medications, some are like cancer drugs and suppress your immune system. Others are steroids and I can relate to the mood swings. I am also shocked at how no doctor has once given me any nutritional advice or recommendations for anything else other than prescriptions. It's a sad reality. So I wanted to thank you for writing this hub and exposing that part of the medical system.


Carola Finch profile image

Carola Finch 3 years ago from Ontario, Canada

I am a cancer survivor who chose to go through chemo. I am all for nutrition and all that, and have exercised vigorously much of my life. A lot of people can make remarks about how bad chemo is, and that it is a big moneymaking plot by pharmaceutical companies. However, if those people are faced with the possibility of dying, I suspect they would go for chemo. I wish people would not judge people's decision to have chemo, or blame them for having it by saying that they got it because they did not eat right.

One thing you did not mention that helped me through my chemo was having a friend sit with me. Chemo is certainly boring.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hey Sunshine! Although I'm dealing a bit with the emotional aftermath that goes with the territory I'm feeling awesome. Thanks for bringing some sunshine on this cold Connecticut day:)


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi DzyMsLizzy! I appreciate your kind words. This came from the heart and first hand experience. It still amazes me that nutrition isn't discussed and that doctors do seem to lack knowledge in this area. I agree that the first think doctors try even for minor health issues are drugs and nutrition rarely enters the picture. I'm glad you have never had to experience this and hope you never do! Unfortunately others have and will experience chemotherapy so I so much appreciate the vote,share,and pin!!


chef-de-jour profile image

chef-de-jour 3 years ago from Wakefield, West Yorkshire,UK

I enjoyed the strength in your writing which will certainly help others. What better use for a hub?

Best wishes.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi izetti! I'm sorry you are dealing with Rheumatoid Arthritis but I'm glad you are being proactive and doing your own research to stay on top of it. Focusing on good nutrition can have a positive impacts on so many diseases and I agree that it's amazing that doctors often neglect to provide this information. Everyone that is diagnosed with a serious illness should leave the office with a bunch of organic kale and a helpful handout on nutrition. Thanks so much for taking the time to read and comment.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Carola! I couldn't agree more that people should never judge others for their choices regarding cancer treatment!! I have heard all the conspiracy statements regarding chemo too but also made my choice. Those same people neglect to state how many lives have been saved with chemo and right now this is one of the best weapons medical science has to offer. There are so many people that owe their lives to chemo. I would like to see statistics on people that chose to use alternative therapy rather than chemo so those that find themselves in the situation can make an informed decision but there aren't any. I also agree that people can never say what they would do if similarly situated unless they actually find themselves faced with the choice. I also exercised a lot before dealing with cancer and at 100 pounds could bench press 120 pounds and beat a guy in a pull up contest. I mentioned on one of the side notes under what to bring to chemo that cancer gets boring but did not mention to bring a friend. I will add that advice. Thank you so much for taking the time to comment and for showing your true understanding of this article.Wishing you good health!!


tirelesstraveler profile image

tirelesstraveler 3 years ago from California

Presented the fasting idea to my oncologist yesterday. He was quit interested.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thank you so much for your kind words chef-de-jour! I appreciate that you used the word strength although I wasn't always strong during the process but I put every ounce of strength I had into it. I hope this article gives others strength.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi tirelesstraveler! I hope fasting helps you and many others in the future. Thanks for letting me know that my article added value in some way. Please keep me updated if time and energy allows. I like to know if this concept has helped others. Thank you for taking your time to comment.


