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What to Expect After Cataract Surgery

Updated on January 07, 2017
Marisa Wright profile image

Marisa Wright writes about mental and physical wellbeing based on her personal experiences, as well as those of her family.

If you've just had cataract surgery, you may be feeling a little confused. These days it's a walk-in, walk-out procedure, and you may go straight back to work next day. On the other hand, you've probably been given a leaflet telling you to take a whole range of precautions for the next several days, weeks or even months.

So, should you treat yourself with kid gloves or not?

It's understandable doctors want to downplay the risks of cataract surgery. Why make patients needlessly anxious, when most people sail through with no complications? However, you only have one set of eyes, so it's important to know what you can and can't do, and what's worth worrying about.

Take It Easy!

After cataract surgery, your eye may feel gritty or sore, but otherwise you'll be back to your normal self - with the bonus that the world suddenly looks bright and sparkling! - so it's tempting to think you can plunge straight back into normal life.

Don't! You've just undergone incredibly delicate eye surgery. Even though you can't see it, and may not be able to feel it, you now have a wound in your eye that needs to heal. You may have tiny stitches - you don't want them to burst! The new lens isn't securely embedded in place yet, and you don't want it to be jolted out of position (because that will leave you with blurry vision forever), and you don't want to do anything that might cause swelling or bleeding behind the eye.

Although it takes a couple of months for your eye to fully heal, it's in the first week or two that you have to be most careful.

Special Precautions for Showering and Bathing

Don't get your head wet

Be careful showering after cataract surgery
Be careful showering after cataract surgery

Ordinary water from the tap can harbour bacteria - or it can wash bacteria from your skin into your eye. Keep your face out of the shower for the first week - not just to avoid getting water in your eyes, but also to avoid any need to rub or press on them (think about it - what's the first thing you do after you've dunked your face under water?).

You can use baby wipes or make-up wipes to clean your face until you're allowed to put your head under the shower.

Of course, that means you also can't wash your hair. Most surgeons recommend you don't wash your hair at all for the first two or three days, and after that they'll only allow you to wash it with your head tilted backwards, so the water runs away from your face. If that's a problem at home, you may need to go to a hairdresser's.

It also means absolutely no swimming and especially no hot tubs for the first two weeks. Swimming pools and spas are loaded with bacteria - that's why they have to be constantly dosed with chlorine and other chemicals. The hotter the water, the more likely there are bacteria in the water and you cannot afford to get them anywhere near your eye! Contamination in seawater is also commonplace, so sea bathing is out of the question too.

When Can I Go Back to the Gym?

Don't do physical exercise or weights straight after cataract surgery

Although a few doctors say you can go straight back to normal after surgery, most surgeons recommend NO exertion for the first week. That includes any kind of exercise, including all sports, no matter how gentle.

After a week, you can start gentle activity such as walking or lawn bowls.

You must wait at least two weeks before restarting any vigorous exercise such as aerobics, contact sports or weight training.

If you're an exercise nut or a keen sportsman, you may be tempted to ignore these restrictions - however, isn't it better to miss out on a couple of weeks' exercise than risk your sight? Think about the impact of your foot on the pavement when you run, and how that jarring transmits through your body to your eye. Imagine the feeling of pressure in your body when you lift a heavy weight - that transmits to your eye, too.

More importantly, if you work in a job that involves physical exertion - even if it's baby-sitting the grandkids - let your surgeon know. Because most cataract patients are retired, doctors often forget to ask what you do for a living. Even if they know you're working, they may assume an older person isn't doing a physically demanding job. That's why one grandma didn't know that picking up her hefty young grandson would tear her stitches and require another operation!

If your work involves lifting heavy objects, digging, or any other physical activity, you may have to take one or two weeks' sick leave, or request light duties, for the two weeks after your op.

When Can I Have Sex After Cataract Surgery?

Many people are too shy to ask their surgeon about when they can resume sex after cataract surgery. And if you're in an older age bracket, the doctor may (wrongly) assume it doesn't apply!

The most common advice is that you can resume "gentle" sexual relations one week after surgery. Unfortunately,there's no explanation of what that means!

Remember that for the first two weeks, you're only allowed to go walking or bowling. Are you more vigorous in the sack than that? Be honest, now! For the average active male, a two week wait would be more realistic and much safer. However, the best solution is to pluck up the nerve to ask your own surgeon!

Housework and Gardening

Protect Your Eye

With your newly acquired eyesight, you're probably horrified at the dust and debris you couldn't see before - but hold your horses!

  • Bending over at the waist (weeding, scrubbing floors) puts too much pressure on the eye, so you need to be patient and put up with it for a couple more weeks.
  • Garden soil is absolutely chockful of bacteria, so you need to stay well away from it.
  • You mustn't lift anything over 15 lbs for the first few weeks - so someone else may have to take out the trash.

It's not a good idea to mow the lawn after cataract surgery, because mowing sends so much dust into the air - but if you must, wear wraparound sunglasses to avoid any risk of grass blades or soil blowing into your eye.

In fact, it's a good idea to wear sunglasses whenever you go outside. If you wore glasses before the op, you've probably forgotten how easy it is to get something in your eye on a windy day! Even a tiny speck of dirt or dust can be contaminated, so don't take chances.

Gritty or Dry Eyes After Cataract Surgery

It's normal for your eyes to feel scratchy or a little tender after surgery. You may feel as though you have debris or grit in your eye. You should only worry if your pain gets worse or if your vision starts deteriorating.

Another common symptom - which surgeons often don't tell you about - is "dry eye". Usually it's just a temporary reaction to the post-operative eye drops. If you have dry eye, you may feel itchiness or grittiness, or you may just have an odd sensation of tightness. It will help to avoid air-conditioning and keep off the PC - staring at a computer screen is a common cause of dry eye, even in people who haven't had surgery!

If it's severe, though, it can be painful and it could even affect your vision. Don't panic, there are some very effective treatments available over-the-counter! However if you're still taking the post-op eye drops, don't take over-the-counter drops without asking your doctor first - they might interfere with the prescribed drops.

Once you've finished the prescribed drops, you'll probably find the dry eye gradually settles down over the next few months, as your eye continues to heal. You can buy lubricating eye drops which will help ease the dryness and help healing (a properly lubricated eye heals faster than a dry one). If the problem is really intense, the Tranquileyes eye bath is worth trying.

Ordinary eye drops for contact lenses, sore eyes or redness aren't long-lasting enough - look for products labelled specifically "for dry eye". A few people are sensitive to the preservatives in bottled eye drops - in that case, look for single dose ampoules.

If you're still suffering from dry eye four or five months after the operation, you may be one of the unlucky ones for whom it's a result of the procedure. A visit to your surgeon is in order, but it's likely that you will have to use the lubricating drops long-term.

GenTeal PM Lubricant Eye Ointment for Night-Time and Severe Dry Eye 3.5 Gm
GenTeal PM Lubricant Eye Ointment for Night-Time and Severe Dry Eye 3.5 Gm

If you suffer from dry eye, don't waste your money on ordinary eye drops - they won't help. This ointment is a soothing option for night-time use.

 

Be a Patient Patient!

Cataract surgery may be a walk-in, walk-out surgery BUT it's still surgery, and it takes a couple of months for your eye to fully heal. Be patient with yourself and best wishes for your recovery!

*

All text copyright Marisa Wright. Eye photo by Maschinenraum. Shower photo thanks to Viditu. Mowing the lawn by Jennifer Chernoff.

Comments

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  • Glenn Stok profile image

    Glenn Stok 3 weeks ago from Long Island, NY

    Wow, thanks Marisa. That's an important additional piece of information. And it makes sense – trying to remove a brittle lens. I can see how that can cause trouble. (No pun intended).

    I didn't mention in my prior comment, but my doctor was actually pushing me to get it done sooner. Now I know possibly why. I thought I'd just go until I couldn't deal with it any longer, but I'm glad for your explanation and advice.

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 3 weeks ago from Sydney

    Yes, but only for a short time!

    One thing to note about cataract surgery - delaying it is not necessarily a good thing. Cataracts become more brittle over time. A long-established cataract has more risk of complications than a "young" one. I'm guessing yours are not mature enough to remove yet, but once they are, you shouldn't put it off.

  • Glenn Stok profile image

    Glenn Stok 3 weeks ago from Long Island, NY

    I'm appproching that time in my life. My ophthalmologist says I am probably going to want cataract surgery done within two years based on how it's progressing. So I've been educating myself to be ready.

    I found your article extremely informative and I learned something from you that I didn't read anywhere else — That having to do with avoiding showers and getting water in the eyes after the surgery.

    I am so used to splashing water on my face in the morning, and I realize now that's something I'm going to have to change.

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 7 weeks ago from Sydney

    I suggest you contact your surgeon and ask him, but I doubt it would cause any trouble.

  • profile image

    Ali Li 7 weeks ago

    I accidentally applied eye lubricant ointment to the affected eye 4 days earlier than ordered. Will it cause severe damage to my operated eye? Thank you.

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 4 months ago from Sydney

    Glue is a recognised alternative to stitches. no problem.

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    Neos727 4 months ago

    Thanks for this article. It explains a lot thinks. I went looking for a reason why should not get the eye wet after one of my friends asked "what about if you cry tears will get it wet?!!!"

    I have done the first eye some 10 days ago and the surgeon next day said I am fit to drive and of course all the cautions, don't get it wet for 2 weeks, don't lift heavy things, don't forget the drops, come back in one month.

    I asked questions about how the wound will be fixed. He said no stitches were to be used but glue, which is better safer and quicker. No other explanation.

    Any comments on this glue?

    Neos also from Sydney

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 5 months ago from Sydney

    It's safe to resume most exercise after two or three weeks. I would be a bit cautious about hanging the head below the knees for a bit longer, but there are lots of yoga poses that don't require that - just let the teacher know and if they're any good, they'll be able to suggest alternatives. The eyes should be fully healed after two months.

  • profile image

    cwsmith102016 5 months ago

    I have had cataracts removed from both eyes in the last 5 weeks. I am 50. I am very happy with the results but am not clear on when I can resume all yoga poses. Surgeon specifically told me after 1st surgery not to do poses requiring me to hang my head below my knees but did not tell me for how long and post surgery instructions had no specifics. As many have commented, I think they are so used to dealing with older, possibly less active, people that they just don't give complete instructions to others. I would really hate to mess things up by resuming these activities too soon but am also feeling like a slug after 5 weeks of not practicing yoga. Any advice?

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 6 months ago from Sydney

    That's most people's experience, complications are actually quite rare and most people feel pretty good after the op. As you say, it's a dangerous way to feel as it's very tempting to plunge straight back into daily life! That's the main reason I wrote this article.

  • vmills profile image

    vmills 6 months ago

    You have provided excellent advice in this article. After two successful surgeries, I now have excellent vision and my eyes feel good. So the tendency is to forget that they are still both healing. That could be a costly error. Hopefully, the people who read your article will follow your advice.

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 6 months ago from Sydney

    Nirdicweaver - go back to your surgeon and let them know. It may be debris left over from the operation which is clouding your vision slightly.

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 6 months ago from Sydney

    Patti, I'm so sorry for the delay in replying as I've been on vacation. Yes, it is quite common to get motion sickness when you've had only one eye "done". Take things gently, it probably won't feel better until you get the second eye fixed I'm afraid.

  • profile image

    Nirdicweaver 6 months ago

    I had cataract surgery 3 weeks ago, and on the second eye one week ago. Now my first eye is not as sharp as it first was. It was sooooo clear, but now it's not. I wonder if something is wrong. I can't see anyone over this long Labor Day weekend.

  • profile image

    Patti Ferrell 6 months ago

    is it common to experience nausea like motion sickness when having "one" eye have cataract surgery with a lens implant. Right eye had cataract removed, astigmatism corrected, and Toric lens implant. Things are not clear and for instance when walking the floor seems higher? and it makes me nauseous and dizzy pls advise. Thanks Patti

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 7 months ago from Sydney

    It is possible that the lens has shifted due to the fall. You need to tell the doctors in the hospital that she had just had the cataract op. Also call the eye surgeon and let him know what has happened.

  • profile image

    Lady Tracy 7 months ago

    Omg! My Mother has just had one cataract done and awaiting the other. She is in hospital after a terrible fall and all she keeps saying is she cannot see after this procedure and she deffo cannot I realise now and no one including myself has taken any notice of what she's saying please can you help to guide me in the right direction to sort this out for her. I feel absolutely terrible. Many thanks

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 7 months ago from Sydney

    Yes that's a short time. They are essential to ensure the safety of your eyes so don't worry about it

  • profile image

    Nirdicweaver 7 months ago

    Ciprofloxacin is for one week, and the durozol is tapered down for a month. Then 2 weeks later it's the same thing again for the second eye. Is that still considered a short time period? Please let me know. I read somewhere on the Internet that these drugs enter the body through the tear ducts. And I was afraid of GI problems and things like that. That's what worried me. Thank you for your help. I greatly appreciate it! My first surgery is scheduled for this coming Monday. I hope it goes well.

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 7 months ago from Sydney

    Yes it could cause stress and you should avoid it. However the danger period is only in that first two weeks or so, perhaps you could use an alternative laxative during that period.

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 7 months ago from Sydney

    Taken as tablets, those medications can have side effects - but in eye drops, you're taking a MUCH smaller amount and they are not going through the gut, so the risk of side effects is hugely less. Also you'll be taking them for a very short period of time. If you've had ciprofloxacin antibiotics before and had a reaction, let your doctor know as it would be best to take something else.

  • profile image

    Nirdicweaver 7 months ago

    In addition to the medication reaction question, what about straining on the toilet? Sometimes I have constipation that isn't immediately relieved with stool softeners. Does occasional straining cause any harm? This is just my normal nature.

  • profile image

    Nirdicweaver 7 months ago

    I'm concerned about the eye drops I need to take. Ciprofloxacin and durozol. Do these go systemic that can cause a sever allergic reaction?

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 7 months ago from Sydney

    Here's another "office" lens which might work for you

    http://www.zeiss.com/vision-care/en_de/better-visi...

  • Marisa Wright profile image
    Author

    Marisa Wright 7 months ago from Sydney

    Here's another "office" lens which might work for you

    http://www.zeiss.com/vision-care/en_de/better-visi...

  • Marisa Wright profile image
    Author

    Marisa Wright 7 months ago from Sydney

    Here's another "office" lens which might work for you

    http://www.zeiss.com/vision-care/en_de/better-visi...

  • Marisa Wright profile image
    Author

    Marisa Wright 7 months ago from Sydney

    Annie, I think your specialist and optician are missing an important point - you don't need perfect vision!

    I wear contact lenses and I "need" a 0.5 correction for distance in my right eye. But I don't even wear a lens in that eye any more, because it's a waste of money - I don't even notice the tiny loss of distance vision. So that's what I'd recommend you do - it won't do your eyes any harm. I'm sure you'll find it doesn't bother you in day-to-day living.

    If you want to be really safe, then you could continue wearing your multifocals for driving - just leave them in the car! Or you could look at getting some "sunglass readers" - ordinary sunglasses with a section for reading set into the bottom.

    Now for close vision. There is a new lens designed specifically for office work - they're sometimes called "computer glasses". Nikon do one: http://nikon-lenswear.com/products/e-life-series/h...

