Aches & PainsAlternative MedicineChildren's HealthDisabilitiesDisease, Illness & ConditionsEye CareFirst AidHealth Care IndustryInjuriesMental HealthOlder AdultsOral HealthReproductive HealthWellness

Are You Addicted to Nicotine Gum Or Lozenges ?

Updated on July 28, 2016
Source

Nicotine gum and nicotine lozenges can be useful tools when you are trying to beat a smoking addiction. However, for a growing number of ex-smokers, there is a risk of trading one addiction for another. The number of smokers who start using these products to quit cigarettes and then find themselves trapped in a new addiction is unknown, but it may be substantial.

Many packages say you should not use nicotine gum or lozenges for more than three months. The trouble is, once you are hooked, you are hooked. I know people who have been using them for years and are as dependent on them as they were on cigarettes. I find it interesting that no formal studies have been done on the effects of long term use of these products, yet nicotine gum and lozenges are readily available over the counter in your local drugstore or supermarket. I also personally know people who have used them for years—many years—and have experienced stomach problems, high blood pressure, borderline glaucoma, and hair loss among other things—all of which disappeared when the nicotine gum was stopped.

In addition, there is growing evidence of a relationship between long term use of nicotine gum and mouth and throat cancer. I think some real medical studies are definitely in order.

Quitting cigarettes is hard—very hard. I should know. I kicked the habit after more than 30 years and I did it with the help of a nicotine patch, and later nicotine gum. I wrote a hub about quitting cigarettes and I have now been smoke free for more than a decade, but not gum and lozenge free. It took me years to free myself from that addiction and my experience is far from unique.

Thanks whyquit.com
Thanks whyquit.com

My Nicotine Replacement Story

I had my last cigarette over a decade ago. I had managed to stop once for four years, but had a life crisis and bummed one cigarette—I couldn't believe that after four years, one cigarette could hurt, but it did. Within months I was back up to two packs a day and a lot had changed.

For starters, the price of cigarettes had gone up dramatically and people were much less tolerant of smokers than they had been when I smoked before. The upshot was that after a year or so I started trying to quit again. I finally made it, going cold turkey with the help of the nicotine patch. I threw out all my cigarettes one night, slapped the patch on when I woke up the next morning, and that was it. After four weeks on the patch, weaning myself down from 21 mg to 14 mg of nicotine, I decided to switch to Nicorette gum, figuring that I would taper off until I was using no nicotine replacement at all.

It didn't happen. Like any good addict, I stopped counting how many pieces of gum I chewed. I kept buying my supply and ignoring the fact that it was taking more and more of the substance to satisfy me. I consumed 10 or more of the 2 mg lozenges or pieces of nicotine gum a day. I grew to like the taste and looked forward to my lozenges the way I had once enjoyed cigarettes. I told myself that it was OK to keep using my lozenges because at least I wasn't smoking.

Now, I hasten to say that there are 4000 substances in tobacco smoke that are not in the gum or the lozenges and most of them are poison and proven to be carcinogenic, but nicotine is the addictive substance in cigarettes and when you put it in a lozenge or piece of gum it is still an addictive substance. If you were a highly addicted cigarette smoker, you will be at high risk of becoming addicted to nicotine gum or nicotine lozenges.

That said, I must also admit that only with the help of nicotine replacement therapy was I able to get off cigarettes, so here is what I recommend for you if you are either a long term user of nicotine gum or lozenges (more than three months) or a highly addicted smoker considering using nicotine replacement as a quitting aid.

How to Get Off the Gum

Whether you are using nicotine gum or lozenges to quit cigarettes, or are an ex-smoker who has become hooked on nicotine replacement, the same rules apply.

  • Do not, under any circumstances, smoke a cigarette while using nicotine gum or lozenges. An overdose can be very dangerous and will totally sabotage all your good work.
  • Buy a little notebook and carry it at all times. Use as many pieces of gum as you wish to calm cravings, but note how many you use and the time so that you know how many a day you are using. Be honest with yourself and don't cheat or forget—that is important. Most people use 15 to 20 lozenges or pieces of gum a day when they first give up smoking. You want to get a baseline and work down from there.
  • After two weeks take away just one lozenge a day and see how you do. The idea is to use the nicotine replacement just enough to keep the withdrawal symptoms at bay, but not so much that the gum replaces cigarettes, so you should be feeling mild but manageable cravings. When these stop, withdraw one more lozenge or piece of gum from your daily allotment. Do this for as long as it takes but no longer than three months. Once you are down to five or so nicotine hits a day, you might want to put the lozenges or gum someplace inconvenient in your home—like in the attic or a closet or under a pile of books so that you really have to make an effort to get one—and of course keep track in your notebook.
  • If you are still using gum or lozenges three months after giving up cigarettes, you have probably substituted one addiction for another and are just not getting your nicotine hit from cigarettes (which is good) but are still hooked on nicotine which you are getting from gum or lozenges (not so good). Start with step one above and get yourself unhooked. If you can't do it alone, talk to your doctor or enlist a friend to supervise your tapering off period. Do not, under any circumstances smoke a cigarette. It is amazing how stubborn an addiction can be and it is equally amazing how having to be accountable to your doctor or a trusted friend will help you unload those last few nicotine quitting aids and become totally nicotine free.

Kicking cigarettes is no small thing and, as many will tell you, getting hooked on nicotine replacement therapy is not nearly as bad as being hooked on cigarettes. (Plus you don't have to step outside in the rain and cold to chew a piece of gum after dinner.) But, and this is a big BUT: nicotine, even in the form of gum or lozenges is a poison, bad for your body, and highly addictive. Long term use can bring on serious health problems, and there are those who say there may be a link to gastric and mouth cancers, as well as dental problems. The bottom line is: nicotine gum and lozenges can be important aids to quitting cigarettes, but it is equally important to not let the aid become a new addiction.

Nicotine Addiction is Real

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • stephhicks68 profile image

      Stephanie Hicks 6 years ago from Bend, Oregon

      Wow, I had no idea that nicotine gum and lozenges could pose such a problem! Great tips and very useful, especially with your personal story. Thumbs up!

    • JamaGenee profile image

      Joanna McKenna 6 years ago from Central Oklahoma

      First off, I don't condone or promote smoking and urge that those who've never smoked to never start. I'm also aware that some people are genetically prone to becoming addicted to *something*, whether it be nicotine in any form, alcohol, drugs, gambling, shopping, sex, video games, or the internet - even food - to name only a few.

      As for the 4,000 toxic substances in tobacco smoke, a smoke-free life is not devoid of toxins. They're in our food, our water (and the bottles we drink it from), our clothing, our furniture, our cleaning products, and in prescription drugs as well as OTC products. Even with the windows up, we breathe the toxins in vehicle exhaust fumes. We apply toxic substances to our bodies in the form of make-up, hair color, bath products, fingernail polish and remover. The list is endless.

      That said, I wonder at the logic of those who rally around a relative with breast cancer or a debilitating disease such as MS, but avoid or sever all ties with a friend or relative addicted to nicotine.

      Great tips, robie, for breaking an addiction to nicotine. Now about that addiction to the internet... ;D

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 6 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Thanks Steph and Jama-- not trying to step on any toes here, Jama. We all get to pick our toxins. It is just that for those who really want to quit but can't, nicotine gum and lozenges can be very useful, however they are a double edged sword and that is not publicized nearly enough. We get to pick our addictions too so light up, my friend. I do not in any way consider smokers second class people. It is a choice like everything else er now I must get back to the internet :-)

    • JamaGenee profile image

      Joanna McKenna 6 years ago from Central Oklahoma

      robie, I didn't mean that *you* consider smokers "second class people". But there are some who do. And some who shun smokers but think nothing of getting falling-down drunk in a smoke-free bar several nights a week. Hello?

      But back to the point of your very informative hub. The dangers of nicotine gum and lozenges **should** be more widely publicized. However, since nic lozenges and gum cost roughly the same as cigarettes, it's a sure bet the companies who make them don't want the public to know how dangerous they really are.

      A deserted island in the Pacific seems to be the only toxin-free alternative...as long as I can access the internet. ;D

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 6 years ago from Central New Jersey

      hmmmm is there wi-fi on those deserted Pacific islands? You make a good point-- there is not much logic when it comes to addiction, is there--gotta go check my email now:-)

    • Joni Douglas profile image

      Joni Douglas 6 years ago

      I have seen this transfer of addictions. I know a friend who has been on the gum now for years. He feels superior to smokers even though his nicotine gum addiction far exceeds his wife's smoking addiction.

      Yes, your point of studies needing to be done to test the ramifications of long term use is spot on. This gum was cleared very quickly for use under the guidance of a doctor not for widespread use as an over the counter remedy.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 6 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Thanks for your comment Joni--you make a good point about ex-smokers being lulled into a false sense of security by the gum-- and while it is true that the gum when used properly can really help and using it is better than smoking-- it truly is not without danger. Personally, I ended up with massive dental issues, stomach ulcers, and a borderline glaucoma which totally disappeared the moment I got off nicotine replacement

    • H P Roychoudhury profile image

      H P Roychoudhury 6 years ago from Guwahati, India

      A mentally sound and determined person can do what he or she likes to do. Stat smoking or drinking, now stop everything- everything is possible for the person It is because ‘the will’ is under him and but if ‘the will’ is not under him, the person can not control anything.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 6 years ago from Central New Jersey

      I think that translates into, you have to really want to in order to quit and unless you really want to you can't do it. and if that is what you are saying I'd say that in most cases you are absoutely right.

    • De Greek profile image

      De Greek 6 years ago from UK

      What an important warning bell you have rung. Well done :-)

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 6 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Thanks de Greek-- good to see you

    • Jewels profile image

      Jewels 6 years ago from Australia

      I gave up smoking cold turkey in 2002 and have never looked back. I've friends who tried the gum and patches and are still smoking - because you can't replace the addiction of nicotine with nicotine. Even the strong willed have difficulty with this one. And as you say robie2 - you really have to want to quit. If you want to quit you will, you will find a way.

      A change of standpoint helps - like I was told that I no longer fitted the stereotype of a smoker. That helped - meant to infer I was bigger than the cigarettes. I also looked at being a slave to these cancer sticks. They ruled me, I seemed to have no choice - and that was crap, I did have choice but I was choosing victimhood by smoking.

      I stopped the guilt trips that come with being a smoker and not being able to quit - it doesn't work, and I made me more important than Phillip Morris and the pharma companies that want to prolong your addiction with the gum.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 6 years ago from Central New Jersey

      What a great point you make, Jewels, about choices-- seems to me that addiction removes our ability to choose and really does enslave us-- I ended up knowing I was smoking because I had to and not because I wanted to and feeling totally helpless. I so agree that taking back your power and choosing not to be a victim is the mindset that works-- my problem was getting there :-) Thanks for sharing your personal experience and congrats on becoming an ex smoker:-)

    • Jewels profile image

      Jewels 6 years ago from Australia

      Thanks Robie. Like to add that saying I am a non smoker is like music to the lips, ears and lungs. It feels great to say "I don't smoke." I never ever thought of that when I was a smoker.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 6 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Amen:-)

    • SteveoMc profile image

      SteveoMc 6 years ago from Pacific NorthWest

      You just described me. I quit smoking 1 year ago but I still chew the gum. Although I have made great progress and I am chewing only 1 or pieces a day. I break them into two pieces and have one in the morning and one after work. That cost about 8 dollars a month. I have not decided to give up the gum. I think when I do, I will be able to.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 6 years ago from Central New Jersey

      You seem to be using the gum the way it was intended to be used-- I am sure you will be able to stop when you want. I was chewing at least ten pieces a day for years and got totally out of control with the gum. Congrats on quitting and thanks for adding your two cents.

    • 2besure profile image

      Pamela Lipscomb 6 years ago from Charlotte, North Carolina

      It is sad to say that the cure can be as bad as the addiction. I just quick cold turkey!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 6 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Congrats 2besure-- that is fabulous

    • profile image

      shannon 6 years ago

      I think cold turkey is the easiest way to quit.. on whyquit.com they have this free e-book called Never Take Another Puff.. After reading it, it was really easy to quit... and when you do it cold turkey you get done with the withdrawals in a week or so, instead of dealing with them for months while using NRT.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 6 years ago from Central New Jersey

      I totally agree with you Shannon-- for people who can quit cold turkey that is-- and if you go cold turkey you don't run the risk of getting hooked on the nicotine replacement. My problem was I never could get more than two days off cigarettes before relapsing and I reallythought I was never going to be able to quit so the gum, patches and lozenges are very helpful for people like me-- problem is we get hooked on them too and have to detox twice, as you say-- doesn't matter how you do it-- the bottom line is quitting and staying quit

    • profile image

      Karen 6 years ago

      I smoked for 33yrs. and stopped with the help of nicotine lozengers. The only problem is that I stopped 4 1/2 years ago and I still use the lozengers. I can't stop my addition. Does anyone have a suggestion? When I tell my doctor, all he say's is he would rather have me use those instead of smoking.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 6 years ago from Central New Jersey

      I had the same problem Karen, and ended up with some pretty serious gastro-intenstinal issues. I sucked on those damned things for 8 years and finally kicked by counting each lozenge I used and writing it down in a little notebook I kept with me at all times. It took about six weeks for me to get down to zero.