Chris bergstrom 2 years ago

I faster as well for 24 hrs before I got chemo and around 36 hrs after. I had ALL lukemia, so I had 9 months of intense chemo. I started fasting mid way through the 7th month of chemo, and I was never able to do a complete fast. But, it really worked for me. I don't think I would have been able to do the last 2 rounds if I hadn't fasted. So, if you are going through chemo, I strongly suggest you try fasting.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Chris! Thanks for taking the time to let me know that fasting was a success for you. It takes so long for the formal studies to be completed so it is nice to hear from individuals and I have only heard of it being beneficial. I hope doctors eventually recommend this as an option. Congratulations on completing such a challenging course of chemo and I wish you the best!!


tirelesstraveler profile image

tirelesstraveler 2 years ago from California

How long do you fast? Started new chemo Thursday. Fasted about18 hours. No side effects , but had to start juice during


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi tirelesstraveler! I fasted 2-3 days before chemo and about 24 hours after but did drink water. The results of the studies still haven't been released but there are several people fasting during chemo that are discussing their individual results in forums. Happy to hear that you did not experience side effects so far! If you have time and energy please keep me updated.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

@Tirelesstraveler...I added a more detailed explanation to my hub on fasting during chemotherapy in the side capsule. I am thinking of you and I hope it helps.


WriterJanis profile image

WriterJanis 2 years ago from California

This will be so helpful to so many people. My aunt went through this years ago, but didn't have this kind of information to help her.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi WriterJanis! I hope this does help people by making a situation that is physically and emotionally challenging a little easier. So many of us know someone that has or will go through chemotherapy. I hope your aunt is doing well! Thanks so much for taking the time to read and comment. It is appreciated and I hope you visit again!


torrilynn profile image

torrilynn 2 years ago

Thanks for this hub. It was informative and straight to the point. Im sure these tips will help my nephew who has leukemia. Up and useful.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi torrilynn! I sincerely hope these tips help your nephew. Sending good thought his way:) Thanks so much for the vote.


LindaInSt.Louis 2 years ago

Dear HealthyLife2, I am so very grateful for all of this valuable information! You have surely helped many of those who are going through what you did. I am so happy to hear that you are in remission!! Praise God! My dear mother (83 yrs.of age) is going through her second series of chemo for pancreatic cancer, after being in remission for 2 years! God bless her! She is diabetic, which complicates her health. Her mother, my sweet grandmother who was like a mother to me, had suffered from cervical cancer back in the 1960s. She went through chemo and radiation treatments....Thank the Lord, we were blessed to have her with us, to love, until she was 95! My father passed from a heart attack at age 66, Im very sad to say....so, now that I'll be 63 in March, Im very concious of taking care of my health, more so than ever! All of your excellent advice is great for all of us...some Ive already implemented due to Dr. Oz's good advice. Thank you again, for sharing such wonderful information! I pray it will help my mother to attain remission again! God bless you and your family! In Christ's love, Linda


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Linda! Thank you so much for taking the time to give me feedback. I wrote this to help others so feedback means so much to me. Thank you for sharing your story about your family. I'm so happy to hear that you are taking control of your own health because that makes such a difference and you can't rely on others to do it. I think Dr. Oz has great advice to and watch his show also. I'm sending healing energy to your mother and so much appreciate your supportive comment!!


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 2 years ago from Ontario, Canada

I'm back for a second visit. I was diagnosed with stage IV non small cell lung cancer back in September so I'm going through chemo again. Actually I just finished my 4th round and depending on what my CAT scan says this Friday will determine what type of chemo I get to have next. I'm amazed that I've not lost my hair, have not tossed my cookies once, and generally feel not too bad considering. I had to go to this chemo class before starting chemo and they told me a few things that they never did 23 years ago. We were told to make sure that for a week after having chemo administered to be sure and flush the toilet twice. This is so that anyone going to the washroom after you does not come in contact with the chemo. They also told us to make sure that we had protected sex. Not that many people actually want to have sex while going through chemo ... but.... Your point on fasting I find interesting as my oncology nurse instructed me to make sure to eat every couple of hours, small meals, to avoid nausea. I've found that if I don't eat I do feel a tad sick.


fpherj48 profile image

fpherj48 2 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

This is a most valuable and helpful hub! I'm a firm believer in "Forewarned is forearmed," and in keeping one's mind (and options) open at all times. Health and Wellness are NO small matters.

You have done a marvelous service to so many by presenting this important information. I listen well to the Voice of experience. When one has "been there," it only makes good common sense to take their advice into full consideration.