    You would wear these at your desk, but when you go outside you'd just take them off and put them in your pocket.

  • profile image

    Annie2016 7 months ago

    I had cataract surgery for both eyes, last eye done two months ago.

    The implant lenses are both for distance.

    Before the cataract surgery, I used to wear progressive eyeglasses, for a decade, with total easiness.

    Now, I need also progressive eyeglasses, just 0.5 for distance, with minus 1 astigmatism and 2.5 for reading.

    I tried to make the eyeglasses at the same shop as before, using the exact the same type of lens as before, and same technology.

    The eyeglasses don't work.

    The middle corridor for intermediate use (computer) is very narrow (one inch, that's all it is).

    Distance is fine, and reading is acceptable. Just intermediate distance is horrible. I have to settle to just see blurry outside the little bubble of clearness. This is very unpleasant as I have to work with two computer screens, and having to communicate with colleagues as well (10 feet away).

    I have been told that I should just keep trying to get used to them.

    I changed the first pair of eyeglasses, as I couldn't get used to them.

    The second pair is better, but still un-wearable.

    After five days of wearing continually the glasses, the state of irritation induced by them was too much to bear (I had to work, too).

    The frame is big and wide.

    I am told I need three pairs of glasses, for each distance, one.

    As I am relatively young (50 years) I cannot see myself walking around with three pairs of eyeglasses around my neck.

    I don't know what to believe/do

  • Marisa Wright profile image
    Author

    Marisa Wright 7 months ago from Sydney

    Nice to hear from you! Yes, you will be amazed at how bright everything looks!

  • Green Bard profile image

    Steve Andrews 7 months ago from Tenerife

    Hi Marisa! I have just been reading this because I will be having cataract surgery towards the end of this month on one eye and the other at some point after that which I will be advised about. Much as I hate operations, I am looking forward to this because it will be so wonderful to see properly again!

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 7 months ago from Sydney

    No, once healed there is no reason why you should limit high intensity exercise.

  • profile image

    kimpassa22 7 months ago

    thanks for your reply Marisa. I know that post surgery I won't be able to do any exercise for a few weeks but I would like to know if long term there is any problem with high intensity exercise?

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 7 months ago from Sydney

    If you are having lens replacement then you need to take exactly the same precautions as you do after cataract surgery. So, no intense workouts or very physical activities for at least two weeks.

  • profile image

    kimpassa22 7 months ago

    I am planning on having lens replacement so that I don't have to wear reading glasses, I am 55. Is there any ongoing problems, after recovering if I am doing very physical activities and intense workouts at the gym?

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 10 months ago from Sydney

    My experience is limited but as I understand it, the reason cataract surgery helps is that the artificial lens takes up less space than the original lens, which will obviously reduce the pressure in the eye. I wouldn't expect it to be a complete cure, though.

  • profile image

    nika36 10 months ago

    Thank you for the quick response :-) Do you have any info about shallow Anterior Chamber and narrow angle glaucoma attack. Will cataract surgery take care of it completely or will she need iridotomy?

    I found some good articles on the net; would like to hear personal experience if anyone has had the condition and what treatment was done. Thank you!

  • Marisa Wright profile image
    Author

    Marisa Wright 10 months ago from Sydney

    Nika, if your mother already has mild cataracts, they are going to get worse as she ages, and she will have to have the operation eventually. Better to have it now than in her seventies or eighties when she may not be so fit.

  • profile image

    nika36 10 months ago

    Thank you Marisa for this extremely helpful article. My mom was recently diagnosed with very shallow Anterior Chamber both eyes and at risk for sudden glaucoma attack. Eye surgeon recommended cataract surgery to alleviate the same. Eye pressure was 14 and vision is good with glasses. She is 68 yrs, hyperopic (+4.00), has mild cataracts and is generally in good health. We are getting one eye cataract surgery done this week.

    Has anyone had a similar condition? Any words of advice or caution? The diagnosis was a surprise and I feel like we panicked and rushed to schedule the surgery. Your input is much appreciated.

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 10 months ago from Sydney

    I'm so sorry Patricia, your comment went to spam for some reason. The "pink haze" is due to swelling of the retina and it's quite common. It should be all settled down by now - if it's not, go back and see your surgeon.

    The loss of peripheral vision is more of a worry. If you had a peripheral vision test at some time before the surgery, it would be good to repeat the test and compare the results. If there really is a difference, I'd say it needs investigation.

  • Patricia Zeal profile image

    Patricia Zeal 11 months ago

    I had my right eye done for cataracts a year ago. Everything went well. JUst had my left eye done 4 days ago with a different doc who is always rushing & so impersonal. I wasn't told to expect a pink glow on everything for a while. They did a poor job of educating people. It boggles my mind why EVERYTHING isn't typed out on paper after doing the darn surgeries for countless years. It's total incompetence and a lack of caring. They even neglected to tell me to remove my contact lens for a week before the surgery. In any event, how long can I expect the pink haze to last? They told me a few days to a week, but I can't rely on anything they say any longer. How common is the pink haze? And why didn't I get it the 1st time?

    I do think though that I have lost some peripheral vision in both eyes after the surgeries. Kinda feels as if the lenses are too small for my eyes. That's the best way I can explain it.

  • Marisa Wright profile image
    Author

    Marisa Wright 12 months ago from Sydney

    Lesley, I've found surgeons are not good at explaining things to patients, and some don't even know themselves! It's why I wrote this article - when my husband had his surgery done, he got such vague instructions I didn't know what to do. I spent hours on the internet and also tracked down a friend of a friend of a friend who was a surgeon, to get the right information.

    As for the dirty water - there is a small risk but you will know if an infection does start, you'll feel and see the inflammation and can go back to the surgery for treatment.

  • Lesley McMahon profile image

    Lesley McMahon 12 months ago

    Thanks for this. There is much information on this page that I was unaware of.

    1) I didn't know I couldnt wash my hair in the shower for a week. I was told not to let water in my eye but thought that was only for the first day or so.

    2) I didn't know about the pc - I'm working on computuers all day (but not this week) but also study online which means a lot of catchup I already need to do.

    3) Yesterday dirty water splashed in my eye and now I'm worried that it may become infected

    4) I didn't know it's best not to do any gardening. I was going to pull out some weeds today. Going to give that a miss now

  • frogyfish profile image

    frogyfish 2 years ago from Central United States of America

    There is so much information - negative and positive - from personal experiences with cataract surgery in the above comments. Your hub was very helpful in description for both pre and post surgery. It does seem that many expectations of patients are not met, and perhaps more education by physicians prior to surgery would absolve some of the questions. Yes, there are risks to any surgery - and one does 'sign away' on that paper before surgery. As an aside, I find Similisan homeopathic eye drops very helpful both for dry eye and allergy eyes. Your hub was much needed and appreciated.

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 3 years ago from Sydney

    Conventional cataract surgery has been around for a very long time and is well-tried and tested but like any operation, there is a risk of complications. Using a laser lowers those risks because it's more precise.

  • profile image

    Canlady 3 years ago

    Thanks Marisa - will definitely do that! Pre-op app't is on Apr 1. And just one other question: I was offered the option of having the surgery (the incision and break-up of the cataract) done via laser. I refused since from what I could determine at the time, there didn't appear to be a great benefit to justify the extra cost. I'm in Canada and the surgery etc are free but the laser isn't considered to be essential for a good outcome and therefore is something you are not covered for. Are you aware of any substantial benefits of going that route? Thanks again!

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 3 years ago from Sydney

    @Canlady, it sounds as though you need to double-check what your other eye will be "set" at - I'm assuming the second eye will be set for distance vision so you can drive, but you need to be certain of that for obvious reasons!!

  • profile image

    Canlady 3 years ago

    Marisa, Thank you for the great info! I'm 54 and had my left eye done just over two weeks ago. It's been a frustrating couple of weeks and the information here has helped me a lot. My doctor was not the chatty type with a "warm and fuzzy" bedside manner! ;) So on my next-day follow-up appointment I told him I was experiencing extreme flickering in my peripheral vision in that eye (almost like looking through a water bubble at the best of times) and when reading it is incredibly distracting. I can't even have a light on in the room on that side of me while watching TV in the evening with out that flicker each time my eyeball moves slightly. His comment was: "oh that should clear up in 3 days to 3 weeks - or it might not. I think sometimes it never really goes away, people's brains just adjust for it." I just about freaked out - I am only 54 not 84 and do not want to have to deal with this for the rest of my life!

    I also was not prepared for not being able to see well enough to drive at night and had never been advised about choosing a focal range - though my vision in that eye is now good at normal (face to face) and mid-range levels and I did, and still do need readers. So your hub and everyone's comments have been so very useful! I am having my second eye done in 3 weeks and in one respect can't wait to have a "marching set" again, but am also still a tad nervous. Fingers crossed all will go smooth with a good outcome. I am enjoying not seeing through a very yellow filter in my left "good" eye, as I still do in my right eye. I had no idea what the real colour of the new paint on the walls of my house was! I quite like it. lol Thanks again. :)

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 3 years ago from Sydney

    Nikita-2, the curtain is not a good sign, and could be a warning of a detached retina. I recommend getting it checked out urgently.

  • profile image

    Nikita-2 3 years ago

    Yesterday I had laser surgery following cataract surgery (on both) eyes about a year ago. The main risk is apparently a detached retina. Could you tell me the signs of that. When I blink I seem to have a thin curtain come down (only sometimes) and I have to blink ferociously to clear it. Is this a sign that something is wrong. Would love some advice from this very useful column. Many thanks.

  • profile image

    Nikita-2 3 years ago

    Thank you Marisa - but may I say what a help I've found this hub - its great to have a go-to site which seems to offer so much sound sense! I guess you could say I've been disappointed by both my surgeon and the optician and I've now changed the latter, who immediately picked up on an irregularity and sent me to a different hospital and as a result the findings of the double vision, the need for laser treatment and the macular degeneration.

  • Marisa Wright profile image
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    Marisa Wright 3 years ago from Sydney

    You're right Nikita. Don't just tell the surgeon what you want, and trust he'll do it right. ASK him to explain what he's going to do, and what your eyesight will be like afterwards. Ask, will both eyes be the same? What will your close eyesight be like? What will your distance vision be like?

    There are so many possible combinations and too often, surgeons play God and think it's OK to decide for you. Ask questions and KEEP asking questions until you understand.

    Cataract surgery won't cause macular degeneration but it's a poor eye surgeon who didn't find it BEFORE the operation. I'd choose someone else for your follow-up surgery!

  • profile image

    Nikita-2 3 years ago

    Make sure that your surgeon understands what result you want. When he asked me what I wanted to be able to do, I said play tennis and do photography. Advised by my optician, I was only having the second eye done to balance it up with the cataract eye. What I came out with was 2 eyes that were totally different and I'd have been better off with only having one eye done. Added to this I've now been told that I need laser treatment on both eyes, also that I have double vision in the non-cataract eye and also macular degeneration. I wonder how much of this was due to the surgery. I hope no one else has this kind of result.

  • profile image

    johnneel 3 years ago

    Thank you for your comments. I will give you an update next week.

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    Marisa Wright 3 years ago from Sydney

    @johnneel, she could argue that if the anaesthetic had been effective, she couldn't have woken - so it's the fault of the anaesthetist.

    I certainly think it's worth a second opinion. It's unlikely a second doctor will give an opinion on whose fault it was. However, you need to know what is the best option for repair.

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    johnneel 3 years ago

    My wife had cataract surgery on both eyes approximately one year ago. She awoke during one of the surgeries, raised up and hit the eye on the optical instrument, dislodging the lens. Another surgery was required to install a new lens which is now larger and distorted ( non circular). She uses a prescribed prednisone eye drop but has much worse vision than she started out with, and continued redness and irritation. So far no improvement over the day of the first surgery. She goes in for another exam Monday. During the first post opp visit, the surgeon indicated it was her fault for waking during the surgery. After a year, is it now time for a second opinion?

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    Marisa Wright 3 years ago from Sydney

    Carol, it can be a bit daunting to read some of the comments - but luckily their experiences are very much in the minority. Your discomfort is very likely dryness - it can actually get quite painful, so get yourself out and buy some moistening eye drops (make sure they're labelled for dry eye, and not just for sore eyes or contact lenses). You should only need them for a few weeks.

    Isn't it great to see clearly again?

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    carol 3 years ago

    2 days after 2nd cataract op

    seeing so well

    amazing discomfort rather than pain and seeing the "crescent" but an annoyance rather than anything else

    fully expect it to clear

    read some comments on various sights about people moaning 3 years on

    ignoring them

    frankly i think the whole thing is a miracle and im so gratful i can se after months of a yellow haze

    be glad and prasie the lord

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    Marisa Wright 3 years ago from Sydney

    It's a difficult decision, I know! It depends entirely on what lenses the surgeon chooses.

    To give you a cautionary tale, my husband decided to choose distance vision, and was told he'd need glasses to read. The reality is that EVERYTHING within three feet is fuzzy. He has to wear glasses to eat, even to see me across the kitchen table (or in bed!). If he'd understood that, he would have made a different decision.

    By far the best option is to go for monovision, where you have one eye set for distance and one for close-up. I know it sounds weird, but it really does work very well. Unfortunately, not everyone is suitable for that option so it comes down to making a choice.

    I suggest you ask your surgeon to specify how many feet you'll be able to see clearly. Don't let him palm you off with a vague answer - remember you're paying him a lot of money, you're entitled to answers.

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    Loretta 3 years ago

    I am near sighted and have cataracts in both eyes. First surgery in June. I am trying to gain insight to choose to keep my near sightedness and have glasses for distance and T.V. etc.

    If I choose this when I wake up at night will I still be able to see the clock, furniture getting to the bathroom?

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    These days when people sue for the slightest thing, consultants always have to be careful to warn of the risks, and there certainly are risks - because all surgery is risky. The procedure is regarded as "safe" which means it's about the same as the original cataract surgery - things can go wrong, but the vast majority of people are in and out in an hour with no problems.

    Ask him what the percentage risk is in this case - if your case is normal, complications are likely to be one in a million.

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    Nicky Guard 4 years ago

    Hi Marisa - a follow up on my visit to the hospital re corneal dystrophy. It turns out that I don't have CD but that there's thickening behind the new lens, which happens in 20% of the population and which can be corrected with laser surgery. But the consultant was very careful to keep telling me there were risks with laser surgery. Do you have any experience of that? I won't be having it for some months. Many thanks and may I say what a help I've found this hub! Nicky

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    Sorry reeree, I haven't heard of those. I'm so sorry they are still struggling to find a solution but so glad that at least they're still trying.

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    reeree 4 years ago

    6 months and they are still trying to get scleral lens right they are still helpul for a few hours a day but causing additional damage. Now I am being told I am a candiate for new multi-focal piggyback lens but these are not done in US- only overseas. Have you heard anything about this and are there any surgeons in your part of the world doing this?

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    Nicky 4 years ago

    Many thanks Marisa - I'll have a look at the site.

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    Oh dear Nicky, I'm sorry to hear you have another problem - but at the same time, at least you know what it is now. I'm not that familiar with corneal dystrophy but this site has a lot of information:

    http://www.cornealdystrophyfoundation.org/

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    @Herbert, I've never heard of the "mass of jewels" phenomenon, so I can't help there. It is certainly possible for your eye to grow a "secondary" cataract so I'd say that's what has happened. It's about the right timeframe. You may need laser surgery.