    • princess g profile image

      princess g 6 years ago

      easier to get off than actual cigarettes though.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 6 years ago from Central New Jersey

      hmmm not sure about that, princess g-- but it is true that the lozenges have nicotine, which is the addictive substance but don't have the one hundred or more other poisonous and carcinogenic substances found in cigarette smoke-- so sucking on a lozenge is not as bad for you or as harmful to bystanders as smoke-- plus you don't have to go outside and huddle nest to a public ashtray to do it:-)

      That said-- maybe the lozenges are easier to give up than cigs for some people. For me it was kind of a toss up.

    • DavitosanX profile image

      DavitosanX 5 years ago

      Cold turkey is the way to go! I'm linking to your hub from mine :D

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      I agree-- Cold Turkey is best if you can do it--many people can't. I tried cold turkey dozens of times over the years and never made it-- but if you can do it, absolutley, cold turkey is the way to go. Thanks for the link. I'm off to become your newest follower:-)

    • profile image

      EmmaJ 5 years ago

      Hi, I've just come across this site and must admit it read with alarming truth! I gave up smoking 7 years ago, having smoked 40 a day for years but am addicted to the lozenges now, I just suck on them permanently. Trouble is, there is a stock problem at the moment and it's only now I've realised the extent of my addiction. I'm in a panic as I can't buy any. I've driven to a couple of towns and bought up what they had, I've even tried ordering on line. Now that's tragic I know - people don't seem to appreciate that you can substitute one addiction for another, I get comments fairly regularly saying "why are you still sucking those things?", until now I've replied, because I want to, when in actual fact, it's because I need to. I have decided to kick the habit though as am concerned at the levels of aspartame I must be consuming too. It has really shocked me as, like a few of the other comments, I feel great that I'm not a smoker anymore but feel a little less pious as I know I am still addicted. It was reassuring to read that I'm not alone...I think I will have to try cold turkey, am not that good at rationing myself! Thanks for the very interesting article. Lastly, I too agree that a study should be carried out to ascertain the long term effects.

    • profile image

      Sasa 5 years ago

      I to am addicted to the lozengers. For 13 years!!! I will be trying the writing down thing as I know they can't be helping my health. One thing I do know is I'm not hurting anyone else. That means something. Just wish me luck. I know I need it.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Emma and Sasa-- thanks for adding your voices here and good luck getting off the lozenges. You can do it-- you both got off cigarettes, cold turkey or gradually, either way you will get off them-- how you do it isn't important, but it is important to get off them

    • profile image

      merrylegs 5 years ago

      Good article. Emma and Sasa I think we need - and is probably only a matter of time before they pop up - a support group for people getting off NRT! I stopped smoking almost 5 years ago using the lozenges. Was a heavy smoker - at least 30 a day. Never smoked again and though I found it tough, the lozenges were brilliant. Used them as meant i.e. I reduced the numbers and the strength but could never make the final jump to none. Somewhere along the way my use increased. Still use the 1mg ones but use them constantly. I HATE that I am doing this and am prepping to quit. I chew ordinary gum as well. Often both together. For goodness sake - I am getting really tired of ME. Time to quit for good and all.

      Anybody reading, try - try REALLY hard - to quit smoking cold-turkey!

      Meg

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Thanks for that terrific comment, Meg. I know how you feel. It is soooooo frustrating to have given up cigarettes and find yourself tied to the lozenges. I did it for eight years and ended up with stomach ulcers from the whole experience. I'm thinking the idea of a group for people getting off NRT is a great one -- oh yes, and it doesn't help that my doctor totally under-rated the seriouslness of my lozenge addiction but just kept saying it was a lot better than smoking cigarettes-- well yah-- but still !!!!!!

      Thanks for stopping by and commenting and Welcome to Hubpages. I'm following you now and looking forward to reading your hubs

    • profile image

      Basil 5 years ago

      I've been on the lozenges for about 3 yrs after smoking for almost 20 years. I have to stop because I can afford them. I read this article about health and dental problems. My left eye has got worse and worse over the last few years that resultied me getting glasses. I've had 4 teeth pulled. I can't seem to eat dinner without running to the bathroom less than 5 minutes after eating in the evening. I know I use close to 20 lozenges a day. Help me Robie.

    • profile image

      Daphne Broon 5 years ago

      i am addicted to the lozenges! I dont even want to smoke any more, but i look forward to my lozenges and panic and get irritable if i can't get hold of any. I feel more like an addict than before as I have to go to the chemist to get the damn things. also, living in italy, the availability is poor and any visitor coming to see me is asked to bring out a stash, like a drugs mule!! Woe betide them if they forget. My brother in law once brought out a few packs of gum instead of the lozenges. I was devastated as I hate the gum (But will use it on an emergency). I am really sick of this addiction and know it is harming my health. But it is a psychological crutch just as the fags were and i reckon i need some addiction to keep me going. If only I could get addicted to running or something healthy, but it ain't gonna happen. I will try to cut down but at the moment I need them (been quit almost a year). Nicotine is damned addictive, amazingly so, if you have an addictive nature. I for one will never try crack cocaine, as i reckon i would be hooked after a couple of draws.Still, the lozenges are better than smoking as in general i feel pretty good. Good luck to thise in the same boat. this nonsense cannnot go on. we need to get a grip. Maybe I will try sucking buttons or pennies.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Basil and Daphne. Thanks for sharing your personal experiences here. I identify with both of you. I was in the same boat for years. Tapering off finally worked for me, but it wasn't easy. In some ways getting off the lozenges was harder than kicking cigarettes but please do try because it is well worth it once you are free

    • profile image

      Dan 5 years ago

      Hi,

      Thank you for writing an article about this. It is defintely

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      It definitely is:-) thanks for commenting, Dan

    • profile image

      addict 5 years ago

      I have been using one half of a 2mg losenge a day (broken in 4 pc.) that's 1 mg of ncotine a day for 4 weeks and still get crazy urges. In fact, I do believe that my personal experience of the lozenges is that they are more addictive than smoking was. Maybe because it's a pure pharma-grade nicotine? not sure, but this sucks. I'm using tic-tacs now to see if this works. All the best and thankyou for prompting the world of medicine to see if they can look into this. Bottom line is that it's not profitable to research what's wrong with meds, only to prove that they have valu. You and I are the research.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Right you are, addict-- we are the guinea pigs :-) and I think you may be right about the lozenges being more addictive than cigarettes-- at least for some people. I still suck on breath saver mints, but I don't get the craving for the nicotine anymore. It really does pass, but it does take time. Good luck and don't let the cravings get you down.... keep at it and you will win

    • profile image

      Ivy123 5 years ago

      Wow am truly shocked with these comments decided to do a bit of research into side effects on the usage of the lozenge have been using these for nearly 3 years, and know that I have escalated my use of them like Daphne I lke sucking on the lozenge, look forward to my first every morning then don't really stop, up to 20 per day. For the past three months thought have been experiencing some real discomfort in the stomach and bowel, and wondered wether it could be related to the lozenge after reading this page have realised that my discomfort is probably related to the lozenge...time to seriously think about stopping for good!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Just to let you know, Ivy-- I sucked on the lozenges for 6 years and ended up with stomach ulcers as well as serious heartburn and a totally irritated intestine. I became anemic as the result of the ulcers. I'm fine now-- but was on medication for a year -- take this seriously. It is a real addiction and can really hurt you.

    • profile image

      Lotus11 5 years ago

      Wow, I can relate. I have been cigarette free for 10 months now but now I am addicted to the lozenges. I have been timing myself and only allow myself to have one every 4 or 5 hours. I have ulcers now though and stomach problems. Thinking this can definitely be linked to the lozenges. I am either going to try to completely stop them or try cutting more out and doing the notepad idea like you suggested robie2. Thanks for all the info and comments. It really is trading one addiction for another and it really is harmful.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Hi Lotus11 Do get off the lozenges as soon as you can -- I am convinced they caused my ulcers and anemia and gave me heartburn. Thanks for sharing your experience here and best of luck

    • profile image

      Jason 5 years ago

      Wow, after being addicted to Lozenges for almost two years now, and in recent months been hit with bad stomach problems, diarhea, and heartburn, I googled "addicted to nicotine lozenge" and came across this page. Just wow. I really thought this addiction was harmless, at least in comparison to smoking. I probably go through at least 10 4mg lozenges a day.. It's gotten to the point that it isn't just the nicotine that's addicting, it's the almost soothing feeling of having the lozenge resting in the corner of your mouth. Now I have to figure out how to quit these things..

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      I totally identify with you Jason-- I came to prefer the lozenges and didn't want to go back to smoking. I think that for some of us lozenges can be the methadone of nicotine. Sadly, there is no way to quit but to quit. It really is an addiction and while less bad than smoking, can certainly do a bad bad number on your stomach and intestines.

    • profile image

      Ros 5 years ago

      Just came across this site after a ghastly experience trying to stop smoking with the aid of NRT. I tried to stop because I was feeling so ill (been off sick from work, bored, smoking more than usual, I'm normally a light smoker); 10 days later after using the NRT *prescribed by the nurse at the quit clinic* (!!) I wasn't smoking, but I was feeling far, far worse than I had ever felt whilst smoking - nauseous, shaking, pounding headache, stomach upsets. Then I read the side of the NRT packet and compared the amount of nicotine each of these things contains compared to a cigarette - between twice and six times as much, depending on strength of cigarette.

      I will never ever use them again, if I try to quit again, hopefully soon, it will definitely be cold turkey! Can't believe that you can now buy these highly potent, extremely addictive items in any supermarket in my country, much more freely than cigarettes can now be bought. They can even be bought by children over 12 years, incredible but true.

      Since I only smoke in my own home and car (and I live on my own and drive on my own), and I'm quite capable of going without cigarettes for several days if I need to visit non smokers, my only reason for quitting is consideration of my own health; so there's no way I'll ever try NRT again. I could feel my blood pressure rising with each dose as I never have done with cigs!

      Whoever said that the pharma companies are using us poor suckers as guinea pigs has it dead on. No new medicine would be allowed on the market in the way these things have been allowed, there is NO data on effects of long term usage and I suspect another health time bomb is being created here under the guise of 'health promotion', when the primary motivation of the manufacturers is in reality not public health but their own profit margins.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Thank you so much,Ros for you long and really informative comment. I have been amazed at the comments this article has generated. I now know that I am far from alone in my bad reactions to nicotine lozenges and am beginning to think they are as dangerous as cigarettes-- in the same way that Heroin, which was developed as a kind of synthetic morphine, became more dangerous than the drug it was designed to replace. Thanks for reading and commenting

    • profile image

      Selma Vidisdottir 5 years ago

      Thanks to all of you for your stories. I have been using the gum for 7 years and finding it impossible to quit. Reading all your comments have given me the push that I needed. Hope we all do well stopping this addiction.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      And thank you, Selma, for adding your voice to the chorus here. Good luck to you in getting off the gum. It is hard, but well worth the effort.

    • profile image

      Lesley 5 years ago

      Been on lozengers for 4 years and am truly addicted. Have been to doctors and they advise replacing them with fishermans friend tablets!!! So will probably now be on them for years. Have to say had no tummy problems but eye sight definitely worse. I will try cold turkey and see what happens instead of getting addicted to something else. So glad I found this - really helped.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Thanks for sharing your experience Lesley and good luck with the cold turkey.

    • profile image

      Barbarasue1 5 years ago

      I smoked for over 20 years, quit smoking about 11 years ago and started chewing the nicotine gum. I ended up chewing the gum for about 7 years. It destroyed my dental work and tore out my bridge work. I finally somehow managed to quit the gum and was nicotine free for about 3 years. I made the mistake one day of taking a hit off a cigar (of all things) and eventually became addicted to cigars. I was only french inhaling them, thinking i couldn't get addicted that way....wrong!! Next thing I knew, I was sneaking outside at work and hiding behind a building, smoking a cigar! I had to hide because I'm a woman and thought people would stare at me.

      Anyway,after about 6 months, I finally decided i was ready to quit the cigars and I started using Nicotine lozenges. Now, almost a year later, I'm still scarfing down the lozenges. I don't follow the directions and I use a lot of them. I've also recently developed some strange symptoms. The doctor says it's called Angio edema and he says I'm allergic to Nickel. I get huge, red, itchy welts all over my body and my lips, ears, hands and feet have all swollen up like a balloon. Even though he says it's Angio edema, I have a sneaking suspicion that it's related somehow to the lozenges.

      I plan on quitting the lozenges very soon and I dread it!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      oooh Barbarasue, that rash sounds awful. I think there is a lot they don't know about these lozenges and a lot they do know that they aren't telling us. I hope you can get off the lozenges soon to know if your intuition is right. I had terrible intenstinal trouble, anemia and borderline glaucoma all of which totally disappeared when I quit the lozenges-- go figure. I'm keeping my fingers crossed for you and I hope you set a quit day soon. Thanks for sharing your story here.