I wish the very best and send you Sunshine & smiles.....Peace, Paula

UP +++


Levertis Steele profile image

Levertis Steele 2 years ago from Southern Clime

What a useful hub! I pray that many people who need a lifeline to help them through chemo find this information helpful. This is a valuable community service. I must add that the spinich looks delicious, and I am thinking about having some for lunch.

Thanks for sharing.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Susan, First I am sorry that you are embarking on the cancer journey once again but happy that you are tolerating the chemo well. How nice that you didn't lose your hair! Thanks for adding the two additional helpful tips. I have heard that depending on the chemo it is necessary to flush the toilet twice but I did it to be safe since I have children and a husband in the house.I'm also glad you added the importance of protected sex because although it wasn't at the top of my list it is good to know and something that was not mentioned to me. I was given two different drugs for nausea and only needed one. A friend that went through it more than ten years ago was so surprised that people rarely get sick from chemo anymore. I fasted because I was terrified of neuropathy which seemed to happen to the majority that had the chemo I did and fasting is one way to protect the healthy cells so it was a benefit for me. It might be worth getting the medical studies on fasting during chemo on PubMed and checking out the forums where people are actually fasting during chemo and discussing their results. Of course talk to your doctor as well and do your own research so you can make an informed decision.I found your blog so will be following your progress and hope you keep me updated. Sending much strength and healing energy your way!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi fpherj48,

Thank you so much for your kind words! Although this was a difficult experience both physically and emotionally I hope others can benefit from it and have an easier time. Experience is absolutely the best teacher.Thanks so much for bringing some sunshine to me on this cold Winter day in Connecticut:)


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Levertis Steele,

Thank you so much for your thoughtful words. I wrote this with the hope that it will help others and make the journey a little less challenging physically and emotionally. Spinach is packed with nutrients and I hope you have some:) Thanks so much for taking the time to read and comment.


RunningDeer profile image

RunningDeer 2 years ago from Iowa

What a beautiful hub. Thank you for sharing your experience and tips. I hope your health is well and doing better.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thank you so much for your support RunningDeer! I am doing well and now have enough hair to get haircuts again and really appreciate them and enough energy to go to the gym.Thanks so much for reading.


Janey Hood profile image

Janey Hood 2 years ago from UK

Thank you for this article, I hope anyone considering going through chemotherapy finds it. I wished it had been around when I did!

I hope you are keeping well.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

I had to learn a lot through research and trial and error so I hope others can benefit from my experience.I am doing well and hope you are too:)


b10hove 2 years ago

Thank you so much for the information. I start chemotherapy tomorrow for Waldenstrom syndrome. I will be getting 6 rounds of Cytoxin, Rituxin, and Depomedrol. The fear of the unknown is my biggest obstacle. I already have peripheral neuropathy where it is difficult to walk so I am hopeful that reducing the IGM level will also reduce the attack on my nervous system. With Waldenstrom syndrome being as rare as it is there is little information out there to help. Your information is well received. Being a health care provider as a Physician Assistant in the emergency room setting for over 15 years I have had the opportunity to see first hand the results of patients waiting to long to go to the ER when a febrile episode occurs. I am not looking forward to this journey as my life and career will be put on hold as the risk for infection during this treatment will be intensified. It is wonderful to get information from a survivor and not from a textbook. Your insights are well received and will help me through this new chapter in my life. I will keep you posted as this journey commences. Sometimes too much information from your education does more harm than good. Your information relieves that stress. Thanks for being there.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi b10hove, I'm so happy these tips based on first hand experience are helpful to you and it means a lot to me that you took the time to let me know. I was terrified before my first chemo so am hoping this helps reduce the fear for others. I found out it was very possible to make it through even if challenging at times. Mt life was put on hold as well but looking back I'm glad I made the effort to avoid germs as much as possible. I found it is possible to take a break from your life. During chemo you have to make yourself important which isn't a bad skill to learn and absolutely accept help if it will benefit you. I would appreciate it if you have time to keep me updated on your journey. I will be thinking of you tomorrow as you begin this challenge. Sending you much strength!