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    Nicky 4 years ago

    Marisa - a follow up on my earlier post. A friend who is an optician suggested I come and see him to see why my eyesight had changed so much in 5 months since my cataract op - he found it strange that my current optician didn't want to find out why the eyes had change so much. Amazing, it took him less than 10 minutes to find that I have corneal dystrophy in both eyes and he's sending me to another consultant to get a proper diagnosis. He also said that it should've been picked up before my cataract op as the op can make it worse. I do have a condition called sarcoid, so whether this is related or not I don't know. I'll let you know what the outcome is. I had a sense that things weren't right.

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    Herbert C Stubbs 4 years ago

    cataract removed six years ago. The surgeon who removed my old lens said it was a mass of jewels to look at and he removed it very carefully

    He said the mass of different coloured cells were a result of my body trying to repair my lens. Now after six years my eye is once again cloudy. do you link my body is trying to remove the new lens.

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    Great tip! I didn't think of that, but should have - I used to manage a spa tub as part of a big commercial building, and I know what a hotbed (pardon the pun) of germs they can be. In fact I've never set foot in one since, because I've seen how many powerful chemicals are added, to try to keep them germ-free!

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    Dan Harmon 4 years ago from Boise, Idaho

    I had cataract surgery this year for one eye, and will do the other one next month. Your suggestions for post surgery care are spot on with what I was told, but I might make a couple of additions.

    Swimming pools and hot tubs are an even bigger no-no than the shower for the first couple of weeks. Natural hot springs are common where I live and they are absolutely forbidden for a month as were lakes and oceans. Again, it is a matter of bacteria in the water, and these things often contain considerably more than the potable water from your shower.

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    Rita, I don't know eye specialists in other part of the world so I can't help you. Ask your doctor or your optician.

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    rita malhotra 4 years ago

    HI MARISSA

    CAN YOU SUGGEST ANY EYE SPECIALIST WHO CAN I GO TO. BECAUSE I WANT TO TAKE SECOND ADVISE BEFORE I GO FOR THE LASER SURGERY AGAIN AND MESS UP MORE OF MY EYE

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    That is an odd outcome. Definitely go back to your surgeon and ask for an explanation. It may be possible to have lasik surgery rather than another cataract op to improve things.

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    Nicky 4 years ago

    Marisa - many thanks for your comment. No, I mean I can see well for middle distance and the rest of the time I need glasses. I guess you're right I should go back to my surgeon but what can he do other than to do another op and isn't that risky? I'm also a bit disappointed in my optician, who doesn't seem to be interested in the outcome.

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    Hi Reeree, so relieved to hear your vision has improved so much, even if it is at a cost. You've had such a traumatic time! I suggest writing to DoM again, sometimes messages get lost in the spam filter.

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    Reeree 4 years ago

    Hi- back again. Finally got my scleral lens- realize just How Much I've missed seeing in the last year. Now I need only minor driving glasses and +1 reading glass. Still need to work on comfort but finally something helps- these are not a long term solution as they are VERY expensive to get and to maintain on a day to day basis and they do take a lot of work and effort but, for now, at least I can function. I did write to Daughter of Maut but have not receved any further input. Thank you for your long distance support and info.

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    Rita, if you have distance lenses in both eyes, you have to wear reading glasses to see anything close up - to eat, to read, to put on make-up, even to see the face of someone you're talking to. It's a bad idea. So what you have is the best thing - one eye for distance, one eye for close. It's a very normal way to do cataract surgery.

    The tissue from the cataract is a different thing, if it is making your vision cloudy then it needs to be removed. If you're worried, it would be worth seeing another doctor.

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    rita malhotra 4 years ago

    hi Marisa

    when i had catract surgery , we discussed with doctor, that she will put distance lens but when she did surgery I could not see far, I could not drive but i was able to see close clearly, than she did second surgey , than I can see distance fine, when i went back she told me a tissue from catract surgery left, means she had to do laser surgery and when she put the lens in first eye, made mistake in surface, please suggest

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    Nicky, I'm a bit confused. Do you mean you can see well for middle distance but need glasses for both distance and close-up work? Or do you have one eye which can see close up, and one eye which can see long distance?

    If you have one eye for reading and one eye for distance, then that's called "monovision" and it's one of the most common ways of doing cataract surgery. You don't need glasses: you just need to give your brain time to get used to using one eye for distance and one eye for reading.

    If you're still confused, go back to your surgeon and ask him to explain what he's done. You paid him a lot of money, you're entitled to an explanation.

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    Nicky 4 years ago

    I have the same problem as Rita. After cataract surgery I have to wear glasses for watching TV and driving and reading glasses for reading. This is very inconvenient, especially when watching TV or going to lectures as I have to constantly be changing my glasses. My optician said they are far too different to get verifocal glasses and he's never seen such a difference before. What to do?? I feel pretty sick about it, especially as the surgeon and I had discussed what sort of vision I wanted before the operation on both eyes. In fact I only had a cataract on the one eye but I had the other eye done specifically to make them even!!

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    Rita, I strongly advise you to go to another doctor and get his opinion before you get any more surgery.

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    rita malhotra 4 years ago

    HI MARISA WRIGHT

    THANKS FOR GIVING ME ANSWER SO QUICK. MY DOCTOR MADE MISTAKE ON THE SURFACE. AND I AM HAVING A LOT OF PAIN IN MY LEFT EYE, WHICH I HAD SURGERY IN THE MONTH OF JUNE, AND MY DOCTOR WANTS TO DO SURGERY AGAIN ONLY THIS TIME IT WILL BE LASER SURGERY, PLEASE ADVISE

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    Oh dear Rita, it sounds like your doctor didn't understand what you wanted.

    To change it, that would mean another operation and that would be risky. Your best option is to accept what you have, because it is a common method and can be very effective, once you get used to it. It means you don't need to wear reading glasses OR distance glasses very often, if at all. Isn't that a good thing?

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    rita malhotra 4 years ago

    HI

    I HAD CATRACT SURGERY IN BOTH EYE. BUT MY DR. MADE A MISTAKE . I AM SUPPOSED to Have distance lenses so I can see far better without glasses and i can use reading glasses for reading. but after surgery i can see near from one eye and far from other eye. please suggest

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    Nicky, your surgeon is the expert on cataract surgery, not your optician. Go back to the surgeon.

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    Melissa Flagg 4 years ago from Rural Central Florida

    I think I missed part of this conversation. You're saying the eye that had cataract surgery is the eye that needs glasses for reading and distance? If you had a monofocal lens (a standard implant) your eye will most definitely need something for reading and depending on the surgeon, you may need glasses for distance.

    As for the term phaco, I assume your asking about phacoemulsification which is the removal of the cataract by ultrasonic waves. These waves break up the cataract and the fragments are vacuumed out of the capsule. (For further info on the actual cataract procedure, see my hub on cataract surgery.) Your optician should be aware of this and if not, go somewhere else. Phacoemulsification is the standard procedure for removing a cataract.

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    Nicky Guard 4 years ago

    Thank you Marisa and DOM. May I point out that the eye that didn't have a cataract now has the best sight and only needs slight adjustment for reading. Its the eye that had the cataract op for which I need both reading and distance glasses - also this eye has worsened since right after the op - its very strange - its only the non-cataract eye that seems to have the improvement! What to do? My optician isn't very interested - if you remember in an earlier post I asked what phaco....was because the surgeon had recommended that and my optician said no - there hadn't been enough research on it. My surgeon was surprised at this. My optician now denies having said that!! Should I see another optician - my doctor - another surgeon - not quite sure how to complain. But much thanks for all your help.

    Nicky x

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    Melissa Flagg 4 years ago from Rural Central Florida

    Well again, if the measurements taken weren't right, this can happen. She should definitely complain, and I would suggest getting a second, third and fourth opinion! It sounds like the doctor and his staff may not be as experienced as they should be!

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    DOM, I can understand how it's possible to come out of cataract surgery with two eyes "uneven", but Nicky has already had corrective surgery on the other eye and that's made it worse, not better! Clearly, something hasn't gone to plan and it's definitely something to complain about.

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    Melissa Flagg 4 years ago from Rural Central Florida

    @nicky guard That is actually quite common. Once a cataract is removed, the prescription of that eye changes, sometimes dramatically if the calculations for the IOL weren't right. There could be a lot of things wrong right now. You could need laser treatment, you could have a corneal problem, the lens power could be wrong, or even the person who did your prescription might have screwed up. I don't know all the details so I can't really tell you exactly what is wrong. But I can tell you it is not uncommon to come out of cataract surgery with two eyes "uneven" (so to speak).

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    nicky guard 4 years ago

    The optician recommended that I try to get an op on my non-cataract eye in order to even the eyes out - now they're more uneven than they've ever been!!

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    I cannot understand why you'd need an op on your "non-cataract" eye. I recommend you go back to the surgeon and ask for an explanation. This makes no sense.

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    nicky.guard@gmail.com 4 years ago

    Hi Marisa

    Its me back again....I had my cataract eye operated on in January this year and my non cataract eye operated on in February - the latter supposedly to make sure the eyes balanced up. However, now I find that the eyes are very unbalanced - I need glasses on my right eye (the one that had a cataract) for both distance and reading and reading glasses for the left eye. I'm most surprised as I thought they were supposed to be aligning them. My optician says i can't use multifocals (not that I want to or expected to!) because there is such a difference in the eyes. Any advice on what i should do? Should I be happy with the result? its very strange to be watching TV with my distance glasses and find my dinner when I look down is blurry!! Many thanks.

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    Reeree, although cataract operations are very safe by comparison with some other procedures, you are right - like any other operation, things can go wrong.

    Based on your previous posts, it does sound as though you either had complications, or your surgeon made a mistake - and then compounded it by operating on your other eye, when it was clear the first eye had not gone well. That is tragic and I feel for you, but to be fair to other readers, I have to emphasize that it's rare.

    Did you get in touch with Daughter of Maat, who offered to give you some free expert advice?

    http://hubpages.com/@daughterofmaat

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    reeree 4 years ago

    I am still -4 weeka later- having trouble with my new IPSEO progressive eyeglasses. I am now being fitted for SCLERAL contact lens in the hope they will get rid of some of the distortions. Bottom line- surgeons tell cataract patients the vision will be better than before with IOL- that's not so- the vision is very different, especially for younger patients who were severely myopic - and I don't like it. I prefer my cataract vision. Acuidity is not the only parameter to describe how you see and 20/20 is not the same for all.

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    I confess, I always understood the distance lens goes in the dominant eye, too.

    However, what matters is how well you're coping now. At the moment you effectively have one eye for distance and one eye for close up (your near-sighted eye). If you're not getting disoriented by that, it's good news.

    Having said that, my husband was given distance lenses in both eyes. He was extremely near-sighted before the op and for some reason, wasn't suitable for monofocals or multifocals. He was prepared to need glasses for reading, but a year later, he's still frustrated by having to put his glasses on to eat, shave, and even to have a conversation (everything closer than three feet away is a blur). So do cross-question your doctor if he does suggest giving you distance only.

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    NanCee 4 years ago

    Hello,

    I have been very near sighted in both eyes for over 50 yrs. I had a monofocal lens put in my right eye 2 wks ago because of cataracts. My Dr. made it for distance. I need one put in my left eye now but had to put it off for a few wks as I am going on vacation for 3 wks. My Dr. told me to use my eyes together as much as possible while I'm gone and if I can adjust, he will put a lens in for close up. I have been doing it with so so results. I can function all right normally but when I use my camera, which I love to do, I use my left eye. I am left eye dominant. The Dr. office tested me for this and they knew it too! When I asked them why they were testing me I was told that the Dr does the nondominant eye first when both need surgery. Well, I am confused now since I have read that when one eye is made for disstance and one for close up, it is the Dominant eye that is always used for distance as it has something to do with the brain. Does this mean I will have to have both eyes for distance? Will my brain adjust to this if I don't? I am 64 and very used to seeing the world close up but am happy to be able to find the soap in the shower now. lol.

    Thank you in advance for any answer.

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    Steve Andrews 4 years ago from Lisbon, Portugal

    An interesting hub, Marisa! My father had cataract surgery last year and is really pleased with the results. He can see stuff now that he hadn't seen in years!

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    Thank you so much DOM! I hope Reeree will contact you for more information.

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    Melissa Flagg 4 years ago from Rural Central Florida

    @reeree There could be a number of things wrong. The implant could be off center, the implant power could be incorrect, or your glasses prescription could be wrong. In most cases, it's the glasses, but I've seen plenty of cases in the past 16 years where the IOL power was incorrect. You can ask that they be removed, however, I would recommend going to see another physician if your current surgeon can't or won't help you. Generally speaking, if you've never had progressive lenses before it may take a bit to get used to them, but not 3-4 weeks. The eyes and the brain adapt quickly. Feel free to email me for more information, I've been in ophthalmology for eons it seems, and I'd be happy to help you.

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    Melissa Flagg 4 years ago from Rural Central Florida

    That's not actually true. You can have surgery without a lens implant, you can also have surgery with an anterior chamber lens, or a piggyback lens. There are some patients that will not tolerate an implant. These patients end up with coke bottle glasses with powers of (typicaly) +12.00D or +13.00D depending on their prescription beforehand. There are many cases where the capsule holding the organic lens breaks and is unable to hold an implant, and then the iris prolapses making it unable to support an anterior chamber lens. In which case, no lens is implanted. There are a few doctors who will perform a cataract extraction without an implant.

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    reeree 4 years ago

    Update- had left IOL replaced. Now trying to get used to IPSEO progressive lens. being told it could take 3-4 weeks to get ussed to them..I don't be;iev it. 3 days of dizzy, nauseous and throwing up with no better vision. Now I am considering what my options are if I completely remove IOLS. Any info on what happens then? Thanks

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    PETER J. 4 years ago

    JUST HAPPENED UPON THIS SITE. I AM HAVING SURGERY THIS COMING WED. AND READING THIS HAS BEEN A TREMENDOUS HELP. THE THING I FIND SO HARD TO BELIEVE IS THE PRICE OF THE THREE BOTTLES OF EYE DROPS THAT I HAVE BEEN PRESCRIBED. SUPER TINY BOTTLE. SUPPOSED TO BE USED FOR THREE WEEKS. WENT TO COSTCO'S TO GET THE RX FILLED. OVER THREE HUNDRED DOLLARS TOTAL..........WHAT IS IT. LICK GOLD.

    AGAIN. YOU HAVE PUT MY MIND TO REST OVER ALL THE QUESTIONS THE DOCTOR DID NOT ANSWER OR I DID NOT REMEMBER TO ASK.

    AGAIN. no sex for 10 to 14 days. i am in my 70's, but active daily...oh, well, sight before pleasure.

    thanks

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    You can't bend and lift heavy things for two weeks after the op.

    If you can change your duties so you don't have to lift anything, you could go back to work within a day or two, provided you get yourself some safety glasses. Just don't allow yourself to be pressured into doing any heavy work, or thinking, "I'll just lift this one thing, it won't hurt". It could - I've had one comment from a grandmother who ruined the results of her operation, just by lifting up her grandson.

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    Dia 4 years ago

    Im 26 and I was just told I need to get the surgery. Im having a very hard time driving anymore. Actually I dont know how I haven't been in an accident yet. Icant see during the day with the sun and at night headlights bother me.....Im very nervous about it and Im a hairdresser. I stand all day bend lift heavy things and hair flies at me eyes.....how long will Ihave to be off of work??