    • debbieryan profile image

      debbieryan 5 years ago

      I smoked 2 packs a day for 35 years, quit 3 years ago and could never had done it without nicotine lozenges. Yep, you guessed it. Totally addicted to the lozenges now. At keast 10 a day, always have a back up container. Still miss smoking though. (How sad is that?) Will try your count and taper method. Good to know I am not alone. Thanks for your post!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      You are far from alone Debbie-- do the taper and get rid of the damned things. I don't miss smoking but I still suck on sugarless breath mints so I guess I must miss the lozenges-- how lame is that?

    • profile image

      sms71 5 years ago

      I have just 'quit' not smoked for a week. Missing it like mad, can't concentrate, feel moody anxious and bored. I am on the gum, lozenges, patches, UGH! Getting fed up with them already. Thinking of going Cold Turkey. Can someone please tell me how to expect to feel if I choose the CT option, plus is it correct that I will get rid of the cravings after a week. WISH I HAD NEVER EVER STARTED SMOKING !!!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      If you can do cold turkey, it is the way to go-- but the withdrawal and cravings are very powerful while they last which is why NRT is used by so many. If you choose cold turkey the worst should be over in a few days-- but even after withdrawal the cravings continue, however they get weaker over time if you don't give in to them. Two things to remember, whether you use NRT or go cold turkey is 1) Do not under any circumstances give in and smoke " just one" and 2) most cravings, no matter how intense, only last for ten minutes or so-- just tell yourself to wait half an hour and you will find the craving gone in most cases. Good luck sms71-- you can do it-- you've gone this far. Keep going.

    • profile image

      J-Le 5 years ago

      Help ! Ive been on 2mg lozengers for over 4yrs. I consume them like sweets and as a result end up with mouth ulcers. I have also noticed my eyesight getting really bad and have problems with my intestines like bloating. Allergies have increased and I now have asthma. I'm convinced this lozengers have created most of these problems but the truth is I'm well and truly addicted. I'm considering trying patches to help break the habit of lozenger popping (yes I know....swapping one addiction for another!)not sure what mg to start on though?. Cold turkey hasn't worked I just go crazy!! Ive found the supermarket own brands are the cheapest to buy and get really stressed if the shelf is empty (which they usually are), resulting in my purchase of a more expensive brand....dread to think how much I spend :( My teeth are okay so far but I'm worried about damage to them too. My GP tells me that I don't need to worry, as niquitine is addictive but the lozengers haven't got the chemicals in them like cigarettes. I agree, test should be done because there's obviously a problem here and I really don't want to be a guinea pig!.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Thanks for your comment J-Le. For what it is worth, The patches might work as a tapering off measure-- just make sure you don;t do both patches and lozenges at the same time. You could start with the 4mg patch and taper down to the 2 mg patch after a couple of weeks-- Good luck. I don't care what the doctors say-- the lozenges have their own problems-- just look at this comment thread. I am amazed myself:-) Anyway. Please do try to get off them one way or another. Patches, tapering, whatever works for you. Good luck.

    • profile image

      dove777 5 years ago

      I have been sucking lozenges for almost two years and am definelty addicted. I feel guilty sneaking them, spending so much money I do not have. I am noticing my eyesight is getting worse--I can't read words on signs or tv like I used to. I thought I needed my lazik tweaked! I have incredible gas all the time. My teeth are suffering--cavities. I am 56 years old and very worried about this problem. I am going to monitor my use and try your cutting back method. Thank you in advance.

    • profile image

      J-Le 5 years ago

      Hi again, having read 'Lesley's' comment about trying fishermans friend lozenge, I decided to give them a try. I have cut down on my consumption of the niquitine lozenge by almost half although you either love em or hate em!. They do come in several flavours but are hard to get hold of, however Ebay has all the sugar free varieties ....will be ordering them :D. They are a similar consistency to the niquitine ones and a cheaper alternative to my plan 'A' to try patches as well. Hope this helps someone else?.

    • profile image

      dove777 5 years ago

      I am open to anything! I am noticing other symptoms (with my daughters help) super cold feet, ringing in my ears, lots of bone pain. I quit smoking in 1996 for 11 years and did not use anything else---don't remember any weirdness like this time but hey I am alot older now to! I have attributed all these symptoms with age--now I think its the nicotine.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Good luck Dove-- I think that once you get off the lozenges you'll feel better in every way-- that was my experience-- and think of the money you'll save:-) Thesse things may help us kick cigarettes, but they have their own problems with prolonged usage. That's for sure. I've got my fingers crossed for you.

      J-Le-- thanks for coming back to share your experience with Fishermans Friend lozenges. Kudos and I am so glad to hear you are feeling better already

    • profile image

      me 5 years ago

      So good that I found this and other websites talking about this! I've been using lozenges for the last 6 months and started really enjoying them. The effect: I just got my first mouth sore, besides bloating and feeling fatigued for quite a while already. Going to quit this stuff immediately! Will write how it goes.

    • profile image

      Lesley 5 years ago

      Well have to report that am now free of the lozengers after replacing them with fishermans friend tablets!! Who would have thought it would work !! they come in a variety of flavours but I like the aniseed and mint ones. Not getting through many at all and the craving for the lozengers has just about gone. Will keep you informed.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Kudos to both of you and please do come back and share what happens. I'm glad you wrote about Fishermans Friend lozenges here too-- maybe the information will help somebody else.

    • profile image

      Mandi 5 years ago

      I don't normally comment on forums but I feel I must in this case. If for no other reason than for anyone out there wanting to quit smoking please read on.

      My story really begins on mothers day 2002. But 1st some back ground.

      I started smoking in Ernest when I was 14 yrs old. I liked it. I felt grown up but I enjoyed it. Even now I can honestly say I could smoke and STILL enjoy it. As the yrs passed my habit grew until I was smoking at least 60 a day. I didn't even want to pack in smoking. I could afford my habit and as I said I enjoyed smoking. I was approached by some guy who was running a stop smoking group in my area and I was asked to join. Everyone else wanted me to quit and so for them I said I'd go along!

      My 1st session was interesting and I learnt of all the bad stuff in fags which I hadn't known about and when they asked if I'd like to give quitting a go I said yes. I wasn't convinced it would work for me though but I went along with it. I was given a letter to take to my drs. Two days later I had a prescription in my hand for Zyban. Within 3/5 days of taking Zyban I was an ex smoker! I continued to go to my stop smoking group and I felt great. After 3 weeks I started getting some mild cravings but nothing I couldn't handle but I did mention it to the guy in charge of the stop smoking group and he gave me a couple of strips of 4mg lozenges! And so it began!

      At 1st I didn't even like them. They tasted slimy and I sucked it and spat it out but of course that was enough. I was hooked and when I mentioned it to the guy who gave them to me I was told I could take them for ever if I wanted to as they're better for me than fags. If only I had known then what I know now!

      About 6 yrs ago I started getting heartburn and integration. It got worse and worse until I collapsed. I was rushed into hospital (twice) where they found I had a badly infected gal bladder. The doctors couldn't understand it as I'm not over weight and I don't have a high fat diet. I'm not even much of a meat eater. I have a heathy diet. They just couldn't explain it and neither could I! I had to have my gallbladder removed but still I was plagued by stomach problems!

      A couple of years ago my dentist started to worry about my teeth! She started asking me if I have a high acid diet! I said no

      She then asked if I made myself sick. I said no why. She said I don't understand ( sounds familiar) why but your teeth seems to be under attack. The enamel is very thin. I've spent a fortune over the years trying to keep my teeth nice.!

      About 6 mths ago I started finding I was needing glasses to read more and more. I'd always had 20 20 vision so it came as a shock. The optician said I don't understand it ( now I do maybe I can explain it to them all) your eyes are tired and older than they should be. My eyesight is in rapid decline!

      After reading this article I've decided I have to stop the lozenges before they do any more damage. PLEASE anyone reading this PLEASE use them with caution. I'm going to give the fisherman friends ago and try and go cold turkey.

      Sorry this has been such a long post but I thought my story should be known.

    • profile image

      Lesley 5 years ago

      Having read What Mandi had to say have to comment on my dental problems too. My teeth are the same with the enamel thinning, and also a mouth infection that may or may not be related. My lord what is in these things!! Still on with the fishermans friends so had no lozengers at all. Will start to wean off these soon or there will have to be another forum to come off these tablets as well Lol !!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Mandi-- thank you so much for sharing all that. You made a connection for me that I had not thought of-- I knew that my gastric ulcers and borderling glaucoma were related to the nicotine lozenges but guess what-- I have had terrible problems with my teeth which has gotten somewhat better in the two years I have been off the lozenges. Wow-- my dentist couldn't understand why I kept getting cavities and having to have teeth capped even though I was brushing and flossing like a maniac. I have three dental implants now and for what I have spent on my teeth I could be traveling the world or driving a very expensive car-- damn!!!

      Lesley-- I still suck on sugerless hard candies, but am not addicted to them the way I was to nicotine lozenges. I imagine your Fisherman's friend addiction is not too serious but Kudos for getting off the nicotine. I was amazed at how much better I felt after I stopped.

    • profile image

      Cam 5 years ago

      Have been on lozenges for 6 years, not a minute goes by without one in my mouth.I went cold turkey yesterday with help from Allen Carr's book.Couldn't have done it without the advice from the book.I find lozenges more addictive than cigs as u can have one in your mouth every waking second. My advice is to be very careful with them.

    • profile image

      Barbarasue 5 years ago

      I did it! I've been off the lozenges almost a week now. I did the taper down method. In fact, I left the lozenges at home while I worked. I had 3 in the morning. And 3 in the evening, then 2' then 1 and on the last day I had one in the morning. I've been off a week now and...ITS HARD! I think all of us are looking for an easy way.....there isn't one. We just need to prepare ourselves that it WILL be hard. Anger at nicotine and addictions along with crying out to God, has given me strength. I used the Fishermens Friends lozenges for 2 days, but I have to warn you, it has an ingredient in it that is a stimulant. I didn't get any sleep while I was using them. I recommend regular cough drops....seems to have the same affect.

      Anyway...I feel confident that I've made it through the hard part. I still having cravings, but they last about 2 seconds. I'm pretty sure that I will never put myself through this again!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      WOW!!!! KUDOS BARBARASUE!!!!!! That is wonderful and thanks for taking time to come back here and share the good news with us. I am soooooooooo happy for you. I think you are right-- we all are looking for an easy way and there just isn't one-- however, maybe we could look at this as the two stages of quitting LOL Whatever-- you are now nicotine free and that is wonderful. I predict that in a couple of months you are going to feel even more wonderful as your body adjusts.

    • profile image

      Mandi 5 years ago

      After writing my last comment just over 3 weeks ago I decided to go cold turkey. I think I felt angry with myself for getting myself into this mess. I know I was looking for an easy way out of my addiction and the lozenges helped. It felt great to be able to say I was an ex smoker ( I did feel a bit of a cheat though if I'm honest as I was still getting my nicotine fix but it was great being able to get my fix while sat at the dinner table)! Anyway I decided after my last post enough was enough. I'm now happy to say I'm an ex smoker and an ex lozenger user. I'm using sugar free mints. I still have cravings and I've put on a bit of weight ( diet after Xmas). But I'm already feeling better. My purse is feeling better too! I've not had any nicotine in any form since my last post.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Wow Mandi-- that's great. Thanks for sharing and what a great Christmas gift to yourself. Congratulations and thanks for sharing your success here.

      I too felt soooo much better once I got off the lozenges. I think I really didn't know how bad they were making me feel till I got off them.

    • profile image

      J-Le 5 years ago

      Hi everyone, felt I owed you an update on the fishermans friends. I have managed to half the niquitine lozenges while using fishermans friends too, but I'm struggling to give them up completely :(. The problem now is because I used to have one constantly in my mouth, which I now substitute with a fishermans friend, I'm getting bored with them ...even swapping flavours! Somewhere in my brain there's a little voice saying 'YOU HAVEN'T HAD YOUR FIX!!'. Although most of the problems associated with the niquitine lozenge have improved my eyesight is still bad to the point where food on my dinner plate is blurred! I am long sighted, so I don't need glasses all the time just close up. I'm also aware that my age (46)may be playing a part in this but because of the rapid decline over the last few years and its a common factor here with everyone else its so worrying!!.

      Ok, maybe I should try going cold turkey? Best I go and warn everyone now :) to be continued......

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      holding my breath and keeping my fingers crossed for you J-Le. Congrats on cutting the nicotine in half and I know you will eventually kick the whole thing.

      BTW I am far sighted too and remember that I began to need to wear glasses for more than just reading in my late forties. I went to the eye doctor who explained to me that there are two kinds of far-sightedness-- one that you are born with( hyper-opia) and one that comes with age( presby-opia) and that I had them both . I've been wearing glasses full time since then

    • profile image

      Lesley 5 years ago

      Just another up date. Still off the lozengers and now off the fishermans friend and on to sugar free mints. Certainly am sleeping better but have put weight on. Do the lozengers speed up your metabolism does anyone know ?

    • profile image

      RavenNS 5 years ago

      nicotine does speed up your metabolism, so getting off the gum or lozenges will cause your system to slow down

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      That was my experience too-- I gained weight--went up a dress size, but after I had been off the lozenges for about a year I went to Weight watchers and took it off and it is still gone and I watch what I eat and get more exercise than I used to. Small price to pay IMO

    • profile image

      Lesa 5 years ago

      I am currently withdrawing from the lozenges after almost 3 years. The thing is i was a light smoker (less than 5 a day) before i started them. I wanted a quick fix and these seemed to be the answer.