b10hove 2 years ago

First dose was rough. Cytoxin went in without a hitch but rituxin was a rough one. Had to stop several times do to severe back pain, crushing feeling in my chest, extreme shortness of breath, and the infamous rituxin rigors. Got through it all albeit 8 hours long. I guess having the knowledge of what expect kept the stress at a minimum. I know this is all for the good so I am fighting on. Today just some general malaise with a little muscle weakness. I'm keeping on the zofran to keep the nausea at bay so far no problems there. Tomorrow seems to be the big day for problems so I'm getting myself ready for that emotionally. Good support here from family. Thanks again for having this sight available to vent. I will keep you informed as I go. Thanks again to everyone for their information from actual experience and not textbooks.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

I'm so happy you returned for an update b10hove! I check this site daily. The first dose was the hardest for me too. The rituxin sounds brutal and I hope the next rounds go easier. Drink a lot of water when you get home to flush everything out. Did you also get Emend for nausea? Zofran was my backup and works also but Emend is amazing. It's good to be proactive with the nausea because you don't need that additional challenge. I also brushed and flossed several times a day and used biotene mouthwash to minimize mouth sores. Please keep me updated and focus on doing whatever you have to to take care of yourself during this time. Happy to hear you have awesome support.


Writer Fox profile image

Writer Fox 2 years ago from the wadi near the little river

I think it is very generous of you to share your personal experiences with chemotherapy here. Your positive attitude will benefit many people. Enjoyed and voted up!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thank you for that kind comment Writer Fox!! I never even thought of it as generous but I do hope to make the physical and emotional aspects a little less challenging for those that find themselves going through chemotherapy.It was a difficult time but I hope writing about my experience helps others.Thanks so much for taking the time to comment and for the vote.


suzandmichelle 2 years ago

Thank you sooo much! I just passed this info on to a newly diagnosed dear cousin in Ocala, FL. I have sat with many chemo patients and you are right on - esp. when dealing with doctors and nutrition and anything new. How are you doing? I saw that your focus is on building up your immune system. I'd love to send you some milk Kefir grains, if that interests you? Read up on it and just say the word if you'd like to make it at home, so that you can avoid all the sugar and questionable dairy in the supermarket stuff. Again, many thanks for taking the time to help others who have no experience navigating all this scary stuff. All the Very Best! SuzD


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi SuzD,

Thanks so much for leaving your nice comment. I hope this info helps your cousin. Nutrition can make such a difference during and after chemo and I hope one day doctors give this info to patients to help them recover and transition to a healthier lifestyle. I am feeling good and trying to make that choice every day to take care of myself and focus on my nutrition. Sometimes I have to get back on track but the goal is always there. Thanks again for your kind comment!!


GClark profile image

GClark 2 years ago from United States

I just completed my 11th session of Chemo Therapy. A 5 hour session. Most have been anywhere from 5 to 3 hours. At this point can say I feel very lucky as have had no bad side effects. Believe that the doctor one has makes all the difference because he is the one to choose the drugs and dosage and how often it is given plus closely monitors your blood work. There are so many variables to choose from and you do not want a doctor who goes by the one size fits all forumla as so many do. That is why it is so important that you select the besst doctor to begin with!!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi GClark,

Sorry you are going through chemo but so happy to hear that you don't have any side effects after 11 sessions. Mine usually lasted around 5 hours too. It important to have someone or something there for a distraction. I completely agree that the doctor you choose for your team is key. I didn't really connect with mine but did trust her medically and the place I went which is most important. I think getting more than one opinion for something so serious can help the decision making process to find the right doctor. Thanks for commenting and I will be thinking of you!


Tolovaj profile image

Tolovaj 2 years ago

It's great to see chemo worked well and I am happy I learned few new things about side effects which can be in some cases even worse than the illness. Trick with fasting is new to me. I suppose everything what slows the metabolism could work in patient's favor. Thanks for all the useful info, I'll try to pass it around!