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    Marisa Wright 4 years ago from Sydney

    It sounds more like first surgeon's incompetence than poor decisions - if he's caused actual damage, you should have a case to sue!

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    reeree 4 years ago

    Finally found surgeon who knows what's wrong. IOL is off center, tilted 20 degress and out of sac on bottom. He replaced Right silicon IOL with acrylic monofocal IOL. Seems acrylic is better and thinner for pateints with higher order cornea aberrations. Unfortunately, damage done made multi-focal impossible but He thinks he may still be able to improve vision- My left eye has simikiar problem but also poor distance vision due to IOL wrong choice of power and my previous LASIK flap was damaged during first cataract surgery so it needs to be repaired. So more surgeries in future thanks to first surgeon poor decisions. I guess this is what happens when surgeons do assembly-like surgeries and make the same decisions for all

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    I've never heard of reading glasses "burning your retina". Unless you have some other eye condition, it sounds unlikely - but you could try consulting another optometrist, just to be sure.

    You don't have to buy reading glasses from an optometrist anyway. The ones sold in drug stores are just as effective. Because they're so much cheaper, you can buy a few at different strengths, so you have one at +2.5 for everyday and a stronger pair for the occasional tiny print.

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    blind 5 years ago

    Hi

    I had catarct surgery on both eyes about 12 mths ago. All went well, except now I need really strong glasses for reading. My prescription is +2.5, but I still can't read anything smaller than the newspaper (eg instructions on medicine bottles, ingredient lists on jars, the map of the New York subway). My optometrist said that a stronger prescription will 'burn my retina' and refused to increase the strength. Can this really happen? What are the pros/cons of stronger glasses? FYI- i am 36 yrs old. Thanks

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    @reeree, at least you have an explanation now. What's the point of taking the glaucoma drops if they're making your vision worse? Is there some other benefit to them?

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    reeree 5 years ago

    Seen atJohn Hopkins Hospital. Not only are my IOLs 2 mm off center but the edges have become completely opaque. I not only see the edges of the lens but am looking through a cloudy lens all the time. Been put on Glacoma eye drops permanently to keep pupils constricted- I am concerned about this as I do not have high eye pressure and the drops make me dizzy and cause additional clouding of vision. Still no response to what to do -no one wants to risk exchange of lens and no one can give me eyeglassses that help. So I will continue to search for answers.

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    Great tip, Sharon, thanks!

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    Sharon 5 years ago

    I've read where several of the folks have posted have mentioned dry eyes after having cataract surgery. So, I thought I would share something that has really helped me. My eyes were so dry after having the surgery, that by each evening, I was pretty much shot. I've started taking 2T of flaxseed oil every day. One T. in the morning and one in the evening. It has relieved my sysmptoms by at least 70%. I also make sure I've always got sunglasses on when I'm outside and airvents in the car are turned out of my face. The flaxseed oil has been amazingly helpful.

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    Nicky, sounds like you did the right thing without knowing it, so

    So your surgeon just shrugs his shoulders and says "I don't know?" You paid him a lot of money - don't settle for the brush-off! Ask him if it could be the edge of the lens you're seeing? Ask him is he sure there's no retinal detachment? Ask him what other tests he could do,to find the cause of the problem?

    A lot of people imagine they'll be able to see perfectly after a cataract op, but it's not the case - unless you have a perfectly placed multifocal lens, it's likely you'll need glasses for some things. You may not need varifocals, though - try buying some cheap reading glasses (they're perfectly safe for your eyes). And ask him to explain why you would need glasses for night driving and not day driving!

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    Nicky 5 years ago

    Hi Marisa. I unfortunately had very little guidance - I had to work out how to deal with the imbalance in vision in my eyes - using a patch over the glasses of the new eye and then finally realising that I could wear a contact lens in my old eye and reading glasses over the top of it. No one seems to know why I've got the dark rim. Interestingly I went private and a friend went with the NHS, same day, same time and had far better treatment!! Is the change in my vision what can be expected - I'm afraid I had expected better vision after the op??

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    Nicky, the Crystal lens is fairly new - I understand it's a fixed lens, not multifocal, but your own eye muscles can bend the lens, which adjusts the focus so you can read.

    Your surgeon should have told you not to read without reading glasses for the first few weeks, as it's best not to bend the lens too much while your eye is healing.

    Your eye is healing so watering isn't surprising. The dark outer rim doesn't sound normal though - you should go back and ask your surgeon about it.

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    Nicky 5 years ago

    I've now had my cataract corrected eye checked by my optician and he says that I will still need to wear verifocals for some things such as reading and night driving and that this is the only way I will get excellent vision. I'm a little disappointed although my sight in that eye has improved from 5.50 to +2 - maybe this is normal. However, my eye is watering a lot and I also have a dark outer rim to my vision on the outside edge of my eye. Can anyone explain that?

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    Misty 5 years ago

    I had crystal lens put in two years ago. I just had a secondary cataract removed in my left eye and am having the same proceedure done on my right eye next week. My left eye is very clear but feels achey and I see floating shadows. My doctor says this is normal. Has anyone had a seconday cataract removed? What was recover like?

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    Saltyal 5 years ago

    I had the cataract surgery done with phacoemulsification, same as most people nowadays, and Calhoun light-adjustable IOL's installed on November 28 & 29 for left & right eyes respectively. Then 2 weeks later (allows time for the eye to heal from surgery)I had a refraction done & underwent the adjustments (see my previous posts for explanation) to provide blended monovision. The adjustments took less than 2 minutes per eye! .... 2 days after that I had another refraction done, which showed my visual acuity was as good as it gets considering my right corneal damage. (20/30 right, and spectacular 20/15 left) So the opthamologist did a "lock-in" procedure that day (again with the focused ultraviolet light @ less than 2 minutes/eye)...... 2 days after that I had the final lock in and its been hunky-dory ever since..... There never was an issue with getting my IOL's sorted out, it was just a matter of going through a little different process than those with the more conventional lenses. It hasn't been a worrying experience for me, but rather a positive one.

    It may be that your optician isn't up to date on the latest procedures used in cataract surgery, so expressed unwarranted concern over the phacoemulsification, by wrongly thinking it had something to do with a new way of correcting astigmatism.... its now the most common method of removing the cataract...

    Keep in mind that the much respected optician's profession focuses (little pun!) on dispensing corrective lenses, so they won't usually have the training or expertise required of an optometrist or opthamologist, and their opinion shouldn't weigh too heavily against the doctors .... that would be like taking the plumbers advice vs the urologists!

    Cheers,

    Al

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    Nikita-2 5 years ago

    Saltyal. Thank you for your comment - when you say 'later' do you mean later in the same operation or at another time? Good luck with getting your IOLs sorted out. It must be very worrying but maybe it was that procedure that my optician wasn't too happy about as it can be a bit tricky?

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    Saltyal 5 years ago

    Nikita-2:

    Phacoemulsification is just the procedure for removing the cataract..... a tiny ultrasonic probe is inserted into the lens capsule to break up the lens into microscopic particles which are then suctioned out by the same probe, then the new lens is installed through the inciscion. Astigmatism is corrected later by reshaping the cornea with laser or micro-scalpel, or in my case, by microscopically adjusting the shape of the IOL by means of focused ultraviolet light.

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    Nikita-2 5 years ago

    Marisa - When I had my cataract done the surgeon offered me an 'add=on' of a treatment called Phakoemulsificaation - he described this to me as something to fix the astigmatism. At the time I didn't know the clinical name and I asked my optician whether he'd recommend the correction for the astigmatism - he wasn't keen as he felt there hadn't been sufficient research on it, so I didn't have it done. I now find that there was a mis-communication between us and he said he hadn't said that at all. Do you know what phako........... does and what I've missed out on.? My surgeon was surprised by what my optician said. I am now very confused and worried that I wasn't given the whole story and good advice.

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    Welcome Nikita-2. It is difficult coping in that in-between month!

    Throw away the glasses (or better, donate them to charity). They're no use to you now. Put a patch over the unoperated eye, and buy yourself some cheap reading glasses (even the cheap ones won't harm your sight in any way).

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    Nikita-2 5 years ago

    ny Marisa, I've just joined your very helpful hub after having had cataract surgery on my right eye last Friday 3 days ago. I'm now very frustrated with my vision as the operation for my left eye is not for another month and I don't know how to handle my sight. I wear verifocal glasses and now have the problem of not being able to see with my glasses on, nor with them off and the effect is making me feel dizzy and very tired. Would you recommend putting a patch over the operated eye (i.e.over the lens of my glasses on the right side) or should I put a patch over my un-operated eye (i.e.the glasses lens of my left)? Should I be making the newly operated eye work so that it can adjust?

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    Saltyal 5 years ago

    Update after back to back cataract surgery on November 28 & 29.... I had Calhoun light adjustable IOL's put in, then adjustments to both lenses on Dec 12, followed by "lock-in" treatment on Dec 14 & 16.. Prior to adjustment on the 12th my visual acuity with the new lenses was 20-40 right, and 20-25 left, which is 1 line better than where I was before cataracts developed. After adjustments I'm now at 20-30 right eye (not perfect due to corneal scarring from old trauma) and 20-15 left, nearly as good as my youth, when I was 20-10 both eyes! I opted for monovision and I'm real happy I followed the surgeon's recommendation to do that with my right eye as the "reading" side. It works fine for reading the print on food cans, brief computer work etc, but too much eyestrain for extended reading, so I use reading specs for longer sessions. Here's a link explaining some of the light adjustment process; most of it's like my experience but I didn't use the dark glasses as the clear ones block the same amount of UV...... http://video.osnsupersite.com/video/Evaluation-of-... or if your browser has trouble with that, try http://www.premiersurgeon.com/index.php/light-adju... ...... needless to say, it's been a very positive experience, but expensive @ $2800 per eye.

    Cheers,

    Al

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    Fuzia, unfortunately dry eyes can be a side effect and it can be long-lasting. I don't know why your doctor recommended Refresh drops - they're for mild symptoms only and pretty useless for your problem.

    There are several eye drops for moderate to severe dryness. Some brand names are Systane, Celluvisc, TheraTears. They really do help.

    You may have to use them several times a day at first, but with time you should be able to cut back.

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    fuzia 5 years ago

    I am 42 years old and I had a cataract surgery in march 2010 but my eye still burns and itching the doctor said it was because of dryness so the doctor recommended that I took refresh lubricated eye drops but it doesn't not help so do you have anything that can help me please email me on

    fahd-tiger@hotmail.com or comment here

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    @reeree, if you have secondary cataracts, that changes the whole game. But I'm concerned about the comment by the second surgeon - it's often something they say when they don't want to criticize a colleague.

    I would try to get another opinion. I think you also need to be more assertive with your surgeon. When he says something you don't understand, ask him to explain!

    Write down a list of your questions and take them with you next time. I can think of several already:

    Why did you decide on single vision lenses?

    When I talked about disorientation you said it was "a sensory thing" - what does that mean?

    What effect are the secondary cataracts having? Can I have them removed before you do any other work?

    Why is my distance vision so poor if my implants are for distance? Other people with distance lenses can see distance perfectly?

    And so on. Think about each one of his answers and steel yourself to keep on asking until you're satisfied. Take someone with you if you need moral support.

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    reeree 5 years ago

    Marissa-Thanks for your response. As of last night, my reading vision is +3 and my mid vision is +2.75. My distance vision is now 20/70 with no depth perception. I have significant 'secondary cataracts' which will need to be removed. The surgeon wants to discuss PRK to improve distance vision and then LASIK to improve overall sight. I'm really not sure this is possible with corneas that are thin from previous LASIK. I just casn't understand why I feel so disoriented just moving around my world and I have a greatd deal of difficulty in stores, possibly due to the flourescent lights? My surgeons comment was "it's a sensory thing" and I guess that should appease me but I'm not settling until I am comfortable. I am looking for other opinions as well but 1 surgeon already said since it was started by someone else, he was reluctant to do anything. Does anyone know good cornea surgeons?

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    @Reeree, I'm so sorry. And I'm sorry you ended up with an old-fashioned surgeon who thinks patients should do what they're told and don't need to be informed!

    Reading is obviously not your problem, because that's easily solved by a cheap pair of reading glasses at the right strength. Most people over 60 need glasses to read anyway, so that's not a big deal. The problem is your middle and distance vision.

    With distance lenses, your distance vision should be stunningly clear - so there is something more wrong here than just the wrong choice of lens. Can you get a second opinion?

    My husband also ended up with single focus lens distance lenses, but they don't sound as bad as yours. His middle distance vision is OK, but he needs reading glasses to see anything within a metre (just over a yard). He found that very hard to get used to at first. He now has an assortment of cheap reading glasses at different strengths for different purposes. What makes up for it is his wonderful distance vision - after years of being very near-sighted, he can finally enjoy the scenery.

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    reeree 5 years ago

    Marisa- had other eye done and surgeon unilaterally decided to put in same lens in left eye as right eye Both are distance only, single focus lens and I hate them. I cannot get used to them- I feel as if I cannot function just walking around the environment as my mid vision is so poor. I am thinking of having the lens exchanged for multi-focus lens. My surgeon said last week he should have done these lens to begin with given my "unique need to read so much", even considering having them removed all together.

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    Lisa, I'm a bit confused by this one! Yes, a cataract makes the lens cloudy so colours look muddy and dull. You get used to that, so when you have the op done, suddenly the whole world looks like technicolour!

    It's only the big change that makes it look so bright - actually you're just seeing the same colours you used to see before the cataract.

    So you see, there shouldn't be any difference between the colours she sees with her left eye and the colours she sees with her right eye, if her right eye is normal. It sounds like there may be an early cataract in the right eye, too, and the surgeon thinks it's not worth fixing yet.

    I suggest you ask the surgeon when she goes for her check-up. But it is amazing what the brain can adjust to, so I'm sure it will settle with time.

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    Lisa C 5 years ago

    Hi Marisa. My mother has just had cataract surgery 36 hours ago in the left eye only - the right eye is fine and doesn't need it. As only the left eye has been done, there is a colour difference between what both eyes can see now. I'm assuming that this will settle in the next day or so. She is saying that grey is blue, red is pink and white is luminous! Her surgeon hasn't really given her any info on what to expect regarding colours so I wondered if you could confirm this will settle once the brain re-adjusts. Thanks!

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    Sorry, I don't know whether "most" surgeons would be happy to leave it that long. It's possible it varies with the individual, so I would say you have to go with his advice. You could try printing out the article I linked to and taking it to him - maybe it will prompt him to give you some more information.

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    c barnes 5 years ago

    Hi marisa thanks for the feed back,will ask my surgeon ,I would be ok to wait for 6 months to see if it gets better but my surgeon says if I want it out he needs to do it within 3 months of the op ,as after that time its difficult to remove due to the lens attatching itself to the capsular bag ,do you know if most surgeons are happy to leave it for 6 months ,thanks for your help

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    C Barnes, I've been doing some more research on this.

    The first thing to know is that you're not alone. The shimmering effect, called Positive Dysphotosia, is becoming more common after cataract surgery and surgeons aren't sure why.