      I don't know if I have suffered obvious side effects, although i do feel my teeth are weaker now. I've also made an effort to be really healty recently and still don't feel quite 'right' + irregular periods and i think these could be causing it. They're certainly not doing me any good are they?!I've taken 4/2 and now 1mg lozenges, ususally whatever was on offer/clearence at the shop to be honest.

      I've rencetly cut them down from my usual 5 a day to 2 (3 days ago) and last night went cold turkey. Even though I was on a low dose it's so hard. I'm struggling right now. I'm 24 hours in and keep telling myself to keep going, I don't need this addiction.

      There should absolutely be more research into the long-term side effects of this addiction. I have found very little. Just something somewhere saying 1mg of nicotine can kill a large rat? If it's true, then wow, that's scary. The people who know I am addicted to these think it's funny. There is nothing funny about this. In fact, it seems a very lonely addiction with noone to understand or encourage you to stop. I will report back and let you know if i am able to stay off the things. Good luck to tose you you who are trying to come off and thanks for the article.

    • profile image

      Barbarasue 5 years ago

      It's been about a month since I have quit the lozenges. The cravings are less frequent, but can still be overwhelming at times. Like I sai before; Fishermans Friend contains an ingredient that is a stimulant and was keeping me awake at night, so I use regular mentholated cough drops like Halls or generic. I'm still using the cough drops and slowly implementing regular mints. I'm feeling better overall now and I started working out again 2 days ago, whereas before I didn't have the energy.

      Also...just to note,I had mentioned earlier that I was diagnose with Angio Edema, which is a dreadful condition that can really mess up your appearance. I never had it before the lozenges and surprise,surprise, have not had one outbreak since I quit using the lozenges!

      My opinion is that we are using the lozenges to the point where we are building up toxic levels of nicotine, or something else thats in the lozenges, and it's making us sick. We all need to get angry and stop poisoning our bodies! The tobacco industry is known for dishonesty and they don't care about us, all they want is our money. Just my two-cents.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Keep going Lesa. It's really worth it to get off the lozenges. One reason I wrote this hub was to spread the word that these things are really toxic and I have been really amazed at the number of people who have left comments reflecting experiences similar to mine. I'm not so sure anymore that the lozenges are not as bad as cigarettes-- they may be just a bad in a different way-- like they totally destroy your teeth and gastro intestinal track-- more research NOT funded by big pharma or big tobacco please.

      Barbarasue-- you are amazing. Thank you so much for sharing your progress and the tips about Fishermens Friend and menthol cough drops and congratulations on kicking what is turning out to be a pretty nasty addiction. I totally agree with you. We need to spread the word about these lozenges. That's one reason I wrote this hub. Nicotine is a deadly poison and those of us who become addicted to the lozenges are just taking it in a different form than smokers. It says on the package not to use them for more than 3 months, but it is in small print and nobody tells you about these awful side effects.

      I bet your angio-edema has gone the way of my borderline glaucoma-- pfffft gone with the lozenges.

    • profile image

      me 5 years ago

      So, update after 6 weeks - lozenges are history! I did switch back to cigarettes for a couple of weeks, but guess what - those were easier to control and then to quit. I had flu for a couple weeks, which helped not to want any cigarettes. So now, I'm still with the flu - but haven't had any nicotine for 3 weeks, the cravings are very infrequent and are getting more and more on the psychological side. Which is much easier to handle :). I'm happy because despite the flu, I feel like 10 times better than with lozenges, or cigarettes :).

    • profile image

      Paula Drage 5 years ago

      I too have switched addictions and i'm really struggling to quit the lozenges. I'm now trying patches again to see if i can wean myself off the nicotine but i'm having trouble sticking with them as you dont get the same hit with a patch. i am suffering with alot of mouth ulcers and sore throats so its time to try and kick the habbit.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Try starting with the 14 mg nicotine patch and as many sugarfree hard candies or cough drops as you need. Needless to say, don't give into the cravings and don't smoke a cigarette. The first couple of days may be tough, but after three or four days it will be easier. After a week you may be ready to step down to the weaker patches. I think there are two or three different strenghth available. Keep going and let us know what happens. Good luck.

    • profile image

      Simba Lage 5 years ago

      29 have stg III copd cant quit even though its prying @ me that this diesease is killing me so young. pipe tobacco rolled in a tube when prices on tobacco went up is my flaw.. cold turkey doesn't work I have anxiety. quit once for a year and relapsed. married now and we both smoke any ideas? i am so addicted (4 packs a day) I smoke, chew gum and wear patches as I am now addicted to it all

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Simba, I think you need a doctor's help with this-- if you are smoking 4 packs a day and chewing gum and using the patch, that is really dangerous. You are going to poison yourself. At your level cold turkey is probably not an option-- and you need to get your wife to smoke outside and not smoke around you. With your COPD you definitely should not be around second hand smoke. I think you need to work with your doctor on this and I hope that the two of you can come up with a plan to taper you down and get you off nicotine gradually or send you to " nicotine detox" somewhere.

    • profile image

      Mandi 5 years ago

      Hi guys. Just a quick post to let your all know I'm still off the lozengers. I'm using some sugar free mints from aldi's. I buy them buy the dozen lol. I had a bad dose of sinusitis that lasted over Christmas but other than that I feel so much better. I hope you all are as lucky as I am and win your battle with the lozengers. Whenever I think I need a lozenger

    • profile image

      Mandi 5 years ago

      ..... I try to remember how addicted I was to them and then I get angry and I find the craving passes. I don't want to be a slave to them any more. Good luck everyone.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Kudos Mandi and a big round of applause. Isn't it great to be free??? Just like I didn't know how lousy smoking was making me feel till I stopped, I didn't know how tired and terrible the lozenges were making me feel until I stopped. Your experience and your generosity in sharing it in these comments makes me really really glad I wrote this hub. Thank you so much.

    • profile image

      Mandi 5 years ago

      NO, thank YOU. If it hadn't been for this hub I would still be on the lozengers and unaware of how ill they were making me. Thank you. Xxx

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Mwah-- we are a mutual admiration society :-))))

    • profile image

      Steve in Calgary 5 years ago

      12 weeks on lozenges and time to taper and quit. Great blog :)

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Congrats on quitting cigarettes and good luck with the tapering. Thanks for reading and commenting. Glad you found this helpful.

    • profile image

      Mar 5 years ago

      Wow! I just found this site while researching the effects of nicotine lozenges! So glad I found this!! I, too, like many other posters have been addicted to nicotine lozenges for almost 2 years. I smoked about a pack a day of cigarettes previously before I decided to quit and start the lozenges. The problem was that instead of tapering off of the lozenges like I should have, I just kept taking them and now I suck on them ALL day long! I don't even know how many a day I go through but I am guessing somewhere from 10 -12 a day of the 4mg. I freak out if I am running low and always have to run to the store to buy more! I have never worried about it, thinking that it was "safe" and better than cigarettes. I was wrong! I went to the dentist and he said the enamel on my teeth is thinning and I always have a cavity or two. He can't figure out why either but now I know why! I have also noticed that I always have gas or get bloated or I am irregular(never had this in the past). Now I know why!! I have got to quit these things! I have a very addictive personality and develop addictions easily. I also always kept taking the lozenges because they would keep me from eating all the time or gaining weight once I quit smoking. Now, I don't care, I just want to kick this habit! Thank you sooooo much for creating this hub, it has really helped me realize my addiction to these horrible lozenges.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Welcome to the club, Mar-- and thanks for posting here. There seems to be a growing body of evidence on the dangers of gum an lozenges growing in this comment section. Yes yes-- do get off the lozenges. I was the same as you and 10 or 12 4 mg lozenges gives you almost as much nicotine as a pack of cigarettes-- think about that when you want a lozenge and good luck...... let us know how it goes and add any tips you want to this comment thread.

    • profile image

      joyce 5 years ago

      i have quit cigarete for 9 weeks with the help of lozenges now i read others comments i would try sucking mints in place of lozenges till i come off them, thanks to all the helpful comments.

    • profile image

      Lesa 5 years ago

      hi, Just a quick update on my progress after a month. I have not had a lozenge in the whole month since I quit! I did buy the Fishermans friends and they did seem to really help in the early days. However I came off them because I coulnd't sleep at night. i have to admit I'm still having trouble sleeping a month down the line and wonder if this has something to do with the nicotine coming out of the system? Not sure really. i just feel really happy i managed to give these up after 3 years. Good luck to the rest of you. You really can do it. Not easy but after the first 4 or 5 days it gets easier. x

    • profile image

      Lesley 5 years ago

      Am now off the lozengers completely and have replaced them with mints as suggested. My daughter is quiting too but is using the electric ciggies. Hopefully this is not as bad as the lozengers ?

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Hooray for you, Lesley and I hope your daughter makes it too. I'll be interested in her experience using e-cigarettes as a quitting tool.

    • profile image

      Dawn 5 years ago

      Hi, My twin sister has been chewing the gum (4mg) for over 15 years. About a year ago she started to have pain in her feet. She had CAT scans done of her feet and it showed the bones were dying/dead in both feet. She had both feet operated on at different times, they had to put cadaver bone in there to try to correct the problem. She was still experiencing pain and went back for another cat scan. The scan showed that the bones had not fused together and the doctor wants to operate on both of them again.

      I think the gum has slowed/stopped the blood circulation to her feet and have caused the bones to die. Also I think the cadaver bones did not fuse because of the lack of blood going to her feet. The orthopedic surgeon could not explain the reason for these bones to just die. My sister told the doctor about chewing the gum. He said it could have caused this, but he doesn't know.

      HAS ANYONE ELSE OUT THERE HAD ANY PROBLEMS WITH THEIR FEET? Or circulation problems? I am very worried about my sister, she has not been able to walk for about 4 months because the the surgeries and now she has to start all over again. Not sure the second time around will work either, she still chews the gum. HELP!

    • profile image

      dave 5 years ago

      I'm an addict to the lozingers iv been on them for 14 months I am glad iv found this forum as I thought I was the only one after reading this it has give me thedetermination to get of them asap I found it easy to give tags up.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Good luck Dave and thanks for sharing here. Will be interested to hear more from you as you taper off and get off of all nicotine-- you are going to feel so much better you won't believe it!

    • profile image

      Loretta 5 years ago

      I am so glad I found this site. I have been hooked on the Lozenges for about 3 years now and it seems the first thing in the morning I look for them and have one in my mouth most of the day. For two years now I have had constant throbbing pain in my right foot. I have been to lots of different kinds of doctors and even went to UI Hospital in Indianapolis, but they can not find what is causing this pain. I am wondering if the pain now is coming from taking the lozenges. I guess I need to stop them and see. Has anyone else had this kind of pain? Thanks for all the comments, I haven't lost any hair, so guess that is good.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Hi Loretta and thanks for commenting here. Have no idea if your foot pain has anything to do with nicotine or not-- actually kind of doubt it but one thing is for sure, if you can unload the lozenges you will feel better and if they do have something to do with your foot pain, it will disappear, so it is worth doing. Good luck and keep us posted here on your progress.

    • debbieryan profile image

      debbieryan 5 years ago

      I took your advice about 3 months ago and started a journal, didn't need to do it for long to realize that I sucked on lozenges from first thing in the morning literally into the night with the rare time out to drink and eat. I had noticed that I panicked if I thought I weren't going to have one and I quickly recognized the same procastination techniques that I had experienced for years while trying to quit smoking. I felt hopeless. Then I got mad. Really mad at myself. I did not do any of the things that I did to quit smoking. No goal date. No seeking support of close circle of people in my life. I did nothing but in the back of my mind I planted the seed that it WOULD happen and it would happen SOON! Of course life threw me a few stressors to make the journey bumpy. I felt a bug coming on, you know the one you just watched your coworker go through for the last week and you know you are going to have a few miserable days ahead of you. I got in to see the doctor, started on a z pack in case it would help alleviate the symptons and went home and climbed in bed. I decided this was as good a time to quit as any, I was going to be half wishing I were dead any way. Just for the record every night when I went to bed I had to have a fresh lozenge to go to bed with. Well, after 3 months of planting and replanting the seed. it almost seemed like a good idea as weird as that sounds. I went to bed and in the morning and put a lozenge on my tongue out of habit and it tasted horrible you know just like that first cig you lit up after quitting for 6 months. It tastes incredibly horrid yet the connection it makes in your brain ensures you would get over it and in that very moment I realized it was so simple and I knew I had it beat!!! I hope to never get past the nasty taste that I now associate it with. In the first 2 days I napped a lot. I now realize I always had the power, I just never exercised it. Kinda like Dorothy and her shoes lol I am going to try apply it to other areas of my life and I really am celebrating not being a slave to them any more! I feel so confident that I am giving away the rest of the boxes I have left. Don't ever quit quitting, practice makes perfect. Thank you for letting me know that I was not alone!! Good luck to you all, you CAN do it!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      What a wonderful wonderful story and thank you for leaving it here in this thread. Applause all around-- It is no small thing to take back your power and I am sure this will be like a pebble in the water that will radiate out to all parts of your life. I went and looked at your profile and see that you haven't written any Hubs yet and I'm hoping that you will expand this profound and beautiful comment into a hub of your own. You have a lot to say, I think and I defeinitely want to hear it all.