SuzD 2 years ago

You can get info about fasting at the Mayo site. They have been successful with their fasting trials. Dr. That was running the trial actually had to test his own theory after cancer diagnosis. It was successful !


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Tolovaj,

There can be some horrible side effects with chemo but taking control and reducing them as much as possible is so worth it. The fasting is a new concept but gradually more information is emerging. Thanks so much for taking the time to read and comment and for sharing the information. Welcome to HubPages!!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi SuzD,

Thanks so much for updating me on the short term fasting concept. I found it fascinating when I first discovered it and implemented it. I had no idea that the doctor conducting the trial ended up testing the theory and I'm so happy to know it was successful. I will check out the Mayo clinic site and update my fasting article. This is exciting new information. Thanks for taking the time to comment and nice to see you again!


SecondCharm 2 years ago

I had the same experience with my doctors during my chemo in 2010. They knew next to nothing about supportive care to ease the chemo, methods to prevent complications, or suggestions to regain my health after chemo. Thankfully doctors have learned a lot about curing cancer, but it is up to patients to figure out how to get healthy again. It can be done if you make the commitment to your health.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi SecondCharm,

This seems to be a common experience. I hope in the future doctors take a more active role in helping patients minimize side effects and rebuild their immune systems after chemo even if they provide written material. You are right that it is completely up to the patient to be proactive. Welcome to HubPages and I hope you are doing well!!


SuzD 2 years ago

I had the opportunity to discuss fasting with the director af the Mayo Clinic Cancer Centers. He was the one who told me about the fasting clinical trials doctor.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

So interesting that you had the opportunity to speak to the director SuzD. I hope the fasting concept helps many.


Tracy Bigby 2 years ago

God Bless you...and I pray that you are doing well. I've lost a few too cancer and I know they didn't lose the battle ..they just went to heaven to watch over us all. Xxoo


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Tracy, Thank you for checking this article out. I am doing well. I take it all one day at a time.Thank you for asking. There are many new advances in cancer research but still too many lost.


suzD 2 years ago

Not hard for me to use him as a great resource... He's my daughter's father-in-law and a longtime family friend:)


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Good to have a reliable resource suzD!


June Scarantino 2 years ago

Bless you! My daughter is 25 and was diagnosed with breast cancer 4 months ago. We were devastated but she is so strong and positive. She is trying network with young cancer patients in their 20's. She wants to get the word out there so women 30 and below check themselves. Women in their 20's don't think this can happen to them. IMAP proud of her. So keep fighting and I'm behind you for helping other cancer patients.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi June,

I'm so sorry that your daughter has breast cancer but happy to hear she has a positive attitude because that will help so much. How kind of her to think of others in her age group and to be willing to help. You should be proud of her and she is lucky to have you on her team!! Thank you so much for your kind words and support. They made my day.


Mar1968 2 years ago

Ice bath the fingers. I didn't lose any fingernails and I ice bathed every treatment.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thank you for adding that information Mar1968. Ice is also he concept behind cold caps to prevent hair loss. Ice can also be used with doxil to prevent hand foot syndrome.


Kim 2 years ago

very good advice I agree 100%


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 years ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thank you for reading and for your comment Kim!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 22 months ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Sheila, It makes me so happy to know this was helpful to you! It is so beneficial when the oncologist is on board with nutritional benefits that make the road a little bit easier. Nutrition can be really helpful in preventing or minimizing side effects. Wishing you the best and feel free to return with updates.


zelda 18 months ago

Little to late for me, but now I have to build up my body. I often wished that they would at least let you know what could happen to your body. Four months down the line I am still finding out things that can go wrong. Your write is very helpful and like I say wish I had it when I started.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 18 months ago from Connecticut, USA Author

I'm glad this information was helpful Zelda and I hope you are doing well. Building up your body after chemotherapy is as important as going through it. It takes a good diet and exercise when you are able. It takes hard work but be patient with yourself because recovery doesn't happen in a straight line and it may take longer than doctors claim. I wish you the best of luck!