    One thing they do know is that "the incidence appears to be worse in the most recent intraocular lenses, which are engineered with square posterior edges". I suggest you ask your surgeon whether the MPlus is one of those lenses - it is very new so it's quite likely. So if you could get a replacement lens with rounded edges instead, you'd have more chance of getting rid of the problem.

    Many people find the problem decreases over time as the lens "beds in". For that reason, some surgeons suggest waiting 6 months before having a lens exchange.

    http://www.eyeworld.org/article.php?sid=392&st...

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    c barnes 5 years ago

    hi marisa ,had a second opinion but they only said that the eye was ok and the lens was ok ,my surgeon said its just one of those things and there is no explanation for the problem as everyones eyes are different ,I have to make the decision to have it removed within the next week he says i may have the same problem with a monofocul ,so it seems a toss the coin for the decision as i dont have any facts to consider .

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    Sam 5 years ago

    Hi, i just need to know whether the catract surgery also corrects nearsighted vision?

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    c barnes 5 years ago

    hi as mentioned previously I had the m plus lens fitted 8n weeks ago and its been driving me mad ever since with constant fluttering /shimmering/twitching at the left side of my eye only dissapearing in a dimley lit room ,I had an examination and whilst waiting for my eye to dilate the problem went away ,does anyone know how i can dilate my eye so i can observe if this makes the problem any better ,my surgeon has given me the option to remove the lens and replace with monofocul but says i may have the same problem ,I wouldn't advise anyone to take a risk on these lenses

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    George Tucker 5 years ago

    I had surgery on the right eye in July and the left eye in Sept. Although both surgeries were a success, I had a difficult time in between both surgeries with dizziness and imbalance. The brain just could not adjust to the discrepancy of one good eye and one bad eye. Once the second surgery was done, I was A-OK!

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    Marc-M 5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

    Hi All! I know a few people that have been "set-up" with monovision and have gotten used to it very well. The human brain does adjust to all sorts of strange situations :-)

    -It's now 3 wks since cataract surgery on my R-eye & my L-eye won't be done until mid-Jan 2012. My brain is slowly managing to adjust with a better-than-perfect 20/15 R-eye and a very poor & blurry L-eye. I was a little discouraged at 1st, but feeling better now that my brain is compensating for this irregularity in my sight.

    Like I mentioned in my earlier (long) post, my near vision has suffered though. I purchased 2 different pairs of reading glasses to use for different distances and I'm coping quite well. After my L-eye is done, I'll finally be able to get some graduals made. Best of luck to all who will be getting cataract surgery & to those who are re-couping from recent surgery! Marc

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    Yes, Colleen,that's a very common method, it's called monovision. If the surgeon gave your mother lenses that were good for distance vision, she wouldn't be able to read without glasses. With monovision, she'll be able to read with one eye and see distance with the other. It sounds weird, but the brain gets used to it very quickly and it works well.

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    colleen 5 years ago

    my mother just had cataract surgery. Prior to surgery, she was far-sighted. Her vision has improved overall but she now has one eye far-sighted and one near-sighted. Have you ever heard of this? could it be caused by some mix up with the replacement lense?

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    Cherie Ann, the time between surgeries is difficult as there's such a difference between the two eyes. The only silver lining is you won't have to put up with it for long, just hang in there!

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    LizD 5 years ago

    @Hi-I also have cataracts due to Seroquel (quetipine). At 44 I'm considered young, too. My first surgery is two days from now. My doctor didn't say that this will be a more difficult procedure.

    Many younger people do deal with cataracts due to lots of reasons so you're not so alone.

    Cataracts caused by Seroquel are now considered a real complication in humans, not just beagels.

    I have 40 years left in my life, hopefully. I expect that advances will be made so that people will have a good chance of retaining their vision if problems do arise.

    I don't know anyone else on Seroquel with cataracts, so I'll post after my surgery.

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    Cherie Ann 5 years ago

    I had cataract surgery on my left eye 5 days ago. Every thing seemed to go fine and I do have really clear vision in that eye. However, my right eye is not going to be done for another four weeks and meanwhile I am somewhat dizzy and have that flickering on the left side of my eye that has been described as migraine. I have had migraines all my life so that makes sense. I feel quite disoriented with the right eye being so out of focus and the left being so clear. I have a follow-up visit on Friday and hope the doc can reassure me that the flickering and dizziness will disappear eventually.

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    Reeree, I'm so sorry you've had such a bad experience. A drooping eyelid is not normal as far as I know. You might want to consider getting a second opinion - one of my neighbours had this symptom and it was damage caused by the negligence of the surgeon.

    Do you know what type of lens the surgeon used?

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    Marc, your post could've been written by my husband! He has the same problem. After years of needing strong glasses for distance vision, but being able to take them off and read close up, he finds it very frustrating that he can't see me across the dinner table! The fabulous colours and his ability to enjoy scenery do compensate, but he does get annoyed with it still.

    You will feel unbalanced until you get the second eye done, you could just consider wearing an eye patch?

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    Marc-M 5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

    Glad I came across this thread! I am a 52 male diagnosed with cataracts in June of 2010. Last week (Oct 12-2011),I had cataract surgery on my R-eye. The implant is an Alcon AcrySof IQ model SN60WF with a power of 19.5D. I am one that hates having someone playing around in my eyes, but I was very pleasantly surprised and amazed how well it all went. 10 minutes max in the OR! No pain before,during and after the surgery. The pre-op "freezing" drops did cause some short duration burning and that's it. The next day, it felt like I had an eyelash in my eye, but that seems to be a normal occurrence and according to my Doc, this should quickly disappear and it did the very same afternoon. My 1st post-op eye test went very well. I could identify most of the very smallest letters even though I had some haziness in my operated eye. The doc told me that could take up to 2 wks to get better and was caused primarily by some remaining medicine injected into the eye during during surgery. In 3 days, I could see clearly again as in most patients. I can't believe how white the whites are and how bright colors are. I now see some details I never saw before. Even my cat's fur looks way different than it did a week ago. One problem I'm having now is the "unbalanced" vision due to my bad left eye. I popped the R-lens out of my frame but still need my glasses.Even with my glasses on, I have double/triple vision,see starbursts and halos around lights and very blurry vision overall out of my L-eye. My L-eye surgery is only scheduled for Jan 11-2012, so I have to learn to function with this "handicap". My R-eye far vision is un-real - almost "bionic" ! I feel like I can see like a hawk now. Problem is, anything under 65" such as a wall calendar (yes I did measure!) gets increasingly blurry as I get closer. Over 65", my R-eye performs very well and all is clear beyond that. Just under 65", I see pretty good with 1.25 reading glasses but probably would do better with 1.0 but I cannot find any in town. When I'm within a normal reading distance (approx 16") I need 2.25 or 2.5 reading glasses. In between those distances I would need between 1.25 & 2.5 reading glasses. Graduals will most likely be the answer. When sitting at the table, my wife looks blurry (she's about 40" away). I read that it could take awhile for your eye & brain to learn to use your "new" lens. Alternating viewing between close, intermediate & far objects will actually teach your eye to work with its new "friend". I've been at my computer for a couple hours now. When I sit back 36" from my screen and close my left eye , I can see my screen almost perfectly !!! AS a matter of fact, I typed this comment without any glasses! When I switch to an object 6 feet away, I can see that my eye takes a little more time to "lock in" but it DOES! Last Saturday, I couldn't have done this ! I know that I'll have to wear glasses for near distances once all is said and done in Jan 2012 and will just have to learn to adjust to the situation. I will continue doing my eye "exercises" as I explained and hopefully this will minimize my reading lens prescription. At least my life will be clear & colorful so that I can enjoy nature & life around me like it was meant to be. Good luck everyone and please do not hesitate to opt for cataract surgery if it is suggested! You won't regret it ! Marc :-)

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    reeree 5 years ago

    I agree- I am in my 40's and developed cataracts in both eyes within 4 months- no reason. I feel the surgeons all respond as if we are like the majority of surgeries-older people who are already retired and most interested in returning to golf games so they fail to ask what the needs of younger patients are. I had right eye done 7 weeks ago and now have terrible near and middle vision, poor distance vision, no depth perception, been thru 6 pairs of eyeglasses and am told I already need YAK 6 weeks after surgery which has to wait until 3 months post surgery to do.and feel my concerns about poor vision overall as well as eye pain, looking thru a 'veil', headaches and droopy eyelid are all ignored- it will go away Eventually maybe. I am having other eye done this week-have no choice but this time insisted on an accommodating lens in the hope this will give me back better vision (I had 20/20 after Lasik 15 years ago and I will not settle for "just get used to bifocals" after what all the surgeries have cost. Oh well- hope the second surgery is better than the first but am not happy right now and would happily take back the cataract vision.

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    Hi 5 years ago

    I am 29 with posterior subcapsular cataracts (PSCs) diagnosed when I was 27. They are likely the result of antipsychotic medication, probably quetiapine, which has been proven to cause cataracts in beagles. I've done a bit of my own research would caution anyone who is not a licensed eye doc from offering unqualified encouragement to get the surgery, especially to people my age, as we frequently have this different kind of cataract (PSC) that is easier to remove but can also be somewhat mitigated without surgery. I have dilating drops that enable more light to enter my eye, for example. The fact is, however, that young people have a longer time to live ahead of us, and we don't need to spend the latter of it blind because of an early surgery that caused a retinal detachment. The risks for us are not well-documented as they are for older people who only have to live twenty years post surgery. What happens after thirty years?! No one can say. I'm -8 micrometers in each eye and auras and light sensitivity are one thing, but blindness and shrunken eyes are entirely less enticing.

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    JANICE 5 years ago

    My husband had cataract surgery last friday and has only blurred vision now. Is this OK or should he have perfect vision? From reading this it seems everyone has wonderful vision within 24 - 48 hours.

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    Chezvous22 5 years ago

    Hi C Barnes, When my eyes were first done the movement was really awful but it does get better. I found it was really bad when I tried to read lying down as I could barely see to read with all the movement. I had my surgery done on the first eye a month ago on Tuesday and although it is still there a little sometimes, it has improved a lot. I have read a lot of posts where people have said that this happens and all seemed to say it gets better. Hope this helps.

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    c barnes 5 years ago

    hi has anyone had the m plus lens fitted just had my left eye done 10 days ago and the flickering /fluttering from the left hand side is driving me mad ,will it go away or do i have to think about explanting it ??

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    Saltyal 5 years ago

    Marisa, they "adjust" the lenses post-op by microscopic application of a computer controlled UV light source through the dilated pupils: that subtly changes the shape of the polymerized lens structure without any physical contact.... when Dr & patient are satisfied after a series of these adjustments, the lenses are " locked in" and subsequent UV exposure makes no more changes to the lens structure.... Like you, I'm hoping someone here has some experience with this procedure.

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    @Chezvous, I know two people who have multifocals and love them.

    The thing with multifocals is that when they work, they're fantastic - but when they go wrong, they're horrible. So unless your surgeon has really extensive experience in implanting them, it's a big risk to go with multis.

    Having a surgeon who's been in the business 30 years can be a disadvantage, because older surgeons are often reluctant to use the latest lenses. My husband's first specialist (who's also been in the business 20 years) didn't even handle multifocals. His second specialist did, but because of his degree of astigmatism, he wasn't suitable for them.

    I haven't heard of them being adjusted post op either. I can't imagine designing a procedure so that you've got to go back into such a delicate area with a second incision and a second lot of stitches - sounds risky to me.

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    @Chezvous, I know two people who have multifocals and love them.

    The thing with multifocals is that when they work, they're fantastic - but when they go wrong, they're horrible. So unless your surgeon has really extensive experience in implanting them, it's a big risk to go with multis.

    Having a surgeon who's been in the business 30 years can be a disadvantage, because older surgeons are often reluctant to use the latest lenses. My husband's first specialist (who's also been in the business 20 years) didn't even handle multifocals. His second specialist did, but because of his degree of astigmatism, he wasn't suitable for them.

    I haven't heard of them being adjusted post op either. I can't imagine designing a procedure so that you've got to go back into such a delicate area with a second incision and a second lot of stitches - sounds risky to me.

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    Chezvous22 5 years ago

    Hi Saltyal, I heard the multifocals cause halos at nighttime as well and that they are difficult to get used too. I decided not to go with them for that reason However, a lot of people say they are great. I haven't heard about them being adjusted post op either so it will be interesting to hear how that goes. Also how soon post op? I found my eyesight was not quite right for about 2 weeks anyway because of the swelling etc.

    Marisa I think you are correct about the compromise and I am going to ask him about that when I see him next. It seems you take a gamble no matter what you choose and you can only hope for a 100% result. I guess even though I knew I would need reading glasses I didn't take into account that would need them to read most things up close. I trust my specialist as he has been in this area for 30 years and has a fantastic reputation.

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    @Chezvous, if you go for fixed distance lenses, the specialist has to make a call what to fix it at. For my husband, the specialist decided to give him perfect distance vision so he can see scenery beautifully - but the trade-off is that he needs glasses not just for reading, but for anything within three or four feet. So he has to wear glasses to eat, and even to see someone's face when he's having a conversation!

    It sounds like your specialist may have gone for a compromise so you've got perfect middle distance vision, which means your far vision isn't as good - but your near vision isn't as bad.

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    Saltyal 5 years ago

    Thanks for the feedback.... sorry to hear your night vision is worse; do you know what's the cause? ...... Could it be that the torics didn't get perfectly placed? ( My reading seems to indicate getting the alignment right is pretty tricky)... Dr's advised me away from multifocals due to higher reported incidence of stars & haloes at night, which would defeat part of the purpose of the op..

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    Chezvous22 5 years ago

    Hi Saltyal, My poor night vision was the reason I had my eyes done. I have monovision lenses both of them Toric Lenses and I need glasses for fine print. I don't know anything about the ones you have mentioned. My experience has been that in actual fact I think I will probably still have to wear glasses full time because I am constantly on the comuputer, my job entails close study of plants and even when I shop I have to put my reading glasses on to read the labels, so I always have to make sure I have my reading glasses with me. I also feel that I can't quite see far distance but my middle vision is really good. I can drive the car perfectly well in the day time but I am finding once night falls if I am outside or driving my vision is very, very poor, much worse than before I had the new lenses put in. I am really disappointed with this outcome and I go back to the specialist next Wednesday for another checkup. My specialist has been away since I had the op and I have been seeing another specialist in the practice for any problems I have had. When you have this operation there are no guarantees that you will not have to wear glasses again so you need to keep that in mind. I wish now that I had taken the risk and got multifocal lenses. Overall, I am quite happy because it is amazing what you can see, everything is so clear. It's comparable to looking through really dirty windows and then someone cleaning them, everything is so sparkly. Hope this helps.

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    Saltyal 5 years ago

    Thanks for this Hub! ..... I have early stage cataracts which greatly affect my night vision due to glare. Because I work for Coast Guard in Search & Rescue, part of my job is working outside in the weather at night, so spectacles are a big hassle (rain etc on the lenses limits my value as a searcher)...My opthamologist says I'm an excellent candidate for Light Adjustable Lenses, he would install them to provide monovision, and adjust them post-op to eliminate my minor astigmatism (yes, adjust the lenses in situ, not affecting the corneas) so I'd probably only need specs for fine print....I'm scheduled for the procedure end of November.... Anyone have experience with these (Calhoun)lenses and recovery/adjustment period?