    • profile image

      Rebecca 5 years ago

      I am shocked at how many other people are finding it hard to stop using tge lozenges! I have asked 2 health professionals to help me and they have both said,' its fine.. Stay on the lozenges, they are much better for you than the cigs'.. My problem is though that i am fully aware i am addicted to them, gave up smoking in November last year when i was diagnosed with asthma. I have had about 15 lozenges a day since and cant bare the thought of cutting down!! I am so happy i have found this website and will definitely try some of the ideas on here. I know i need to stop them soon as i have been suffering from palpitations, headaches, feeling sick and a swollem abdomen. I also feel really tense at times and depressed that i am still an addict and still rely on that little dose of nicotine to get me through the day!

    • profile image

      Kelsea 5 years ago

      Agh! This is terrible! i am addicted to the gum myself and i'm not sure what to do... I've been chewing it for almost a year now and i have a pack of 4mg a day... It's terrible, i've been cutting down a tiny bit.. seeing how i might have major health problems... but it's really hard for me because i used to chew tabbaco. So, in a sense its kind of the same thing. Without them i feel like utter shit... i get migraines, no sleep.... and really stressed. I might even start smoking to be honest, i haven't ever been addicted to cigarettes but now.. i walk up like 5 steps and i'm out of breath! insane! The gum is horrible!

    • profile image

      thanks 5 years ago

      Thanks so much for writing this and keeping the dialogue going. I'm on day 75 of quitting smoking through the aid of the mini lozenge. I tried to ween myself from 4 mg to 2mg but went back to 4mg with the next purchase. That's when I knew I was heading into stormy weather. I'm replacing addictions. I'm very proud of myself for quitting smoking, but I know I need to quit lozenges before I create another (transfer the?) mess. Thanks to this thread, I have some tools to help me do it and before my 90th day of not smoking, I will be free from the NRT. Thank you Robie and all of the posters. You've given me the courage to take care of this now. NRT gave me the courage to quit 75 days ago, but now it's time to go it alone! Good luck to all!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Kelsea thanks for sharing your experience with the lozenges. I can see that for someone who used to chew tobacco they would present a special challenge. I hope you can wean yourself-- maybe things that have helped some of the posters in this thread will help you too. Don't try cigarettes-- If you think you are huffing and puffing on the stair now, you will be much worse after taking smoke into your lungs and cigarette smoke has other bigtime problems as well.

      thanks-- so glad you stopped by and good luck to you. Please come back and let us know how it is going. Whatever you do don't smoke.

    • profile image

      Cathy 4 years ago

      I am not going to go into my problems with lozenges as it is basically the same as everyone else above. It has been 8 years for me now and I have also had health professionals tell me it is fine to keep using them. With all the people who have written about their experiences above, is it possible for you to take it to higher ground and demand testing be done. The companies who supply these products should have to adhere to the strict conditions cigarette companies have to abide by, they are by no means the answer to anyone's problems.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Thanks Cathy for making the point. Some real independent studies on the long term use of Nicotine Replacement Therapy are long overdue--While the gum and lozenges are manufactured to strict pharmeceutical standards, and there is a warning about prolonged use on the package-- nobody takes it very seriously and they should.

      Nicotine Gum and lozenges are like the methadone of nicotine and doctors say the same thing to smokers as they do to heroin addicts-- i.e. this is better and safer than smoking or shooting heroin so don't worry.

      It is time to assess the real impact of long term use of nicotine gum and lozenges and the reality of addiction to them.

    • profile image

      Aseffa 4 years ago

      Good article. I've been using the nicotine lozenge to quit and because of slip ups on the second month it got pushed back 3 more months. i read an article saying that most smokers addicted to the lozenge or gum could successfully quit using regular mint or cherry gum or lozenge like texters. I'm not addicted to it thank god. i just have the habit of having something sit on the side of my mouth while i'm on the computer. so i just started using regular peppermints. it helps.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      That's great, Aseffa-- and congratulations on giving up smoking. Really glad you have had an easy time transitioning to regular gum and lozenges. Thanks for sharing.

    • profile image

      Ste1959 4 years ago

      I need some serious help. I have not smoked in almost 3 years. I smoked for 31 years.

      I still use the nicotine lozenges daily. Probably around 10 per day. I bite off little pieces like some kind of crack addict.

      I am hopelessly addicted to the lozenges now and I think it is affecting my health. Palpating teeth issues, stomach issues. I almost feel like scraping the whole damn quit and finish my days smoking. I signed up for life insurance and they are coming out Friday to swab my mouth looking for nicotine. Yes... I signed up as a non smoker. I have to go cold turkey in the morning. I think if I fail I might just go back to the horrible cigarettes and give up. I almost feel like I just can't win.

    • profile image

      Ste1959 4 years ago

      I meant to say palpations.

      Also it's triggered bad anxiety.

      I have got to flush this out in 4 days in order to pass the nicotine test. Plus I am so sick and tired of being addicted PERIOD.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      I hear you Ste1959-- First things first. How about postponing the life insurance interview for a week or two-- just reschedule the appointment to give yourself a little breathing room. Then, go out and get a package of nicotine patches ( the strongest ones) throw out the nicotine gum and slap on a patch. Chew real gum, suck on hard candies and do what you need to but do not, under any circumstances, have micotine in any form other than the patch. Try to get through just one day this way and take it one day at a time. Use a new patch every day for at least a week. When you feel comfortable, step down to the weaker patches and do them for at least a week. Next find a support group and buy a lot of non nicotine hard candy and gum and when you are down to the lowest nicotine patch for at least a week, jump off the cliff and go without any nicotine replacement-- if you can get through a day with no patch, keep going one day at a time and reschedule your insurance interview.

      Above all, don't do what you are doing now. You are setting yourself up for failure by putting all that pressure on yourself. Good luck. Got my fingers crossed for you.

    • profile image

      Ste1959 4 years ago

      Ok

      Thank you

      I bought the 3rd step patch today. I plan to only use 5 and go completely without after that. I can only postpone the insurance tech for 2 weeks.

      I hope that 9 days will be enough to not detect any traces of nicotine when they do the swab.

      Aside from that.. I want to be completely free. I know those lozenges can't be good for you.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Great Ste-- I know you can do it. Keeping my fingers crossed. You are going to feel soooooooo good when you are totally nicotine free. I promise

    • profile image

      Ste1959 4 years ago

      Jeez

      This is not going as smooth as I had hoped. 24 hrs using the 7mg patch and I caved and had I 2mg lozenge.

      I have to make sure I can do without both by Saturday.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      One 2mg lozenge is not the end of the trail. Get rid of the lozenges-- get them out of the house so you won't be tempted. Now is the time to keep going with the patch. Ride the cravings through and stick with the patch only. I know it's hard, but starting over later will be harder. The amount of nicotine in your system is coming down. Just stick with it and give it time.... I;m pulling for you.

    • profile image

      Ste1959 4 years ago

      I'm hanging in there. I gave to get rid of the lozenges tomorrow. I had a half of one tonight.

    • profile image

      pfunk 4 years ago

      smoked for 20 years. stopped in 2008. been hooked on lozenges for 3. i quit them things yesterday. felt worse than shit yesterday. asked jesus to help me through it. this morning i feel great. thank you jesus. if you don't got faith in your self ask a higher power.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      pfunk-- thanks for adding that. Like they say, there are no aetheists in foxholes, and addiction is definitely a foxhole. I never under-estimate the power of prayer and congrats on getting off the lozenges.

    • profile image

      D2 4 years ago

      I rate this as helpful info. On a scale of 1-10 , it would have to be a 10

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Thanks D2-- pass the word. I think more people should just be aware that getting hooked on the lozenges is a possibility and be prepared-- not that they cannot really be helpful. I don't think I could have quit without them-- but if you stay on them longer than a few months they can be dangerous too.

    • profile image

      Lil Poison tablets 4 years ago

      2 pack a day smoker for 10 years quit several times using lozenges only to go right back into a full 2 pack a day habbit. Last attempt at quitting was in feb of this year and so far been very good and haven't cheated once. But I am addicted to those damn lozenges again. While not as expensive as ciggs they are arent much cheaper. A tube of 4 mg every other day gets expensive. I am out of them and am going to try distracting myself with gardeneing and chores to finally rid myself of my nicotine addiction for good. As a side note the lozenges name brand and generic give me horrific painful gas. So much and so loud it scares the cats.

    • profile image

      Debbie 4 years ago

      Thank you so much, Robie 2. I read this post string initially about 3 months ago. It got me seriously thinking that I should probably create a cessation plan. I had been chewing Nicotine gum for the last five years. I had fluctuated in my usage, but had gotten up to 15 pieces a day and had far exceeded the cost of cigarettes on the gum and was wondering what the negative health impacts were. Anyhow - I didn't figure I needed to keep at it to see if I could have the same problems others on the site shared. So, I got myself to 10 pieces a day for a week and then jumped down to six and was going to do that for two weeks and then taper down one piece every two weeks. I don't think I believed I could do it, but there were so many others on this site with WAY heavier consumption habits who did it, so couldn't I? Shouldn't I? I purchased nicotine patches in the event I freaked out. I also purchased a ton of Trident cinnamon gum. But then something magical happened - I went down to two pieces after about 3 days on 6 pieces. I hovered there for a few days and then went down to one piece at night and stayed there for about a week and then I was done. I never used the patch. I just quit. We won't talk about how much weight I've gained - but I think it is related to thyroid issues more than anything else. But I digress. It was this forum which afforded me the courage and belief that I could do it. I smoked cigarettes for almost 25 years and then finally gave it up only to get totally as addicted to the gum for five years. Oddly enough, I don't know the date of my last piece of gum, but it's been about a month or so and I am not going back. For the first time in my adult life, I am free from nicotine. Thank you Robie 2 and every other person on this site with the courage to quit and share your story! May we all continue to inspire others! Freedom!!!!

    • profile image

      Heidi 4 years ago

      I am so glad I have found this site. I have felt like I was so alone in all of this frickin addiction of the lozenges. I quit smoking 7 years ago, and started the lozenges. I loved them because while at work, or inside, I could have nicotine in my system. I was highly addicted to them, and am still currently on them, over 7 years now. Ridiculous. It is such a bad addiction, they are so expensive.....listen, when money got tight, I would struggle, do I buy lozenges or buy food. I bought the lozenges and felt I cheated my family out. Horrible. I have a $10.00 coupon off that I have had for years. When the date expires, I cut off the date of a regular coupon and carefully attach it, and re copy it. When I add up all the cost of 1.5 boxes per month, this adds up to oh my gosh, I have spent over LOOK AT THIS: $1800.00 per year, and over 7 years $12,600.00. This is all my fault, but I wish I could sue this company!!!!!!!! I could have bought a new car with this, took a family vacation. I hate this addiction. I am so frustrated and believe it or not, scared to quit. I go thru 20 lozenges per day right now, and if I quit, my body is going to freak. I only have like 10 lozenges left, and really, really want to try to quit. I read the above about the cough drops and fisherman's tablets and am going out today to get them. I am a very new grandmother now, and want to be there for her. My abdominal pains are so intense now, my throat hurts, and my vision is actually starting to change as well. This is my fault, and I am scared, but I really have to try this time. Wish me luck, and thanks for all ya'lls comments above. This I know will help me.

    • profile image

      Heidi 4 years ago

      Me again. Sorry I went off above. Just the frustration talking. So, today, going to finish my lozenges, cut them in half until gone, which will be today. I am going to purchase the fishermans mints today and pray those help, and I think with the determination of needing and wanting to quit these, they will. Let me tell y'all something. I am 43. Went thru 1.5 boxes of lozenges per week. The above amounts I spent are correct. I have an addiction that I want to combat. I have Rhuematoid Arthritis, Irritable Bowel and Ulcerative Collitis (recent diagnosis by the way), sore throats, headaches, stomach pain, and dry cough. Thank you for allowing me to tell my story. I am too embarrassed to tell my doctor. I know writing this will help me, as I have never, ever told anyone about this true addiction. Wish me luck, and I will be praying A...Lot :)

    • profile image

      Heidi 4 years ago

      Well, this is it! I am sucking on my last lozenge right now. I have a diagnostic mammogram in about an hour, so stressful there, due to a lump found. So, fisherman's I am counting on you, and God, I am whole heartedly needing you!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Good luck, Heidi--got my fingers and toes and everything else crossed for you. hang in!