SusanDeppner profile image

SusanDeppner 18 months ago from Arkansas USA

Interesting about the fasting and the cold cap. I don't think I had read those tips before, and I know I'd never heard of the cold cap. I was fortunate, only needing two chemo treatments for my rare type of cancer. I would have liked to know more about the "chemo fog," which my oncologist assured me was not a figment of my imagination and still persists, in various ways, to this day (5 1/2 years later). Thanks for this very helpful information. I pray that you are well!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 18 months ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Nice to see you again Susan! I found the fasting interesting also and implemented it. I'm surprised that many people are still not informed about the cold caps. Losing my hair was traumatic for me and for others. It would be nice to make the road a little easier for those that go through chemotherapy. There was a recent article in the New York Times about cold caps. I hope that will make many more people aware of them. I had chemo brain as well but it eventually went away. However, any of the side effects can last longer than doctors claim or be permanent to some extent. I'm glad you are doing well and only needed two treatments. Thank you for your good wishes and I am doing well. I will be by soon to check out your hubs.


mary615 profile image

mary615 17 months ago from Florida

I do hope you are now doing well. I've never had to take chemo, but I've sure seen some good friends and relatives go through treatments.

I keep hoping a cure for cancer will be found one day soon.

My best to you.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 17 months ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi mary615,

Thank you for the kind words. I am doing well and need to get back on track with my diet. I'm glad you haven't had to go through chemo but I'm sorry you have had to watch some close friends and family members go through it. Every day I hope for a cure! Thank you so much for taking the time to comment and I hope you are enjoying the Summer.


mujercampesina 15 months ago

I loved this.... I just finished Day #1 of my 2nd cycle of treatment for Stage 3 ovarian cancer and I found this very helpful. I am in Canada, and my oncology team actually covered several of these suggestions. I have only gone for 4 treatments but I always bring a friend. I don't know how I would survive the fear and stress of this without my friends. I am glad to hear you are doing well, and thank you for all your sharing on this site


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 15 months ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi mujercampesina,

It's great that your oncology team is taking the time to help you through the process. Bringing a friend is very important. This is at least a two person job. I always brought my husband with me. I hope you are getting through it with minimal side effects but the important things is that you are getting through it! I will be thinking of you in Canada and am sending healing energy from Connecticut. Please keep me updated on your progress.


Pat A. 11 months ago

Thank for your post. I am going through chemo currently at the end of the 3rd cycle. Your tips a brilliant. When I began chemo, I had no idea what to expect. Everyone seemed to think that providing me with pamphlets was the best way to inform the patient. No mention of fasting, the tip about keeping the mouth clean is timely for me. Once again thank you.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 11 months ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Pat,

I'm so happy these tips were helpful to you. I think sometimes the most useful information comes from those that have gone through the same experience rather than pamphlets written by people that have never been there. Congratulations on making it through number 3! Thank you for taking the time to comment and I'm sending you healing energy and best wishes from Connecticut.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 11 months ago from America

Your information is very important to anyone going through chemo. I wish we had known all of this when my husband was going through it. We were given no information and when we ask the doctor a question he seemed to get irritated with us.

We had so many people who had never had cancer insist that my husband needed to eat lots of vegetables and fruit. I didn't bother to explain he wasn't going to be doing that. He ended up unable to eat much of anything, no matter what I made him he could only get a few bites down.

Eventually, he couldn't walk they blamed it on the steroids.


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 11 months ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Moonlake,

Someone should provide information to all patients going through chemo that is useful on a practical day to day level. I'm so sorry your husband went through chemo and I wish someone had been more helpful. Some of the doctors are absolutely horrible and when people are going through chemo they need all the support they can get. Sometimes blended food is a little easier such as smoothies. I took much less than the recommended steroids because they can have some horrible side effects. They were given for nausea but other things helped more including the fasting. Thank you so much for your comment!