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    @Chezvous, I'm so glad it's nothing serious. My husband also had dry eye, though not as severe as yours. It can be very painful AND it affects your vision, so you should find you see better with the gel or drops.

    The dry eye can continue for a long time after you stop taking the prescription drops, so it will take patience, hang in there!

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    Chezvous22 5 years ago

    Hi, saw the specialist today and he said there is no infection and no displacement of the lens. The right eye is still healing and still may take more time. He said that the eyes can get very dry with all the use of the prescription drops and this can cause the type of pain I am experiencing. He recommended to get over the counter GenTeal Gel or GenTeal Drops from the chemist. I got both and tonight I used the gel and it seems to have done the trick. I guess I will just have to be a little more patient. My left eye is like I have not had anything done to it at all and I could see an extra line on the eye chart today.

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    Chezvous22 5 years ago

    Hi Marisa I have an appointment tomorrow as there is no specialist in today. I lent over last night and some fluid spilled out of my eye and it feels like the lens is moving all the time. Just after it happened I felt like I could see a lot better. The left eye feels fine but the right eye is definitely not right. Today is the first day though that I haven't taken any pain killers but the eye still feels gritty very much like when you put a contact lens in the wrong way. I'm writing this in this forum because when I was researching cataract surgery I found peoples comments really helpful. I was really hoping I wouldn't be one of the ones who had a bad experience but there have been a few days when I wished I had never had it done. I also went out one night last week and my night vision didn't seem that good. I just thought that maybe my eyes were still swollen or something. However, when I went for a walk on dusk last night I could barely see. The main reason I had this surgery was so I could see better at night time as I found it very hard to drive especially on a rainy night. I will post again after I have been to the specialist.

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    @Chezvous, it's not normal to have pain so long after surgery and certainly not "sharp pain...like a knife sticking in it".

    Go back to your specialist. and insist he investigates. Make sure he understands how bad it is - tell him you need constant painkillers and mention the "knife" comparison.

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    Chezvous22 5 years ago

    Hi, I had cataract surgery 3 weeks ago on my right eye and 2 weeks ago on my left eye. I have not found this to be an easy operation. I still take panadol most days as I have some pain in my eyes. At the end of the first two weeks I went back as I just wanted to rip my eyes out of my head as they felt like they were on fire. The eye specialist said that it could have been pressure in the eyes but by the time I got to see him my eyes were just starting to feel better and he said that the pressure was normal. He also said I have 20/20 vision and that I was lucky. My eye specialist gave very strict instructions about lifting and said nothing heavier than a kilo for 3 weeks. I was also told absolutely no gardening for 6 weeks and my partner and I have a nursery so we have had to hire another person in the meantime to take over my workload which I didn't count on. As I said this operation has not been all hunky dory and I just expected to go back to work pretty soon after it. I have a sharp pain every now and then in my right eye that feels like a knife sticking in it, it almost feels like I can feel the lens. I still don't feel 100% but I guess it takes time to heal. Every day it gets a little better though. On the bright side, I can't believe the colours red is sooo red and yellow is so so yellow. I didn't even realise I couldn't see colour that well. I don't know if I would do this operation again if I had the choice. Everyone says it's a breeze but I haven't found this to be the case.

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    @Julius, thanks for that important information. As you say, considering how common the problem is, I'm amazed the surgeon didn't think to check. I am so sorry you had such an awful experience.

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    Julius 5 years ago

    I had an eye op. for cataracts almost two years ago. At the pre-med preparation I had to give a list of any medication that I was taking. At the top of the list I put Finasteride (a prostate shrinking drug).

    Halfway through the op. the surgeon said almost alarmingly "Are you taking prostate drugs!?". No more was said at the time, but after a few days that eye appeared to be looking through a fog. It seems that prostate drugs weaken the eyes iris and it can puncture and tear during the op. I am presuming from this that the surgeon was one of those that are too clever to read the notes they are given. The British health service is a bit like a sausage machine...in one door and out of the other as fast as possible,next please!!

    I have seen two G.P.s and one opthamologist since one G.P. said it would regrow the other two said it would not.

    When you think a large percentage of middle aged and elderly men are taking this drug, I am surprised surgeons are not more aware of the problem.

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    @Jack, what a horror story. I am so sorry you had such a terrible experience and hope you manage to reach a solution.

    As you say, it does pay to research your surgeon. My husband almost made the same mistake - he was about to book the op with one surgeon, but got talking to our new neighbour and discovered she'd had one eye operated on by the same doctor - and he'd left her with a "lazy eye", (where the outer edge of the eye droops).

    Needless to say she chose a different surgeon for her other eye and was so happy with the result, her husband went to the same surgeon for his cataracts. So my husband immediately cancelled his appointment and switched doctors!

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    Jack 5 years ago

    I had cataract surgery in the spring of 2011. Even my family doctor said it was a "routine surgery"...nothing to worry about. He referred me to the specialist who would do the procedure. I also got the "routine" bit again...as I was signing a release from any lawsuit that might be the result of a surgery gone bad.

    Well...there can be no surgery that is routine...and I found out the hard way. My doctor has some problem with the first eye which partially recovered in the month before the second surgery. It is now five months since that second eye surgery and I have not recovered. As the procedure was coming to a close he "spun the lens" and it got away cutting through a membrane and was about to be lost in the vitreous area in the back of the eye. He recovered it before it could be lost which would have blinded me. But he had to replace that lens and place it in a different spot from the first...and it didn't work. After months of eye drops, mostly steroids, I am now scheduled for a second surgery to replace that lens which may be rubbing on the cornea.

    Prospects for success of this second surgery are iffy. It can be give me clear vision again without pain, it can do nothing to improve my current situation or it can leave me blind. But my options are limited. I cannot continue much longer with the steroids as they increase pressure in the leading to loss of sight from glaucoma.

    Needless to say I have chosen a different surgeon for this procedure and have more confidence in her ability but that does not make the procedure any less risky, or lengthy or the recovery quicker. I will be recovering for at least three months following the surgery.

    So when a doctor says "it is a routine surgery" you might give it more thought...and select your doctor more carefully than I selected mine.

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    You're not wasting the doctor's time, Julie - it's your health and it's important. Blurring could have been something innocent or a sign of something that needs attention, so get it checked out.

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    Julie 5 years ago

    hello I had my second cataract operation in march in my right eye and all was well and my follow up appointment was fine and i was told i no longer need glasses for distance, I was so happy becuase ive worn them for years, Im 52, anyway a few weeks after my optician appointment my eye started going blurry so i went back and I have been referred back to the hospital, the thing is my eye now seems to be ok again so do you think i should cancel my appointment or should i still go anyway just to get checked, I dont want to be wasting doctors time, I thought that maybe i had needed to have the yag laser like i did on my left eye after i had my cataract done on that eye 4 years ago, thanks.

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    Shirley 5 years ago

    Thank you for all the information.

    I will be getting my left eye done on 8/31/11. I actually had a maculor hole in my eye repaired in Feb. 2011 and they told me within a year I would have a cataract. I couldn't even wait for the year, in June I noticed the eye wasn't quite right and when I went back to the surgeon for a follow up on the surgery on the maculor hole he let me know that I did indeed have a catatact.

    So left eye first and then a week later the right eye will be done too. I have a cataract in the right eye (though not as bad as the left) also, so we are going to get that one fixed too. I am going to get the multifocal lenses and am not sure I will now how to act without glasses. I have been wearing them some 50 odd years.

    Thanks again for all the information from everyone.

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    Ooh Bev,what a thing to happen! If you can still see perfectly and there's no pain I'm sure it will turn out alright. Good luck.

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    Bev 5 years ago

    i had my left eye done last month and had no problems. now i had the right one done 3 weeks ago and while making the bed a few days ago, my cat came up the opposite side of the bed and ran right into my eye that I just had done. It feels swollen and I go see the eye surgeon tomorrow and I'm so afraid something is wrong, altho I can see perfetly and have no pain.

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    Hi Maria, I hope all goes well. Working with chemicals shouldn't be a problem for your man, but if he has to carry heavy equipment when cleaning, I would be a bit worried about that. An extra week off would be great if he can get it.

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    Maria Hernandez 5 years ago

    Thanks Marisa for having this page. My boyfriend is having the surgery tomorrow morning and I am searching to find out things that I should know . He is 67 and still working as a janitor at the airport. I hope all goes well. I will post again on how he is doing. It means a lot to be able to read about how other people are doing and feeling before , after, and even during the surgery . They wrote him a letter for a week off from work . He don't wear glasses except for reading and I'm worried about him cleaning and working with chemicals after the surgery. I think he should ask his doctor for an extra week . What do you think ? Oh, that comment you posted a few years ago about you not being Suzy homemaker and how old eagle eyes can do his own dusting made me laugh so hard. I am not a great one either . I'm sure he'll see all kinds of new dirt after the surgery .

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    Lynda, you're in exactly the same situation that my husband was in. It is very disorienting, isn't it?

    Try wearing your old glasses, but take the lens out of the frame on your good side. You should just be able to snap it out, but if not, an optician will remove it for you.

    The other option is to buy an eye patch and wear it over the bad eye. Don't worry about straining the good eye, it can handle it. Just pretend you're Captain Sparrow!

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    lynda kobs 5 years ago

    I had cararact surgery on my left eye a week ago. But my right eye has very poor eyesight and it is very frustrating to see clear and blurry at the same time. I will have the right eye done in a month but until then--any ideas???????

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    Carol, it's not unusual to see some variations in the first few days, but if you're concerned you could give him a call.

    A flickering halo on the outside of your eye sounds more like a visual migraine than an eye problem, but it could be related to your retina so probably worth checking out.

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    carol 5 years ago

    I had cataract surgery on my left eye four days ago.The day following the surgery I could read the newspaper without glasses,which pleased me very much.The following day I experienced some blurriness in distance but could still see things close up.Sometimes I think I can see A cresent halo on the outside of my eye and flickering at times.I am wondering if anyone else has had this experience? My doctor was very pleased with my check=up the day after my surgery and said I have 20/25 vision in it.The blurriness seems to be just for distance should I be concerned? I go back to see my doctor in three days should I contact him before then to tell him of my experiences?

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    Marlene 5 years ago

    Hi, Marisa

    I would like to say wonderful post. I wish I'd seen this a couple of months ago, but its ok. I am a 37 year old woman who had genetic cataracts and just had them removed back in February. The first surgery itself went well, but I had a bad episode right after where the pressure in my eye increased up into the 40's (it supposed to be in the teens, if I remember correctly). That had to be one of the scariest moments in my life. But, they learned from that and the 2nd surgery was perfect.

    I can say to those of you that are considering doing this that it is SO WORTH IT. I was 20/800 without glasses before my surgery, and now I am 20/25 in my right and 20/30 in my left...and I don't have to wear glasses any more. For the first time in my life I am in readers. It is AMAZING. I never knew the world was so bright and beautiful!

    All the things you say on here as precautions are correct, and I would listen to them and take them to heart. And, if your work says that you are on "limited duty" because of the bending / lifting restrictions, go on FMLA for a couple of weeks. It is worth it.

    Good luck to all of you!

    Marlene

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    Good luck, Angel. To be honest, that's one of the things my husband regrets about his surgery. Before his cataracts were removed, he had to wear glasses to get out of bed - but he could see things very close-up, including me.

    He wasn't suitable for multifocal lenses so he has adistance-only lens in both eyes. That means everything within a yard or so is a blur - so he can't see me without glasses!

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    Angel 5 years ago

    I am 38 and went to see a surgeon today my left eye comes in at 20/200 not good and the right is 20/160 first surgery is scheduled for May 24 I am excited as I dont see well cant drive read a book or do my just as a customer service associate with a local walmart. To be able to look at the face of the man I have choosen to spend the rest of my life with is what I look forward to the most

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    Phyl 5 years ago

    Marisa, thank you for the great advice. I had my second cataract surgery two days ago. Vision is still bit blury in that eye but now know how long it takes for total healing. You answered some questions that were on my mind. Oh, sex was NOT one of them, LOL. I am 71 and hubby is 74 but we do have lovely memories. It was interesting reading the comments of others and comparing my experience with theirs. Thanks you again Marisa.

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    @Nor, I'm afraid eye exercises can't possibly work if you have cataracts. No amount of exercises can make the cloudiness go away.

    If you're worried about the surgery, you don't have to rush into it. You'll get to a point where it's so bad, it will start seriously interfering with your life - then you'll have no choice!

    If you have a baby or a toddler to care for, the problem is that you won't be able to pick up or carry your child for two whole weeks after the surgery. A baby counts as a "heavy weight"! There is a comment here by a lady called Iounn who ruined her second surgery by lifting her second grandson too early - so it's something you have to work out before you decide to go ahead. I suspect that's why some doctors are telling you to wait.

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    nor 5 years ago

    i am afraid to have Cataract Surgery ,do you think eye exercise may work? i am mother of 2 under six and i am breastfeeding, do you think i can do it ?some doctors say yes others not,so confused

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    Marisa Wright 5 years ago from Sydney

    That is a tough decision, Mike. My husband is disappointed with the outcome for his left eye - apparently he does have astigmatism but the surgeon didn't explain that before the op.

    Every operation has its risks, so if you can choose a lens which will avoid a second op, I would go for it. However that's only my personal opinion and you need to cross-examine the surgeon on how successful the toric lens would really be. Good luck!

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    Mike M 5 years ago

    I am very nearsighted with significant astigmatism in both eyes. I had cataract surgery in my left eye last week, and in two weeks I will have the surgery in my right. The vision in my left eye with a standard IOL is now about 80% of the vision in my right. My doctor expects this to improve over the next month. But what about a toric IOL for my right eye? I am weighing that against possible astigmatism surgery on my cornea. This surgery would be performed on both eyes approx. 3 mos. after the cataract surgery, when my vision has more or less stabalized. I've heard that the mono toric IOL has about the same out-of-pocket cost as the cornea surgery -- around $1500. My surgeon says that he cannot guarantee 100% effectiveness with the mono toric IOL, and that eyeglasses may be needed later for 100% far vision. (My mono toric contact lens that I had before the cataract surgery corrected my eyesight 100%, ie, 20-20 vision.) I have learned much from your Hub, and your ideas about this decision I'm facing is much desired. Thank you! - Mike M.

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    Sharon 6 years ago

    Ksl

    My doctor didn't tell me what prescription lense he placed in my eyes. I told him I wanted perfect distant vision and wanted to be able to see who I was talking to clearly and that I didn't mind wearing glasses for up close. And that is exactly what I got. I have perfect distant and intermediate vision. I also see pretty well up close. If I forget my glasses I can squint and see up close but to see comfortably I need +1.25. I cannot begin to tell you how pleased I am with my outcome. I opted not to go with the multi focus lense on the advise of my physician. He thought I would be much happier with this. I thought about it for a long time but in the end opted not to do the multi focal and I'm pleased with my outcome.

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    That's a strange one, Joe. It needs further investigation to know what it is, but it sounds like your uncle had another eye problem affecting his vision, but no one noticed because of the cataract.

    A dark area on the back of the eye could indicate macular degeneration which is common in old people. If he's seeing a blank area in the middle of his vision, that's likely what it is.