    • profile image

      dddugspur 4 years ago

      I am so happy to find this discussion, because I am addicted to the lozenges also. I smoked for about 30 years, chain smoking at last. I tried every method of quitting, and finally after my workplace went smoke free, I knew I had to quit work or quit smoking. I started with a quit date (the Monday before the great American smoke-out on Thursday). I used patches with the lozenges, ( I know, but it worked for me). I had tried gum before, but it caused dental problems. I have not smoked in 3 1/2 years, but I suck on the logenges constantly, more than when I was quitting. I have to have one when I get up, then all through the day. Especially in stress situations when we have meetings, I fill up my pockets. I have made several attempts to quit, but so far I run back to them when the withdrawl starts. I use the off- brands which have asperme, and I wonder if that doesn't make the addiction worse. I have stomach pains and terrible gas, dread being in a room with people. My teeth are browner than when I smoked, and I have had mouth sores. I am going to try keeping a notebook as you suggested, and try to get off of the logenzes for good. Advise to anyone out there who still smokes, though, this is a problem but it is still so much better than smoking.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Good luck and keep us posted. The notebook will help you know how many lozenges you are really doing each day give you a baseline you can work from. It is a real addiction and takes some doing to unload, but if you quit smoking cigarettes you can quit the lozenges too. Hang in.....

    • profile image

      Heidi 4 years ago

      Well, since my above blog, I did go cold turkey at first, but the withdrawls were very intense. My daughter told me to go and buy the 2mg lozenges, so I did. I am actually glad that I did this, as my withdrawls are gone. I have cut way back, making one box last 2 whole weeks instead of the 4mg of a box every week. This next box purchase, my goal is to make this last for 3 weeks...yes! The one big reason for me to finally rid this addiction, is of course my health, but look at so many people's comments above, as well as mine, it's the MONEY SPENT! I am going to treat myself like a queen to so many other things :)

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Go Heidi-- I found that I had to taper off too because of the withdrawal. But once I cut my lozenge consumption in half I could not believe how much more energy I had and how much better I felt and that just reinforced my will to go on. And really realizing how much money I was spending was also a spur to continue It's amazing isn't it? Take that money every week and buy something nice just for you is my advice--thanks for sharing here.

    • profile image

      sunshine 4 years ago

      yep, quit smoking over 2 1/2 yrs ago, but stuck on lozenges, still got the cough, and occasional upset stomach.. cold turkey is the best way, cannot give up lozenges, say I am going to cut down, but don't and buy them where they are the cheapest and buy the store brand, big chain store, try to cut down on them, I did good with the patch and someone gave me lozenges.. darn it... patch would've gotten me to quit altogether , lozenges are better than smoking, but so hard to quit. my new lozenge quit date is august 1st. or sooner,, I know I will be a witch, but only for a few days, so maybe during the week of the fair, I'll quit since i go daily and by myself. we shall see.

    • profile image

      Sal 4 years ago

      Hello! I read this last week and I was really grateful to find it, but, of course, I was horrified. I've been happily chewing the nicotine gum for about three years, now, and craving it so that I was chain-chewing, like a chain-smoker!

      Since the shock of last week, though, things have improved. I stopped all at once, substituting similarly flavoured, strong mint, ordinary chewing gum. So far, it's been fine. OK, it's only been a week, but I thought you might like to know, in case anyone else wants to try stopping but is scared. You might be lucky, like me, and find that just chewing hard on some ordinary gum is enough to get you over the cravings. They do disappear after three days!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      That's wonderful Sal. Congratulations on getting off the nicotine gum and thanks for sharing your experience here. I'm sure it will help give people the courage to quit.

    • profile image

      Jim 4 years ago

      Great work Rob, very good article. I too replaced the fags with lozenges/mints and it was a clear case of replacing one addiction with another.

      I also found Fishermans Friend to get off the mints and lozenges and it actually worked quite well. It was really the hit I was after and the hit you get from fishermans friend (the strong ones!) did the trick for me.

      Great work again Rob.

      To those trying to kick the nicotine addiction (ciggs or lozenges), all I can say is hang in there, never, ever give up trying (to quit that is!).

    • profile image

      lou 4 years ago

      Thanks to this blog I can now say I am nicotine free for 8 weeks. I smoked around twenty a day for 6 yrs then became hooked on 4mg lozenges for 2 yrs. I became aware my previously thick hair was thinning and perfect teeth were becoming stained. I think I suffered from mild panic attacks and crushing insomnia!! I decided to quit by reducing to 1.5 mg lozenges for a month then taper off intake. I can say it has been far from easy, I still have insomnia 8 weeks down the line but not all the time which is an improvement. Also I still feel anxious about the whole thing but hell will freeze over before i return to nicotine. My skin looks fresh, headaches are gone as are cravings. I look at smokers now and pity them! Does anyone have any idea if hair regrows after time? Good luck everyone, if I can do it anyone can!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Congrats Lou-- here's to your new clean nicotine life and thanks for sharing your experience with us here. Yayyyyy for you.

      Have not got a clue about hair regrowth--and of course, hair loss is not necessarily related to nicotine, so I guess you'll just have to wait and see what happens.

    • profile image

      Aseffa 4 years ago

      what's up it's aseffa again i found these homeopathic lozenges that are nicotine free and can not only help people get off cigarettes and the withdrawal but the addiction of the nicotine replacement. It's a homeopathic lozenge called Natrabio stop it stop smoking. It says on it that it can help people get off addiction to all types of nicotine weather replacement or cigarettes. http://www.swansonvitamins.com/NTB014/ItemDetail I haven't tired it myself because i quit with the lozenge & didn't become addicted too it but i hope someone will find this helpful if there struggling to get off nicotine period.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Hey thanks, Asetta. Hope some people who read this find that link helpful. Sounds good.

    • profile image

      A. Lee 4 years ago

      I found your Hub by searching "nicotine gum habit drives me nuts." I've known my husband more than 12 years and he has been a smoker a few times during that time. The last time he quit smoking, he used nicotine gum and then just never stopped. I'm a really by-the-rules type of person, so it really bugs me he has been using for years even though the package says don't do it more than three months. I have tried to convince him the risks are not known, nicotine is not good for you and his answer is that he doesn't believe it's bad and he likes it - it helps him focus. I can't even describe how much I hate it and how much it drives me crazy, mostly because I worry that he is harming himself with it and because he constantly has a piece in his mouth. Ugh. I have tried to accept it and don't nag him about it anymore, but I loathe that habit!

    • profile image

      Jayne 4 years ago

      Hello, I read this article with great interest as I have been addicted to lozenges for about 2 or 3 years now. I have tried so many times to give them up, but it was just like trying to give up the fags. And normal mints or sweets don't help because it's the nicotine I am craving. Please help me someone.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Hi Jayne-- try tapering off the lozenges and riding through the cravings. It takes some doing, but you can get unhooked and it really is worth doing. Thanks for posting here, and good luck

    • profile image

      Jayne 4 years ago

      Hi Robie, thank you for your reply. How long on average do you think I will have the cravings for? It is complete murder lol

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      The cravings are murder, I agree and they are hardest to manage at the beginning-- they space out as time goes on and ( here comes the discalaimer) there are huge individual differences. The secret to fighting them is to know that no matter how intense the cravings are, they won't last more than 10 or 15 minutes. Knowing that helped me a lot. When you are in the middle of it, it feels like it will never go away, but knowing that it will made a huge difference for me.... hope it helps you. Hang in and don't give up.

    • profile image

      caz2109yorkie 4 years ago

      Hi I am so glad I have found this site. I have been a non smoker for twelve years and having been taking nicotine lozenges ever since. I sometimes can have up to 60 a day one after the other. I crunch them sometimes like sweets and need to have one as soon as a I wake up. Ive mentioned it a couple of times to my doctor but he says its better than smoking. Having read this website I know I need to get off these things. I was healthier when I smoked. I am 47 but had early menopause at 40 have been diagnosed with coeliac disease and take three antidepressants a day. I married later in life and was desperate to have a family however it wasn't possible and I now truly believe the cause of this was these lozenges as my periods stopped so suddenly. I feel out of breath easily and when I do try to exercise I sweat really badly. I have to go for tests as I cannot swallow properly and wonder if this could also be a side effect after taking them for so long. I have so many cavities and the dentist has said they are really unusual ones. Its at the part of my mouth where I suck them. I spend a fortune on them and would say they rule my life. I cannot imagine going without a lozenge even for a day. I hope somebody can help me because I seem to have an addictive nature first cigs and now these lozenges. Can somebody tell me what to expect coming off them. I am irritable at the moment if I dont get my fix. If I am in a meeting I stuff my pockets with them and I am constantly rustling in my bag to get one. I keep loads of them in my car so I pop them into my mouth one after the other. Please please please can anybody help me. I would urge anyone not to take these lozenges Thank you for listening to my story

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      HI caz2109yorkie and thanks for sharing your personal experience with lozenges here. I really didn't know when I wrote this hub about my own addiction to them, how many of us there were. If you read through the thread you'll see that a number of people have shared how they got off the lozenges. I hope their stories help you too.

      I know what you mean about using the lozenges like cigarettes-- I did exactly the same thing and had to have one first thing in the morning, after meals, and anytime I was bored or stressed. Maybe it would help you to break the psychological triggers if you stopped using the lozenges totally, cold turkey, but switched to the patch-- just wondering if that could keep the physical cravings manageable while you break the mental triggers-- just a thought.

      There is no easy way to do this and everybody is different, but it is worth it I assure you and I still think the medical world should do some research into people who become addicted to the gum and lozenges because I know now that there are a lot of horror stories out there. However you do it, just take it day by day or hour by hour and think of all the money you will save and how much better you will feel. Good luck and keep us posted here.

    • profile image

      caz2109yorkie 4 years ago

      hi robie2 thanks for getting back to me so quickly. I am really worried about my health now. Did you have any throat problems. I also meant to say that despite having laser eye surgery a few years ago my eyesight seems to have deteriorated. Is that another symptom?? The patch might be a good idea dont know what to do. I wish I could stop cold turkey. I am sucking a lozenge as I am writing this. I am spending a fortune on these too.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Don't panic and don't be too quick to blame all your health issues on the lozenges. No, I didn't have throat problems, but I did get stomach ulcers and lots of indigestion. I'm thinking that for you, the best thing to do as a first step is to get a little notebook and write down every lozenge you take for 24 hours. That will at least give you an honest baseline of how many you use a day and a place to start. Don't even think about what you have to give up, just consider it an experiment to see exactly how many you use per day and then you can also calculate how much your habit is really costing you. Once you have a baseline, you may find it easier to make a plan. At the very least getting totally honest with yourself about how many lozenges you really use will be a reality check and a motivator and if you care to share the results here, please do:-))) Good luck. I'm crossing my fingers for you.

    • profile image

      caz2109yorkie 4 years ago

      ok thanks. I will keep a notebook first and take it from there. will keep you posted. many thanks for taking the time to reply so soon.

    • profile image

      Loz 4 years ago

      I agree, more testing and made public. Been on lozenges for about 3 months, not one cig. With that being said I'm down to my last 2 boxes of lozenges and well still have cig crazings. I agree with the guy who said you have to have the "will" sometimes people are stronger than at other times. Its been a fight for me even after many family members have had health problems or died most likely from smoking. I will muster up the will or I will hope like crazy to find the will, shortly. Your plan is one I had thought of and keep planning on doing "keeping notes of use". I could tell I was trading one habit for another once I didn't need the cigs any more, than I knew this was going to be a struggle.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Congrats of being an ex smoker, Loz -- and forewarned is forearmed. Sounds like you are not ready to give up the lozenges yet and that is ok-- they are doing their job and keeping you off the cigarettes and that is a lot better than smoking. You will know when you are ready-- and when the time comes you will wean yourself I am sure. In the meantime, having gotten off cigarettes is no small thing-- hats off to you and thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment. Keep us posted

    • profile image

      Sally 4 years ago

      Hi I have just found this as Ive been totally addicted to the gum for over 5 years Im too embarassed to say how much I use but I definitely use too much I have never tried to give up and spend about £30 per week on my habit which I CANNOT afford. Im going to finish what Ive got and use the advice of Sal (thanks) and try and replace with normal gum problem is I like the regular flavour of the nicotene gum not mint and Ive searched and searched but cant find a normal flavoured (not mint) chewing gum anyone got any ideas? Im going to go cold turkey as Im not disciplined enough to control my intake have tried this and failed. Im really scared of giving up and have been meaning to for years how pathetic is that! What a great site for us addicts Im too embarassed to tell anyone about my problem and my husband and children have no idea but gosh £30 a week adds up over a year and Im looking forward to having more money. I am overweight already so fearful of putting on weight but I know I will feel so much happier to be free of this stupid gum habit I agree with all the comments above not enough is known and some of the health effects Ive read sound awful. Well done to everyone who has given up and wish me luck thanks to robi for setting this up. How long do the cravings last Im hoping 3 days max. THanks

    • profile image

      Loz 4 years ago

      Thanks for the vote of confidence Robie2. After reading many of these posts I started keeping track of how many I'm using. Yesterday I used 8 of the 2mg. - today I will make sure I use no more and maybe 7. I just don't want to push it to fast but I do realize I gotta get my butt in gear here, the whole idea was to quit. Now I realize its mostly a drug addiction and not a habit I feel I may have the upper hand for once in my life. FYI, I started smoking around 12, probably wasn't addicted till 16 and well I'm 50 now. I quit cold turkey for 12wks when I had cancer or they wouldn't perform surgery. After surgery and driving myself to radiation for 6wks//after seeing all those people, young old with cancer.....geee wouldn't you think I would have got it than. Well we can all say someday but the problem is when that day comes it will probably be to late, its amazing what you can do when its your life at risk. Amazing how dumb we get when we find out we will live possibly to life expectancy. I will never forget that night, sneaking out of bed, getting into my wife's coat, grabbing one and lighting it, sitting on the floor in front of the wood stove listening to the January wind blow, almost falling over and acting like a drunk trying to stand cause I was so dizzy. That was my first night, everyone knows what happened the next night. Cigarettes should be outlawed. not hike up the prices and put you into poverty, just outlawed...no more. I learned when Obama raised the prices and stopped my shipments from the indian reservation, like the ole timers roll your own, can't beat that $$$ anywhere. You can always find away if that's what you want. I feel fortunate for the lozenges they took away the habit now the drug addiction is up to me and I know I can prevail there...just little by little will get you there but make a plan in your head. Whether it be one less per day each week or whatever works but make it realistic with an ending in site. Thanks for use of your site Robie2

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      HI Sally and Loz--Thanks to you both for sharing your lozenge experiences here.