Sue 4 months ago

I hope this finds you well. Where I went for met cancer treatment, they are so very helpful and considerate of the patients and the caregivers. All of the information you wanted, plus a lot more was provided before we were in the strenuous part of chemo. They even scheduled a "class" where I could bring caregivers, family, friends, whomever I wished, and the answered any and all questions plus gave printed information. This was my class. Each cancer patient has one. I decided from the first day I would ask for any and all information......and if they didn't provide it, I would go elsewhere. My oncologist gave us his card.....with all of his contact numbers and instructions to call anytime day or night if I needed him.


Margie Lynn profile image

Margie Lynn 3 months ago from Beautiful Texas Hill Country

Thanks so much for this informative hub, I have a friend have a port but in as I am writing this! I am going to share this with her! This is her second time with cancer, she had a breast removed. She only did radiation. She really did not want to do chemo. This time it is in her colon and lump nodes. I pray she does not get so sick! Thanks for sharing!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 months ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Sue,

It sounds like you found an amazing place to receive treatment. Every place should be that helpful and supportive. I believe it makes a big difference. Thank you for stopping by and I hope you are doing well!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 months ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Margie,

I hope this article helps your friend. They now have medication to prevent nausea which works for the majority. Chemo can be challenging but there are many ways to combat the side effects. Every time my words help someone else it makes my day! I will be thinking of your friend.


Margie Lynn profile image

Margie Lynn 3 months ago from Beautiful Texas Hill Country

Thanks so much! Keep up the great hubs!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 months ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Thank you for your support and kindness Margie! I am eager to stop by and check out your hub!


Michelle 3 months ago

Hi this has been the best article I've read so far... I've been recently diagnosed breast cancer and also noticed none of my "team" has discussed nutrition and what to expect realistically.... Thank you!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 3 months ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Michelle,

I'm so glad you found this articles helpful. Your comment made my day! Nutrition is so helpful and can help with some of the side effects and overall health.It's crazy that it's neglected by the people that are there to help. I am sending healing energy your way!


Momo 3 months ago

My oncologist nixed number nine because if there's any chance that your cancer has spun off a few cells to your brain, they would survive the chemo if your head is kept cold enough that the chemo drugs can't get through to them. The American Cancer Society has tons of nutrition and other information that's free for the asking. Please go to breastcancer.org if you have breast cancer, and join conversations of interest. Do LOTS of research at reputable sites only, and you will formulate your own questions!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 months ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Momo,

Always check with your doctor so you can make an informed decision. Thank you for the additional resource and for taking the time to comment.


Ellie 2 months ago

Thankful that I found your page. My mom starts chemo on Wednesday. She was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer in June. Tumor removed and double mastectomy. Her oncologist recommended 6 rounds of chemo. They really didnt give us any info and felt so scared and confused. I found your page and it has helped me alot since I will be caring for my mom. Thank you and God bless for sharing your experience with us all :)


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 2 months ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Ellie,

Thank you so much for your kind comment. It made my day because I wrote this to help others! I will be thinking of your Mom tomorrow. Please keep me updated! She is lucky to have you to care for her because that makes a big difference:)


Ellie 7 weeks ago

Your comment brought me to tears. It is nice to know that you're not alone and there are people who care and have been through this journey. My mom is doing well. She did really good during her first round. Wednesday will be her second. She just started losing hair and it was a little hard for her and I have to admit for myself too. I remembered your site and came back for some encouragement tonight. Your story helps me to keep strong for my mom. Many thanks!


healthylife2 profile image

healthylife2 6 weeks ago from Connecticut, USA Author

Hi Elle,

Now it's my turn for tears. I'm so happy to hear that your Mom is doing well. I will be thinking of her on Wednesday and at that point she will be a third of the way done with chemo..real progress. Losing my hair was extremely difficult and I tried to wear my wig around my children so we could give our minds breaks. It does grow back but looking different is a reminder of the journey. Good luck on Wednesday and I am sending much healing energy your way! Please keep me updated!

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