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    Joe H 6 years ago

    Marissa: my 75 years oncle had a right eye cataract operation. the operation was good, and used the drops as requested. but now after almost one month he's not seeing in his eye except 40%. his dr said that there's a black dot on the back of his eye on the nerve and they will see what's the story. Can you or someone help on this issue

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    Ksl 6 years ago

    Sharon,

    What was the prescription that they set your eyes to? I am guessing something like one eye plano and the other -1.25 is that right? How close can you read? Do you have clear near vision?

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    Oh Jen, I am so sorry to hear of your experience. I hope the laser surgery goes well - and don't let your manager bully you! You only have one pair of eyes.

    Thank you for sharing your story, it is an excellent example of how important it is to take it easy. I suggest you make a written complaint to the surgeon, too - it's dreadful that he's not providing proper advice on after-care. It might just be that he expects the nurse to tell patients, and the nurse thinks the doctor is doing it - whatever, it needs to be put right to protect future patients.

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    Jen Turnbull 6 years ago

    I have just found this hub after looking for info on cataract surgery, it is really good I wish I had found it when I had my first cataract removed.

    I had the first of my cataracts removed on Dec 11th and was given no advice on what I could or couldn't do apart from using 2 lots of eye drops for the first three days. The nurse that was attending to me was on loan from a different dept and failed to tell me to continue with the Pred Forte do I stopped using them after the 3 days.

    I went back to work aftyer a few days recovery. I have quite a physical job but wasn't aware that I shouldn't be lifting or bending. One day my eye was very bloodshot, I didn't know but one of the girls I work with noticed and said that I had a bleed in the eye. Anyway it just went away and that was that.

    A couple of months down the line I was still having problems with the vision in that eye, blurriness and I could see the black outline of the lens or capsule. I was having problems focussing because the light was dazzling me and making the outer edge of me eye seem as if it was flickering. I phoned the clinic and they said it would gradually wear off.

    I had my second eye done on February 11th and it was then that I realised my first eye was getting worse. Because I now had both eyes with a wound I could tell how much worse the first one was getting. I have been off work since having the 2nd eye done because I have fogginess and get so dazzled by light and it makes me feel so dizzy, I feel as though my pupils are moving all over the place. I know that it is the way the light is hitting the lens that is causing this but it makes me feel really strange. I went for my check up last week and when they looked at the first eye they said that the capsule that holds the lens has been tightening up and puckering. So I am having laser treatment on 31st March. Hopefully it will be sorted out then.

    I thought I would tell you about my experience in order to reiterate how important it is to take the precautions after your surgery, I have done with my other eye and it seems to be healing well.

    I am still off work sick and my doctor agrees that I should be off until I have had the laser treatment. Especially as I have already fallen down the stairs at home by putting my foot down where there was no stair.

    Now I have my manager phoning me all the time asking if I can manage to come back earlier, I have told her that I am not taking any risks with my eyesight but I do feel pressured.

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    Sharon 6 years ago

    I'm one week out from my last surgery. Still having some light fluttering in my left eye and even a little still in the right in bright light. My vision is absolutely amazing. I will only say, if you have cataracts ... there is no reason to delay. Do your research, find a qualified physician and do it!!! I'm thrilled with my results.

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    @Sharon, I'm so glad you finally took the plunge. Your experience is like most people - they worry and worry about the operation, then they're so delighted they wish they'd had it done earlier!

    I hadn't heard of the Softec, it sounds great. Multifocals are excellent but there is more risk you won't get a perfect result, so they sound like an excellent alternative.

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    Sharon 6 years ago

    After doing a lot of research and praying I finally had my cataract removed in one eye. I'm having my other eye done in 2 days. I can't tell you how easy this has been and I'm absolutely delighted with the results so far!! My doctor has used an implant called Softec HD. He told me he has been using it for 4 months and have had fantastic results. He did my dominant eye first for distance and I've got perfect distance and intermediate vision too. He said that is what they are finding with this lense. So, I will have my other eyes done for intermediate in the hopes that I will get that and close up as well. I'll let you know. This lense is completely covered by insurance. During my initial consulation with him, I ask him about the multifocal lenses. He said he would be "happy" to do that if that is what I wanted. He could make more money with the multifocal lense but he thought I would be happier with the Softec HD in the long run. Wow, isn't that what you want in a doctor!?! So far, I'm estastic and can't wait to give you a report on the next surgery!!

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    Jason, it doesn't matter because it's an implant,and the degree will stay the same throughout your life. Wear your reading glasses when you need to see to read - if you don't want to wear them, don't!

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    Jason (Singapore) 6 years ago

    I am back after 2 month of cataract ops on my right eye. I had Monovision len implant and hence can see near prefect for long distance but not for near reading.

    Question? Do I really need to put on reading glass else my the degree for my poor near sight reading will worsen? Or because it is a implant it actually doesn't matter because the degree will not increase and will stay the same throughout my life. Any one knows?

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    @Marus, it's not unusual for your eye to be a bit red and light-sensitive after cataract surgery. Keep taking your eye drops according to the schedule and if things don't improve in the next few days, give your surgeon a call.

    If the eye gets MORE red, contact them immediately - you could have an infection.

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    Tammy L 6 years ago from Jacksonville, Texas

    Hi Marisa. My cataract surgery was 17 years ago, when I was 25. It was the effect of Toxoplasmosis. I published a hub about mine today and I am tweaking it now. My eyesight in that eye (right) was 20/100 before surgery. I still had to wear glasses after the surgery because of what it did to my retina. Now, at age 43, I have astigmatism in both eyes and the best my right eye will ever be with glasses is 20/40.

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    The two week itch - LOL. Resist it, Jason - you want that eye to stay as good as it is today!

    Give it some time. If your doctor reckons your left eye is good enough for reading, then perhaps you just needs time to adapt. Eventually your brain will get used to the idea of using just your left eye when you need to read, and filter out the blurriness of the right eye.

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    Jason (Singapore) 6 years ago

    I am 38 and just had my cataract done on my right eye for coming to a week. Doctor recommend Monovision len because my left (non-cataract) will be good enough for reading.

    Kind of agreed with many that I can immediately see well on the very first day.. slight double images for the first 2 days. After which getting better now. But I now can't read my notebook nor newspaper. I used to wear glasses with about 200+deg.. but now right eye feel like an old man..the comforting side is that I can now see really far. Maybe should have opt for Mutifocu len.

    By the way, I used Abbot Tenics ZB00 which kind of giving very clear and slightly blue images.

    Very tempted to go for sports now (like jogging) and hope I can get over the 2 week itch soon..

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    My neighbours are a couple who've both had a cataract op using multivision lenses and they're very happy with them. They went to the Vision Eye Institute (Southline) in Hurstville.

    Of course two people isn't a very big sample so it's not guarantee!

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    faith  6 years ago

    Thanks for that Marisa. Two weeks I can do! My doctor is recommending multivision lenses for me. I of course want to make sure I have the top person doing the job. I like my doctor and feel comfortable with her, but how do I know she is the best person to perform the op? Any suggestions on who the best person in Sydney is who does multivision lenses? Thanks.

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    Don't worry Faith - my husband also had early cataracts so I do understand the feeling of shock, but there's nothing to worry about.

    The limit on carrying heavy objects and jogging is just for the first TWO WEEKS - and you do need to be very strict about it, no exceptions. After that you can go back to normal, assuming your surgeon doesn't tell you otherwise.

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    faith 6 years ago

    I turned 40 last week and was told yesterday by my eye doctor that I have fast growing cataracts in both eyes due to using inhaled steroids for asthma. She said I will need surgery in the New Year. This was all a bit of a shock. I have a two year old son so am worried about not being able to carry him, plus I also jog for fitness. Is the not lifting heavy things only for a brief time or this a long term thing?? Thanks.

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    I wish I could give you a definite answer about multifocals vs monovision.

    The risk with multivision is that the lenses must be implanted with absolute precision. Just a few millimetres out, and you'll have double vision or ghosting. The only solution is to have another operation. So it's vital you go to a top surgeon with lots of experience in multifocals!

    Monovision lens don't have to be so precise so you're less likely to have any trouble regardless of how good the surgeon is. I never thought about the risk of losing an eye - the main downside of monovision is that your depth vision is affected (i.e. you can't judge distances as well as you used to).

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    Sharon 6 years ago

    Thanks Marisa for your quick reply. I've got one more quick question. Again, I'm 52 and have always had perfect vision until needing the cheaters about 5 years ago. Are most people happy with the monovision or the multi vision implants. My insurance will cover the monovision and I've been told the multi vision works in 90% of patients. Is this your hearing too? I'm afraid of having one for distant and one for up close for fear of something happening to one of my eyes. Would love to hear your thoughts. Thanks so much!!

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    I'm so sorry to hear that, Barbara. There is good news and bad news.

    Cataracts and macular degeneration affect two completely different areas of the eye. Cataracts affect the lenses. When you have cataract surgery, the surgeon replaces your own lenses with plastic ones - so the good news is that once you have the surgery, you won't have to worry about the cataracts any more.

    The bad news is that macular degeneration affects the retinas, and they can't be replaced. It's called "degeneration" because your vision will gradually get worse. Research is progressing and there are procedures which can slow down the damage, but right now there isn't a cure.

    Both conditions are age-related so it's very common for patients to have both conditions at once - so your surgeon will be familiar with the available treatments. I do hope it goes well.

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    barbara 6 years ago

    I have told i have cataracts, macular degeneration and a leaking blood vessel behind my eye i have a hospital appointment next week and i am so worried that am going blind i am 63

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    Sharon, once you have the surgery your vision is fixed and won't deteriorate as you get older.

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    Sharon 6 years ago

    I am 52 and have congential cataracts. I've known since I was in my 20s that I've had and our son was diagnosed at 12 as having them as well. Mine are finally getting close to need having them removed. My distant vision is still very good. Although I need reading glasses for up close. My question is once I have the cataract surgery, will my vision continue to worsen as I get older or does the lense they implant hold my vision there for the rest of my life? In other words, should I wait or go ahead with the surgery?

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    Kris Coady  6 years ago

    Hi Marisa,

    The doctor isn't sure. As mentioned above you can be born with cataract or it can be caused/triggered by trauma of some sort. I've never been in a any kind of accident so I'm guessing I must have been born with it. Maybe I can get more information from the doctor when I go for my second opinion.

    The main reason that the first operation took so long, btw. Apparently when they opened up my right eye there wasn't a lens inside the capsule, just a load of rubbish that they had to try and clean out. The doctor had never seen this before and has up to this day only ever met with one other expert who has experienced this kind of cataract.

    I'll keep you updated after I go for my checkups, next week.

    Thanks for reading!

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    Kris, I didn't realize you weren't a native speaker until you told me at the end! What a horror story. You don't say if there was any underlying reason for the cataracts - there usually is when they develop at such a young age, and there must have been something to make the operation so complex (a normal cataract op takes about 20 minutes). Did the doctor ever explain it all to you?

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    Kris Coady 6 years ago

    Small correction: 60meters is approximately 180ft, not 20 :-).

    Sorry about that

    Kris

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    Kris Coady 6 years ago

    Thanks for sharing,

    I was diagnosed with cataracts in both eyes at the age of 18. At that time, though, I wasn't disturbing me at all so the doctor advised me to wait with any kind of surgery, which I did.

    Just before I turned 26 I got my right eye operated on. Initially I ordered an accommodating lens but during the surgery (which lasted 2,5 unpleasant hours, btw) there where all kinds of complications that made it impossible to place a lens of that type in my capsule. So they had to place a multifocal lens, instead.

    For the first couple of weeks after the surgery I had perfect vision with my new lens, even though some of the old cataract was intentionally left to balance the new lens out (or something :-)). After a few weeks, though, my sight began to deteriorate, rapidly. It turned out I also had astigmatism which seemed to be worse than before the surgery. My doctor didn't want to do any laser treatment to deal with this problem because my eye was still weak so I decided to get some glasses for a couple of years. At first the glasses (cilinder: -2,75) did the job. vision tests gave me a 90% score. But as time passed (and up to this day) my vision has started to deteriorate more and more.

    Last July I also decided to get my left eye fixed. This was going to be less of a problem than my right eye, they told me. The surgery on my second eye also took a horrible 2.5 hours to complete. The cataract in this eye was less intense than my right eye but apparently there was a hole in the back of my capsule that was causing troubles. Eventually the doctor managed to place the new multifocal lens perfectly, though. Because of the hole in the capsule the doctor placed an extra stich in eye to keep everything secure. The next day I went back to the clinic for a checkup. Af first everything seemed fine, I had some vision back and the eye was looking healthy. That was, until the doctor removed the stitch that she placed. As she pulled it out I felt liquid running down my eye and cheeks and my vision went black. It turns out the liquid from within the eye was running out of the hole in the capsule.

    At that point I got rushed to a hospital which was an hour away. After waiting there for another hour I got a pupil reconstruction and the eye itself was filled back up with new liquid :-) I should have warned only to read this if you've got a strong stomach, oh well.

    After the second operation it took a few days for my sight to return but when it eventually did it was perfect. After just a week I scored a 90% on the vision tests. which, of course, was cool as my score before the surgery was 40% :-).

    Then the problems started for my left eye, too (while my right eye was also still deteriorating). My vision was (and still is) rapidly deteriorating. All light-emitting objects have hure aura's surrounding them. Driving in the dark has become impossible because approaching cars (or even the lights on bicycles) completely blind my vision. After a checkup at the clinic there's apparently some "debris" in the eye that's causing cataract-like symptoms. I got some drops that where supposed to help and the doctor also said it wouldn't deteriorate any further, "it can only get better from this point on", she said. This, of course, was not true. Now, 6 weeks later, the left eye has deteriorated so badly that seeing in the dark (or in any other room with poor lighting) is almost impossible. The strange thing is that during the day my vision is still close to perfect. While driving I can read number plates on cars that are up to 60meters (approximately 20ft) away. Also reading this, while I'm typing, I have no problems, but If colors where inverted (white letters on black background) I'm certain I would not be able to read a letter, because of all the light would be 'leaking' out of the bright, white letters.

    I'm going for another checkup next week and then for a second opinion, at a different hospital, the week after. I'm afraid, at this rate, I'm going to be blind before i hit thirty.

    Anyway, I just wanted to share my story with you. I'm sorry if this is hard to read. My spoken English is slightly better than my written English (I'm from the Netherlands, btw). :-)

    Kris

    kriscoady@gmail.com

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    Tim, most people do see a dramatic improvement in vision immediately after the surgery, though their eyes may be too light-sensitive to look at things outside. If your vision is poor in the operated eye, you need to call your surgeon now and let him know - there may be a problem.

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    Tim Marshall 6 years ago

    Some specialists say that my Cataracts have been there since birth, but recently iv'e seen other specialists from my local hospital who claim they were brought on due to my Diabetes. Yesterday (28/09/2010), I had them removed from my right eye and have been taking the precautions you have listed above. Going by what I have heard I should see a dramatic change in my vision, but at the moment I can't tell much difference. My thoughts were that I would be able to see one again straight away after the operation. Maybe I am being too optimistic or I am just unclear on the situation.I would like to know, if there is how long is the period of time before I will be able to see again and have my vision back in my right eye.