      Sally--Good for you. Cold turkey is great if you can do it-- I think three days is about right for the cravings but it is a very individual thing. What I remember is how intense they are when they are happening. I used to set a timer for ten minutes and make myself wait-- they rarely lasted longer than that and it was like riding a wave. But I have to admit that I tapered off one lozenge at a time and did not go cold turkey-- however you do it, you will be so happy once it is done. I was spending about $45.00 a week ( I think that's about the same as you) and I found it very helpful to take $45.00 every week and put it in a jar. Something about seeing the money I was saving was very motivating:-) You probably will gain some weight but don't worry about it-- you can take it off and most people do.

      Hi Loz-- yes-- going down one lozenge at a time leaves you in control and works as long as you stay on top of the situtaion and it sounds like you know what to do. I'd say set a specific goal( one less a day or a week of whatever) and write down every lozenge you use. It's easy to lose track and sabotoge yourself if you don't.

      Good luck to both of you and don't forget to come back and let us know how it is going.

    • profile image

      caz2109yorkie 4 years ago

      Hi Robie2 I have been keeping a diary since 20 August and am now down to only three lozenges per day. When should I stop them completely and what withdrawal symptoms should I expect? Caz x

    • profile image

      Mr Billygoat 4 years ago

      3 and a half years I've been sucking the lozenges, my story is very much the same as most others here. I am chuffed to bots about giving up smoking but have swapped one addiction for another. Never realised about the ulcers being a problem. My main issue is the trapped wind !!,, being sat in a office for 10 hours on a hard chair is something the Spanish inquisition could have dreamt up as a torture, the pain of having to hold it on, sorry to be so graphic. Anyway the comments given have made me decide once and for all to stop, tomorrow is Monday day off work so good positive day to do it. I think it will boil down to old fashioned willpower, good luck as well to all fellow addictives, hope you all win your own story. Great page by the way, it had really given me impetus to stop the silliness of the lozenge. Here goes to a new start !!

    • profile image

      sally 4 years ago

      I gave in at the weekend and bought another pack grrrrrrrr so cross with myself going to try once these have run out thanks so much for your comments Robie I know the money is a great motivator particularly with Christmas coming. I really cannot afford the gum anymore. Wish I could cut down but I know from when I quit smoking I am an all or nothing kind of girl Im useless at cutting down have tried and failed numerous times. Should have run out of gum towards the end of the week and will let you know how I go

      this link is great thanks for your help I felt so alone and stupid before I realised Im not the only one

      Sally

    • profile image

      A2Laura 4 years ago

      Robie, what a great article. It states the facts, and it is helpful and compassionate, while not sugar coating the fact that we traded one addiction for another. I smoked for 15 years, and then was on the lozenges for over a year. My god how I loved them! I loved my first lozenge of the day alongside my morning cup of coffee far more than I ever looked forward to that first smoke. It didn't burn my throat or make me smell bad.

      I loved the taste and I especially loved the impact it had on my appetite. I never had to worry about dieting on the lozenges. If I felt hungry, I'd just grab one from my purse. My biggest fear coming off the lozenges was weight gain, but that hasn't happened. I'm actually even down a pound since I quit them, possibly because there were a couple days when I didn't feel well. At all. Not going to lie.

      I want to offer an alternative to your tapering method. I have an extraordinarily addictive personality. There are people who become addicted to nicotine such as yourself, and there are people like me who are just plain wired to be addicts, period.

      I tried to do the lozenge taper for about six months, but for me, I would get only so far and then start moving in the opposite direction,. What I had to do was just draw a line in the sand and be done. However, I knew I was facing TWO problems: first was the psychological factor of my mental dependence on lozenges, and the conditioned behavior of putting the lozenge in my mouth. If I felt hungry, I'd eat a lozenge. If I felt scared, sad, angry, happy - any feeling at all it seems- I'd eat a lozenge. Over a year off cigarettes found me going through 20 a day! Second to the mental obsession was the physical withdrawal. For me, the former was my bigger enemy, and I knew it. So I started by addressing the behavior of putting lozenges in my mouth every 40 minutes.

      I went up north for a weekend where I wouldn't be able to buy lozenges without driving for an hour. I made myself accountable to my spouse who supported the plan. I brought a few patches. For the first week off lozenges, I wore a 14 mg patch, while I addressed my mental obsession. The first couple days without ingesting lozenges - I thought I would crack! That is why the patch was worn for a week - to keep the physical skin crawls at bay. After a week without lozenges, I stopped wearing the patch. It was about three days of getting the nicotine out of my system. I was irritable, cranky and temperamental - in other words, not fun to be around at all! But I stuck with it, because at a certain point I realized I was either going to see it through now, or resign myself to a lifetime of dependence on lozenges. I'm 35 and a woman, and for me that would have meant forever shutting the door on having another child. At least, lozenge and nicotine free, the door can be cracked open another year or so!

      But I also find that the lozenges served as almost an "adult pacifier" and that now that I'm completely nicotine free, I feel a more wide range of emotions. I give major props to anyone who can get off the lozenges or the gum after a year or more. Thanks SO much for writing about this, Robie!!

    • profile image

      sally 4 years ago

      im doing it today giving up my 5 year gum addiction replacing nicotene gum with normal mint stuff as I cant find a plain one today this blog has inspired me to do it plus the heavy financial burden of the gum which costs a fortune here in the UK. Im ashamed to confess I spend about £100 per month on it.

      I feel really scared how sad is that I have 6 pieces of gum left and then its cold turkey for me as Im a true addict and cannot cut down been trying for years

      Wish me luck and thanks for all the support this site has given nothing else like it on the internet

      Sally

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      oh my goodness-- it's been a few days since I checked the comments here and I see so many of you embarking on the quitting journey together and sharing your experience here. Good luck to you all and special thanks to A2Laura for the excellent suggestion about using the patch. Sally-- I'm wondering if her suggestion might not be a good one for you. If you are really frightened about cold turkey, you might want to try the patch as a way of tapering as suggested by A2Laura.

      caz2109yorkie -- I think only you can decided when to totally go off the lozenges. When you are ready to go from three to two to one do it and by that time, your withdrawal should be minimal because there won't be much nicotine left in you system, but everyone is different and I am not a doctor, so I don't know.

      Mr. Billygoat and Loz-- thanks for sharing here andhang in-- you really can give the lozenges up and will feel so much better once you are off them and think of the money you'll save:-)

      hope I haven't missed anybody. Glad this hub and these comments are proving useful. I've now beenlozenge free for several years and really feel happier and healthier.

    • profile image

      sally 4 years ago

      thanks for your encouragement its day one of no nicotene gum I am chewing normal mint stuff which I hate but I guess Ill get used to it and knowing me Ill probably get addicted to that! I feel very flat and extremely moody and fed up does this sound like other peoples experiences and how long will it last? Ive bought quite a few treats in teh fridge so that Ive at least got nice things to eat and I plan to keep busy all weekend although I dont feel ready to see friends as I feel very very grumpy and flat in my mood. This site is really helping so thanks robie and everyone else who has commented Im looking forward to being richer. Luckily I dont think I had any side effects from the gum but I certainly could no longer afford it and hated being a slave to it ie always having to rush to the shops because I had run out etc it was definitely ruling my life and I would love to go and buy some now but Im not going to! Just feel very low but hoping these feelings will soon pass

      good luck to anyone else quitting - robie can I ask did you feel like this when you quit the lozenges (presume they are similar to gum but not sure) and how long til you felt happy/normal again?

      thanks so much

      Sally

    • profile image

      sally 4 years ago

      gosh its hard I feel really fed up and like I have nthing to look forward to!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Sally-- those are the withdrawal symptoms and I felt just like that. At the end I was doing 10 to 15, 2 mg lozenges a day-- sometimes more if I am honest. That's a lot of nicotine. I tapered off and didn't go cold turkey, but still had cravings and withdrawal symptoms.

      I'm thinking that walking and exercise will help you as will drinking lots of water. I would also say you might want to consider A2Laura 'ssuggestion made a couple of days ago( see her comment above) about using the patch to get off the lozenges if the cold turkey is more than you can take. The withdrawal is intense, but it doesn't last long. If you can tough it out, things should be better in a few days and the cravings get further and further apart.

    • profile image

      sally 4 years ago

      thanks so much Robie I cant believe how helpful you are being I ve nearly got through today but hoping tomorrow will be better! Great advice the withdrawal is horrid who would have thought nicotene gum could be such a problem have a great weekend do you ever crave a lozenge now? hwo long did it take to feel normal again?

    • profile image

      sally 4 years ago

      Im going to bed at 7 o'clock on a Friday night usually with my gum I love a glass of wine on a Friday and am in good spirits cos it s the end of the week tonight I feel very low and fe d up with life no energy and cant be bothered to even chat with my family gosh I hope these feelings pass as at the moment Im thinking of getting some gum tomorrow I dont want to feel like this forever. Hopefullly day 2 will be better as today has been pretty dreadful. Robie how long did your withdrawal symptoms last? THanks Sally

    • profile image

      Vetters 4 years ago

      Thank you so much for this post. Today is day one of giving up lozengers for me and stumbled upon this web site whilst trying to ascertain how long the cravings will last. I've given up cold turkey after using them for about 12 months. In that time I have had medical issues after medical issues including anemic, cavities, anxiety, thyroid issues-the list goes on. I would never start smoking again but I wish I had never started on lozengers. I have felt like hell all day today and luckily I'm off work until Friday.

    • profile image

      Aqua 4 years ago

      Robbie, your story is basically my story. I WANT TO GET OFF THESE STUPID LOZENGE!!. So, I'm starting now. Even though I still have half a tube in my purse, no more. My problems are gas, periodic depression, numbness of fingers and toes, which goes on forever, headache. All of these I never had before I started to be on lozenges! Even during 20 years of heavy smoking. I don't know,maybe these are all signs of aging we're all experiencing? ANd just thinking it's nicotine use problem? Thanks so much for your article, I also read all the comments! My friends, we can all beat it! Starting now!!!

    • profile image

      mel 4 years ago

      Thank you for the advice of writing down our intake, robie2. I've been addicted to lozenges for 5 years now. I have no clue how many I use a day but it may be 30-40. I suck about halfway through a lozenge then before I realize what I'm doing I will bite down and chew up the other half. (2 mg). I'm chewing these lozenges like potato chips all day at work. If I quit cold turkey I would lose my mind and my job. Like many of you I have stomach pain. Tomorrow I will start counting them and writing it down. I came online tonight looking for help for this addiction and I'm grateful I found this page. Gradually tapering and writing down the quantity sounds like a good working plan. Thank you!

    • profile image

      Marina 4 years ago

      Hello everybody, another addict ( hope to be ex-addict soon!) here!

      Day 2 of cold turkey after about 6 yrs of 2mg lozenges... boy it's hard! As i find it hard not to have something in my mouth, I'm constantly chewing caramel sweets or chocolate - hate mints! Tried fisherman's friends but don't particularly like the taste and they don't seem to agree with my stomach. I really miss the taste of them (niq original) If I succed I will fatten up, but I'll have to deal with that later - wish me luck :)

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      ooops--sorry-- have been away for a few days and haven't checked this comment thread. Good luck to all of you who are going cold turkey or weaning yourselves from the lozenges. And Marina-- there are all kinds of sugar free candies to suck on-- keep looking for something sugar free that yu like. I still suck on sugar free lifesavers now and then and used them extenisvely when coming off the lozenges.

      The first few days are rough, but it gets better fast. Stick with it everybody and good luck and thanks for posting your progress and tips for others here.

    • profile image

      Aqua 4 years ago

      Day 5 - no nicotine. I always chow or suck on something though. Already gained 3 pounds, but it's worth it! There are stretches of times when I don't even remember that I need nicotine..I like Breathsavers and ice-breakers - no sugar.. My breath sure smells nice nowdays)) Good luck everybody!! And Robie - thank you once more!

    • profile image

      mel 4 years ago

      I DID IT. I know I was going through at least 20-30 a day, if not 40. BUT, the first day I logged it down on paper I had 12. Second day I had 6. Third day I had 1 broken into tiny pieces spread throughout that day.

