Help for Cracked, Bleeding Heels

The At-Home Remedy

Cracked, calloused feet can bleed and cause excruciating pain. When heels, feet, and toes become dry and hardened, no amount of lotion, cream, or soaking can help. After years of suffering, I followed my doctor's advice and have found the cure for this condition.

Causes of Dry, Cracked Heels

Your feet are the workhorses of your body. They bear your full weight on just a few square inches. That's why the skin on your feet is thicker than skin elsewhere on your body. Your feet are meant to be pliable in order to accommodate the variation in weight from resting your feet lightly on the ground, or pounding the pavement during an intense run. Skin requires moisture in the form of oil in order to stay pliable. When your feet become dry, callouses—dry, thickened skin cells—build up. Because callouses are made up of layers of dry, non-living skin, they are prone to cracking and splitting. Once a crack starts, it can continue until it rips into living skin.

Some people have naturally smooth, soft feet while others are cursed with dry, callous-prone skin. Although tough, dry feet often run in families, age, personal care, and environmental factors can increase the likelihood of developing unsightly, painful heels, foot pads, and toes. Because skin loses its elasticity with age, older people may experience more cracking. Even young people can develop cracked, dry feet from going barefoot or wearing open-heel shoes or sandals. Some medical conditions, such as psoriasis or other skin-related conditions, diabetes, kidney and thyroid disease can cause a loss of moisture in the feet. Excess weight places additional pressure on foot pads and can increase the chances that callouses will crack and become fissures. Fissures are deep cracks that go all the way to the blood supply under the callous. Fissures often bleed and may become infected.


Callouses don't respond to moisturizer; they are nothing more than dead skin and can't absorb moisture into the cell. To moisturize feet, you need to get down to living skin.


Forget the high-priced heel creams. While feet need moisture to heal and prevent further damage, most drugstore emollients will do. The trick is to remove the offending callouses so the moisture can reach the live skin underneath then keep the callouses at bay. A three-prong approach that includes soaking, filing and moisturizing can help you get the relief you need.

  1. Start by soaking feet in a warm salt water bath. Sea salt or Epsom salts is best due to their nourishing mineral. Add a few drops of essential oils, such as tea tree, peppermint or lavender, to help clean and disinfect deep into the cracks. Peppermint oil helps cool hot, tired feet while lavender works to heal skin irritations. Tea tree is a great antibacterial and anti-fungal agent.
  2. Dry feet and file with a small to medium size foot file. The best ones look a bit like a cheese grater. These files catch the dead skin inside rather than allowing the debris to fly around the room or mound up on the floor. File off as much callous as you can but stop before you get to the pink skin. Warning: This may be extremely painful if your feet are cracked and bleeding. You may need to attempt this over several days or get someone to help you.
  3. After you've filed as much callous as you can, hydrate with a rich emollient moisturizer—but only if you do not have existing cracks. If you have bleeding cracks, do not apply a moisturizer at this point as it will sting and burn like crazy. Skip to the next step. If you are in maintenance mode and do not have open cracks, use a moisturizing sealant product with urea, an ingredient that traps moisture and softens skin. Several foot creams and balms, such as Flexitol Heel Balm or the prescription Aluvea, contain urea. Swaddle feet in thick socks or wrap with plastic wrap to allow maximum penetration for at least 4 hours, preferably overnight. Warning: You may experience new or more painful cracks at this point as the callous that protected the crack has been removed.
  4. If cracks are deep and painful or you experience new cracks after filing, apply a dab of antibiotic ointment then wrap with an ace bandage until the broken skin underneath the callous begins to heal. You may need to wear the bandage for a day or more and especially overnight. During the day, wrap the heel and cover with a sock and a tight-fitting shoe. At night, re-apply ointment and wear the bandage overnight. See your doctor if your pain does not go away, increases, or if redness or swelling occurs. If you are a diabetic or have poor circulation to your lower extremities, see your doctor before wrapping with bandages.
  5. Soak and file feet once a week, moisturizing at least once a day. You should begin to see softer, smoother heels and feet in just a few days.
  6. See your doctor if you experience fever, swelling or red streaks up your foot or leg. These symptoms could signal a serious infection.

The Best Offense

Moisturize your feet daily to prevent deep cracks and bleeding. Apply moisturizer—even just a dab of plain old Vaseline or some olive oil scented with pure lavender oil—under your socks each day to help keep feet softer and smoother.

One Exceptional Cream

While most creams won't moisturize dead, calloused skin, Aluvea can help slough off dead cells, but it is a prescription. Ask your dermatologist for it. It's wonderful!

Conair Foot Spa with Bubbles & Heat
Conair Foot Spa with Bubbles & Heat

Start your treatment by soaking feet in a warm bath with sea salt and essential oils. These Foot Spas can be purchased online or in stores. They are easy to use but be sure to clean thoroughly after each use as dead skin can collect in the tiny air holes.

Microplane Foot File XL-Pro Dual Cartridge Teal
Microplane Foot File XL-Pro Dual Cartridge Teal

Follow your foot soak with a good filing with a high quality file like this one from Microplane with two sizes of file heads and an extra long handle for easier reach. Don't file feet when dry, only after they have soaked to loosen callouses. Soak the head in rubbing alcohol to keep it clean.


© 2015 Viola Horne

New Guestbook Comments 3 comments

oiloflife 3 years ago

Try olive oil based soaps!!!

delia-delia profile image

delia-delia 3 years ago

Great information...I have dry skin because of my thyroid condition, rather the lack of a thyroid. I can't hydrate my skin no matter what I have used, humid weather seems to be the only with winter and snow coming up, I dread my fingers cracking, it's painful.

Viola Horne profile image

Viola Horne 3 years ago Author

@delia-delia: I know how you feel! Colorado is extremely bad. I have to run humidifiers in several rooms to keep the cracking at bay. Thanks for the comment!

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