    Many thanks,

    Tim

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    Aussie 6 years ago

    Hi kpqb

    I am under 40 and have had catarcts removed from both eyes over the past few months. I have lenses inserted for distance vision now. I was very worried about whether I would only be able to focus only on one specific distance after the op, but I guess the lack of precsion of my focus at different distances is really subtle and does not bother me much. I feel like an old man though, needing my glasses for reading. I am shocked at how bad my eyes are for reading the paper or the streeet directory. I can easily see across the table and across the street though and can recognise ppl no worries. Good luck!!

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    kpqb, I can give you some feedback based on my husband's experience. He was very short-sighted too (-12).

    When he had cataract surgery he was told he wasn't suitable for either monovision or multi-focal lenses, so he had to settle for fixed lenses. He loves the fact that he can see distances clearly - but several months later, he's still adapting to full presbyopia.

    The thing is, being fully presbyopic isn't just needing glasses to read. It means needing glasses to see everything closer than about a metre (a yard) away. He has to put on his glasses to eat, to shave and even to see me across the table. He can now recognize friends in the street, but once they stop to chat, he can't see their face unless he puts on his glasses.

    He's actually considering getting a pair of multifocal specs, even though the upper section would have no visual correction, just because the constant need for reading glasses is so annoying.

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    kpqb 6 years ago

    Thanks so much for all this information. I am 39 and very short-sighted (-19 & -20). Went to see a specialist yesterday about having an IOL fitted for purely cosmetic reasons. Things didn't quite go according to plan and it turns out I've got cataracts in both eyes (ah, the sound of the penny dropping, had just assumed a mix of scratched old contacts and early presbyopia were causing me to squint a bit more than usual). We'll be monitoring over the next 6 months but a cataract operation is where I'm heading (the good news is that I hopefully won't need my big thick glasses anymore - every cloud has a silver lining!). My question is this: pre-presbyopic to fully presbyopic in the space of 30 minutes... does anyone have any experience of this or have you read a report anywhere on the internet about this? I have searched but can't find anything... have noticed 2 people here who are 40 or under and so are probably pre-presbyopic. I would love to hear from them. Thanks, Kathryn.

    PS Errrr, presbyopia - needing reading glasses - just in case anyone wasn't sure.

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    David, as I said I'm not a doctor. I've never heard of treating corneal oedema with Uromax but theoretically it could help and should do so fairly quickly. Good luck with the return visit.

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    David N 6 years ago

    Hi Marisa,

    You're right- I was sent to do an OCD an was found with corneal oedema. In the meantime I am taking Uromax

    a pill that is suppposed to lower the oedema and I have been taking it for almost a week. If this doesn't work they may have to do some kind of injection. I go back for another OCD in a couple of weeks. How long would it take for the pill to work?

    Thanks,

    David

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    Mark, the lens isn't attached to anything - it just sits inside the capsule. Considering the lens had to be folded to get it in there, it's highly unlikely it can go anywhere once the incision has healed!

    However, you do have to be very careful until the wound has healed so NO weight training or martial arts for at least two weeks.

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    Mark 6 years ago

    I devoloped a cateract in the right eye two years ago. It originated from steroidal injections I received in the neckto deal with pain and avoid neck surgery. I was 38 then. Now I'm 40 and having cateract surgery in the left eye. My concern is i coach martial arts and wrestling. There are no blows to the head that I take in these sports but an occasional eye rub is not uncommon. My doc said I should be fine that it would take a tremendous blow to dis lodge the implant. How are the implants put in? I looked at a million sites and none explain what the implan is connected to etc. How is it that my doc makes it seem like not a big deal? I want to return to all my activities and not have to worry about anything. I am extremely active. In addition I enjoy weight training and hang gliding.

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    Martin M 6 years ago

    Thanks for the quick reply. I sent an email to my doctor just before I wrote the comment this morning. His reply was similar to yours and said that a number of patients complain of this bleary eyed syndrum which is believed to occur due to the drying of the eye because of the longer period without drops during sleep. His suggestion was to use artificial tears first thing in the morning to lubricate and hasten the visual recovery. Apart from that he reckoned that there is cause to worry and that the vision needs a number of weeks to settle down. I must say that I really felt safe and comfortable while in his care in Singapore. If he is not the leading then he certainly is one of the top Ophthalmologists in Asia and maybe even worldwide and has carried out thousands of cataract op. He poineered the micro surgery in Asia and is constantly flying to the US, Aus and Europe to either attend or give lectures. But of course he is a 3 hours flight away from here but his reply came within the hour.

    But it is great to have a forum like this to exchange our experiences and have the opinion of someone knowledgeable like yourself as a backup.

    Once again thanks.

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    Martin, I'm not a doctor but I've been doing a bit more research on this since I replied to David N.

    The most likely cause is corneal oedema, which is always worse in the morning (because the eye has been closed so the fluid can't escape), and gets better as the day goes on due to surface evaporation. Don't ignore it - it does need treatment (i.e. PredForte drops).

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    Martin M 6 years ago

    Hi, I had cataract surgery in my right eye last April and in my left eye 10 days ago. The op went great and although I was compeltely awake it was painless. The next morning I woke and the vision in my left was much darker than that in my right. The doctor had contricted the pupil in the operated eye in oder to allow the new lens to to imbed quicker. This caused a type of under exposed vision in darker light conditions because the pupil was not opening. After a few days the pupil started to work normally again and my vision became normal. But I have the same problem as David N in the morning. It takes about 4 hours for my vision to normalise after waking but apart from that it feels very comfortable. If this is caused by swelling do you know how long it can last and do the drops have an immediate effect. I was using Pred Forte drops for my right eye so maybe that was why I did not have this problem. I am working in Hanoi and I had the surgery done in Singapore so I am a little restricted concerning facilities here. Due to the fact that my right eye has always been lazy I was advised to use monofocal lenses. I have an Alcon mono in the right and an Alcon mono toric in the left. Could the toric cause this effect. I have 0.25 in the right and 0.5 in the left so I am seeing intermediate clearer than reading or distant vision.

    Great forum thanks for all the information

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    Allie 6 years ago

    I am just getting over my second surgery and God Bless the doctors! I, too, forgot how vivid colors were and see how dirty my house was getting! LOL The doctor told me that cataracts will not return so Im good for another umpteen years! The only thing I noticed with the second surgery is that all the background colors were pink! When the doctor examined me and I asked about it, he told me that it is quite common and would go away. Again, he was right, the pink went away after the second day. Good luck to all those about to have this procedure, you will NOT regret it!!!!

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    David N, in the first two or three months some patients get swelling of the macula, which causes blurred vision. That's why the doctor gave you the pred forte drops, to get rid of the swelling.

    I can't explain why it's worse in the morning, but I'd recommend you keep taking the drops and go back and see your doctor in a few weeks.

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    David N 6 years ago

    I had a cataract operation a month ago. Real piece of cake - no pain or much suffering. The incision healed very well. About 2.5 weeks after the op I woke up in the morning and everything was blurred in the operated eye.

    I went to the doctor and he gave me pred forte drops.

    Later in the day the blurriness went away and I could see 'normal' again. Now every morning I experience this

    blurriness which after a few hours goes away. Is this normal?

    I am 5 weeks after the operation. Thanks

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    David  6 years ago

    The operation is not to be feared, it's a routine procedure and I had both eyes done one week apart and the last one only 3 days ago. My problems started with an accident and a detached retina about 18 months ago and caused a traumatic cataract in one eye. They fixed both eyes because it would hard for the brain to work with no correction in one eye and lots in the other. I've had no issues since the surgery and take the drops religiously. It's tempting to go back to full speed because there's no pain etc. and my vision right now is better than 20/20. A bonus for me is that it costs me nothing as it's covered under the Canadian health car program.

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    Coffacuppee, did you feel you had dry eyes before the eye doctor diagnosed it? Dry eye can make your sight a bit blurry, but it has to be severe to have a big effect. So unless it's something that's been bothering you for a while, I doubt you'll see a big improvement when it's treated.

    Double vision, halos around everything and bad night vision are classic cataract symptoms. There is no "right" time to have surgery for cataracts. In the old days, delaying the surgery made it easier to remove - but with the new technology that's no longer the case. In fact, delaying too long can be bad, because an old, hard cataract can shatter during removal.

    Once you've got cataracts, your only decision is - do I have surgery now or later. There's no other choice - if you don't have surgery, you'll go blind. Most doctors say you should have the surgery as soon as your vision starts affecting your lifestyle.

    The cost varies depending on your surgeon and the kind of lens you choose (if you want perfect vision after the op, you can choose optically corrected lenses which are more expensive). In the US it's about $3,000.

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    coffacuppee 6 years ago

    I have been having trouble good seeing for a couple of years. I have bad nearsightedness in my left eye but could not afford new glasses. Went to SAMS and had an eye exam only to be really disappointed because I could not read beyond the 2nd line. She said it was because of a dry eye condition. I didn't get the perscription filled. There was no mention of cateracts. I did put in the suggested eye drops and warm eye compresses with gentle massages.

    Went to a different eye doctor last week with a more comprehensive test. He mentioned cateracts with a range of 1 to 4, my left eye is a 2+ and right is a 1. I am seeing double vision, my night vision is horrible and there is a halo around everything. I was told I would eventually need surgery but not yet.

    How am I to see better without surgery right away? I am to see him again tomorrow with continued treatment for dry eye to see if the vision is better. He also would not fill a perscription as the prescription was so different from SAMS. He said he may tomorrow.

    What should I be asking him? When does it constitute having surgery? How expensive is the surgery as I have only major medical with a high deductible and recently had a 60% cut in pay.

    Any suggestions

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    Helen, it sometimes takes a while for the vision in the eye to settle down. However, it might be an idea to call your surgeon and see if you can drop in for a check-up, to be on the safe side.

    One question though - what kind of lens did your surgeon implant in that eye? My mother-in-law was concerned after she had her first eye operated on, because everything close was fuzzy.

    It turned out that was perfectly OK, because the surgeon gave her what's called "monovision", i.e. she got a distance lens in one eye and a reading lens in the other. She had the distance lens done first, so naturally it didn't work close up.Once she got her other eye done with the reading lens, her brain adjusted and she could see close up and far away with equal ease!

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    helen 6 years ago

    I had the op 2 days ago but cannot see properly out of the eye - how long before sight is restored?

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    I had a good laugh about the snorkel mask too, Bob! I've certainly got the feedback from readers that surgeons are avoiding the "sex after cataract surgery" question - don't they think anyone has sex after 50? Ridiculous!

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    Bob 6 years ago

    I solved the showering and hair washing problem by wearing a snorkeling mask in the shower. Of course, my wife injured herself falling down laughing, but that's her problem. As for sex, I DID ask my surgeon. To my surprise she seemed embarrased by the question and kinda mumbled something about "nothing too strenuous for a month." No worries, my girlfriend (who is 60 like me) figured out a couple of positions pretty quick that wouldn't cause undue straining on my part.

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    slideseven 6 years ago

    Hi Marisa,

    Excellent advice on your hubs about eye treatment. I've had glaucoma for several years and had two operations for cataracts and experienced everything you put so clearly into words about the after effects.

    I would add one thing though, reaction to the operation does depend on each individual as we are all different, and of course, how healthy one is before and after the eye operation.

    I am based in the North West of the UK and count myself lucky to have a top class eye clinic within the Royal Preston Hospital that not only do excellent work in the theater, but in follow up aftercare too.

    I would add that anyone with glaucoma should insist on family members (and friends) having regular eye checks with an optician. It is worth any cost for the examination to have peace of mind and know if your eyes are healthy, or there are signs of trouble ahead that can be corrected before it becomes too late.

    In my case, I lost 40% of my sight in my left eye simply because I did not know I had glaucoma until it was diagnosed too late by a good optician.

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    Marisa Wright 6 years ago from Sydney

    Thanks for sharing your experience Gary. My husband felt the same about being told he had cataracts at 55! You're quite right, the operation is no big deal, and most people are back to normal in a day or two - but that's why I wrote this, because it's so easy to forget you've just had a major op, and if you overdo things you can ruin the result.

    You'll notice one lady who commented (Iðunn) who started taking out the trash and lifting her grandkids too early, and the eye has never had good vision since.

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    Gary 6 years ago

    To 2besure: Do not be afraid of having been told you have cataracts. I was told a few years ago in one of my bi-annual visits to my optopthamologist. He normally is a great guy but I have to admit he was rather callous when he dropped the cataract bomb on me! To him it was business as usual, to me it was devastating especially since I thought it only happed to "old" people and being in my mid-50's I didn't feel old!

    Anyway, last Thursday I had the left eye's cataract removed (the right eye is very good right now). DO NOT BE AFRAID IT WAS NO BIG DEAL. And trust me I am a worry-wart so if I say no big deal, I really mean it! The operation is easy because you are sedated and have no fear. You do not really know what he is doing although you can "kind of" see up the instrument he is using to do the operation. It is similar to looking up a kaleidoscope, you see beautiful colors. After the operation, you are relieved that it is over and you go home. I took a nap and then watched TV (you have a patch on the one eye). No pain, slight irritation for a day (less than the irritation from allergies). Now it has been a week and every day since the operation has been good. DO NOT WORRY, IT IS SLIGHTLY MORE THAT HAVING DENTAL WORK DONE BUT A LOT LESS PAINFUL.

    I hope I relieved your fear and the fear of others.

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    Aussie 6 years ago

    I am 34 and have just been diagnosed with cataracts in both eyes. I am getting them removed in about 8 wks' time as I can hardly see to read or drive at the moment. Should I be worried about developing cataracts at such a young age? How common is it for ppl in their thirties? What could be the cause if I am otherwise fit and healthy?

    Thanks

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    IĆ°unn 7 years ago

    This is great advice. I ruined my second surgery by overexerting, lifting my grandson mostly and also semi-heavy things - taking out the trash, carrying laundry. That one eye has stayed weak and not best of vision permanently since.

    I wish I could do it over. I hope people listen to you and read this Hub before they mess up like I did.

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    Marisa Wright 7 years ago from Sydney

    Thanks Nancy. I'm the world's worst housewife and for the last three years (while my husband was delaying cataract surgery) he's been mercifully oblivious to the dust. Now ol' eagle eyes is back - I'm telling him that as soon as he's allowed, he can do his own dusting!

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    Nancy Jones 7 years ago

    This is my 5th day following cataract surgery. I do not yet need surgery on the other eye but when I do, I'd definitely have it. I do have some discomfort from scratchiness, but it is not constant. I also am experiencing "negative dysphotopia", which the doctor may not mention but seems to be a fairly common occurrence. It is like a dark crescent at the outer periphery of one's vision in the operated eye, and is said to disappear usually within 3 months. It has to do with how light may hit the new lens. That, too, is not constant. I was amazed that this surgery could be done without general anesthetic, as I fear most medical procedures and suffer from anxiety as well. The surgery caused NO PAIN and only minor discomfort from pressure, and it was over in about 10 minutes. The stinging eyedrops were far more uncomfortable than any part of the surgery.

    On the plus side, the COLORS!!!

    I had forgotten what "sky blue" really is, and tomato soup is vermilion. My home is incredibly dusty, something I could not see before. The idea of being poked in the eye while awake is not appealing, but the surgery is NOT scary and I'm glad I had it.

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    SamAntone 7 years ago

    I've had cataract surgery, and I know of the importance of not rubbing the eyes. I even had an eye patch for while, especially at night, because you can rub your eyes while unconscious. After all the precautions, though, I was amazed at what I could see! Maybe I'll publish a hub describing the differences, before and after.

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