      For 3 days now I have had NO nicotine. Yes, I saw red and was super irritable but the simple act of writing it down just seem to rewire my way of thinking that I wanted to get off of them now! I was so tired of the expense. I am trying different sugar free mints, (I love icebreakers, too, Aqua) but none have nicotine. I am so happy! Thank you, robie2. You probably don't realize how helpful you are by having this site, but I really am grateful to you. Your tip helped me get off the nicotine lozenges after 5 years of using them.

    • profile image

      merrylegs 4 years ago

      Maybe we should change this to s quit nicotine forum? Anyway, didn't realise it is 14 months since I first posted on this thread. Tried the cutting down methof of getting off nicotine lozenges. Which worked fine in the office - but back home, I#d quickly ramp it up again.

      Anyway, I HAVE to stop this for financial reasons. I figure I use between 18 and 20+ lozenges a day. I use(d) the 1mg ones. I know they aren't easily available but they are where I live. I reckon my wee addiction costs me upwards of £140 a month!!!! Ridiculous. Just ridiculous even if I DID have the money.

      Anyway, last lozenge went into my mouth on Friday night. (I didn't think nic patches would work for me - just one more fix to then stop. and I want to be nicotine free.) I have been lozenge free for about 40 hours. Have been chewing gum and sucking mints like crazy. Yesterday was the utter pits. Today - not so bad. And I am keeping myself going with the mantra that all nicotine is out of your system after 72 hours. So am over half way there. I just keep reminding myself of how much this has cost me and what I can do with the money instead. But boy am I cranky! Will let you know how it goes. Do luck everybody. Be strong! x

    • profile image

      Marina 4 years ago

      Well, nearly 3 weeks off the nic... not too bad, if only my brain would stop telling me there's something missing... not a craving, just a fleeting "huh i should be chewing something now' and then it's gone. I have gained a few pounds already, with all the candies etc, and the fact that nicotine speeds your metabolism up. Never mind, I'll sort it after xmas :)

    • profile image

      merrylegs 4 years ago

      Hi again,

      3 weeks and 3 days nicotine free. And boy I have been finding it hard. Not all of the time - but usually when I was most conscious of popping a lozenge (or 2, 3, 4!!!) like right after dinner at night. Like Marina, am gaining weight. Just want to eat and chew a LOT. Am going to try and get that in hand a bit as was already carrying a few extra pounds. And middle-aged and hormonally challeneged into the bargain. Oh LOL. But hey - no NICOTINE!!!!!!!. You can do it folks. x

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Yayyyyyyy merrylegs You did it!!! Doesn't it feel good??? kudos and a big virtual gold star -- I feel almost as good for you as I did for me. The weight really will come off and the cravings do get further and further apart with time. I gained 15 lbs when I quit the lozenges and a year later went to weightwatchers and took it off-- and I might add kept it off. Not to worry-- the big thing is you are truly nicotine free.

    • profile image

      Donna Mead 4 years ago

      I think I need help!

      I quit and used lozenges but could not give up lozenges. The NHS smoking clinic told me there was nothing else they could do to help me.

      I now smoke and 2 months ago I started to miss the lozenges.

      I used lozenges and smoke!

      My mind is telling me this is ok because my smoking is halved or less and I save more money and lozenges are safer than smoking!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      I think you need help too-- and thanks for posting here. Sorry I didn't see it sooner. My advice is get all the cigs out of the house and all the lozenges as well. Pick a quit date( like day after tomorrow) and get everything out before zero hour, then slap on a nicotine patch to get you through the withdrawal-- Do NOT under any circumstances smoke a cigarette or suck on a lozenge while wearing the patch-- you could poison yourself...... keep going for at least three days and then switch down to the lower strength patch and use as long as necessary along with regular( not nicotine ) chewing gum and cough drops like Fisherman's friend. If you are motivated, this will work for you-- work yourlself down to the lowest level of patch taking as long as you need and then-- when ready-- no more patch, no cigs, no lozenges and if you chew gum or suck on cough drops who cares? You are nicotine free.

      Hope this helps and good luck

    • profile image

      DH 4 years ago

      25 days off the lozenges after being on them for 18 months after dipping Copenhagen for 25 years in the Army. I have crazy moments still but they are getting less severe, not lasting as long, not happening as often. It helps that I have started running again. Chew gum till it hurts and drink an extra cup of coffee or two.

      I thought the first 4 days would be hard, but in reality the first 14 days were. Reading the history on this thread gave me a weird kind of strength to quit. So thanks for that, and I hope you are all doing well.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Hi DH and congrats on those 25 days. The strength of both the mental and physical addiction varies from person to person and it sounds like yours was pretty strong-- it takes a long time to break all the psychological triggers and the cravings come and go but kudos to you for not giving in..... that is important. Come back and post here anytime-- this comment thread is kind of turning into an informal forum and has prompted me to do more research on the dynamics of quitting.... I'm finding quite a lot of useful info. In fact I'm working on an ebook about it..... I'll let you know when it's done

    • profile image

      Aqua 4 years ago

      Me again! 2 months of nicotine-free!! Yaaahhooooo!!! I'm addicted to IceBreakers "Frost" though - why do I have to have something in my mouth all the time?? Is it genetic? This oral fixation.. Anyway - Robie - thank you very much!! Your tread helped a lot, even though I was already ready to quit.. I'm feeling so much better. I gained about 5 lbs so far, but no worries, I'll take them off.. I'm a non-smoker!

    • profile image

      happyathome23 4 years ago

      Hi DH, Aqua, Robie and other posters: I took (chewed really) my last nicotine lozenge on Friday night. I have been using them on and off for about 4 years, since I quit smoking. I have tried to quit the lozenges before but was unsucessful because, well, I'm an addict and thats what addicts do. I am tired of having to use a substance to make myself feel better. My dentist keeps asking me about the little sores in my mouth and ridges on my teeth but I'm too embarassed to tell him about the lozenges. I'm sure my health is suffering from this addiction and I have two kids who need me to be present and healthy so I'm very committed to quitting. But I have to say, I feel like crap. I have no energy, no drive, I feel sad and kind of hopeless. Anyone else feel like this when you first gave up the nicotine lozenges? I appreciate any feedback from people who really understand. Thank you.

    • profile image

      Steven 4 years ago

      So I started smoking when I was 16 and am 25. In those 9 years I can say I smoked a pack of ciggs a day for at least 5 of them, I have quit 4 or 5 times and am going on a year right now. I use the 4mg lozenges and keep track of how many I use each day and have been around 20mg of nicotine per day for the entire year. Given a pack of smokes contain 20 cigarettes and the nicotine absorption from each is roughly 1mg it's painfully obvious that I just switched my nicotine addiction. I read a study that said cigarette addiction can be a double, and even triple edge sword. In addition to the thousand or so chemicals and countless carcinogens that come with smoking, not to mention the tar and the damage done to lung tissue just from inhaling smoke, burning tobacco also produces a MAOI like substance. MAOIs were some of the first antidepressants created and work by inhibiting the enzyme (mono-amine oxidase) that breaks down dopamine, serotonin, nor-epinephrine, etc... So when you smoke the nicotine increases dopamine (as well as other neurotransmitter) levels, the MAOI keeps these levels higher for longer, and if you smoke mentholated ciggs menthol increases the half-life of nicotine by about 2 times. I really wish I could find the study.

      The point is that while nicotine is very addictive and can cause problems, the use of NRT not only dramatically decreases the amount of tar, toxins, carcinogens one intakes, it should in theory be easier to stop when/if the time comes since there are no extra "drugs" that increase addictiveness like in cigarette smoke.

    • profile image

      Marina 4 years ago

      Well I'm still off the lozenges, 2 months now, but i think the cravings are psychological, not physical. Like Aqua said, have to have something in my mouth all the time! However, I'm sure Werther's Originals sugar-free (my replacement drug of choice) are not as bad for you as nicotine :)))

    • profile image

      Helen032 4 years ago

      I have been using nicotine lozenges for about 10 years and am so sick of them. My teeth feel on edge the whole time and I can feel problems in my stomach. As a recovering alcoholic I am very aware of the denial of addiction. I have been telling myself that there's no harm in using NRT aids, despite evidence to the contrary becoming available. Mostly on the web. It's been 19 hours since my last fix. I am disorientated, feel empty and my mind is telling me there's no harm in having the odd one. That's the problem, it won't stop at the odd one, and will be up to 18 pieces a day within a day or two. It's the first one that does the damage.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Hang in Helen-- you did it with booze, you can do it with lozenges. Just take it one minute at a time if necessary. It is the same process..... resist the cravings . For what it is worth, cravings for nicotine don't last more than ten minutes usually-- just ride the wave. I used to set a timer. The first three days are the worst and then you have to deal with the psychological triggers-- but I'm getting ahead of myself. Please let us all know how you are doing.We're pulling for you.

    • profile image

      Helen032 4 years ago

      Thanks Robbie. Getting better each day, the withdrawal was much worse than I remember from previous attempts, but manageable because, as you point out, cravings don't last much longer than 10 mins. Having this forum really helps.

    • profile image

      DH 4 years ago

      6 weeks. I go days without thinking about them.

      Still comes up from time to time... but I'm pretty hopeful. The first two weeks were insanely hard. Got nothing done at work. Snapped on people. Worth it.

      Actually running again which helps immensely.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Congrats DH and thanks for sharing your progress here-- it really helps others to know it can be done.

    • profile image

      Joe3033 4 years ago

      I stopped chewing in February 2006 and started with the lozenges. Talk about bad, 24 per day for the past 6 years (averaging $65/week). I stopped Christmas Day. Still doing good so far!

    • profile image

      DH 4 years ago

      Dude (Joe) I feel your pain.

      8 weeks down. Have had a few bad moments, but it really is getting noticeably better. I am absolutely over the physical addiction, but from time to time I really feel like I need something to get through the day. It's crazy.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Hey Dude- keep up the good work-- You are almost free. Happy New Year and thanks for coming back to share your success here:-)

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Hello Joe3033-- and an especially Merry Christmas to you. Keep up the good work. You won't be sorry. The first week or so is tough but it should get much easier fast as long as you resist the urge. Keep up all posted:-) oh and Happy New Year.....

    • profile image

      MsNavalCPO 4 years ago

      I am not a smoker.. nor have I ever used a form of nicotine replacement so maybe what I have to say will mean nothing... but for me, my husband's addiction has hurt me in ways that most don't think about. There are certain things that I have wanted for years... things that are too expensive for us to purchase on a whim... or so I thought. Tonight, I found another receipt for the nicorette lozenges and tonight, i am hurt and angry. One thing I have wanted for about three years now costs just under $200. The lozenges, $31. I am angry because he can spend the money on his addiction with not one thought to the thing I have longed to have for so long. He can spend that $31 over and over without a thought but much thought goes into the monetary reason for not getting me what I desire. It sucks... I am a victim of his addiction. Did I say that I was angry already? ugh!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      MsNavalCPO. Thanks for adding your voice here. It always helps to hear how addiction impacts others..... the only thing I can say is that it is pointless to be angry or to feel victimized over what he does because all you will do is make yourself miserable and trust me, he is not going to magically stop sucking on lozenges to buy you whatever it is you want...... Take action instead-- take money out of the food budget or get a part time job or just tell him to find a way to buy you what you want. There are lots of ways for you to get your needs met, but waiting around for Prince Charming is definitely not one of them:-)

      At least he is not still smoking cigarettes--even buying them with a military discount, they are more expensive than the lozenges and smoke not only has more than 100 carcinogens in it, it smells yukky and makes the whole house stink too-- at least sucking on the lozenges has some advantages over cigs.

      Thanks for reading and commenting and adding your voice here.

    • profile image

      marina 4 years ago

      Rats! I'm fed up & thinking of going onto lozenges again. The amount of weight i've put on in just 3 months is unbelievable and I can't shift it - need nicotine again to speed up metabolism!!!! Oh well, I tried.....

    • profile image

      pm 4 years ago

      Glad I found this site. I too quit smoking but got trapped on lozenge. Stomach problems gas. Cutting down now.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      nooo noooo marina-- don't do it. In another three months you will be able to lose it. This is the weight not only from the lozenges, but from when you quit cigarettes too. I know it feels awful I gained 50 lbs the first time I quit cigs-- I was off them for four years, lost most of the weight and then went back during a life crisis and a year and a half later quit again with the help of lozenges. I sucked on the lozenges for about seven years. When I gave up the lozenges I put on 15 lbs pronto when I quit the lozenges, after a couple of years off the lozenges I went to weightwatchers and lost 17 lbs. Here, read my tips on avoiding weight gain ( learned the hard way I assure you) https://hubpages.com/health/Tips-To-Help-You-Avoid... and don't give in too soon

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      hi PM-- glad you found us too-- good luck. You won't be sorry you quit

    • profile image

      Eva 4 years ago

      Wow! I thought I was unique. I've been addicted to the lozenges for 5 years now. No one knows; well hubby takes the Micky but I bite his head off! I stopped for 18 months when I was pregnant and nursing, but started again when life as a working mum became stressful. Am kind of scared to quit as scared if the great stress returning. I constantly have a lozenge in my mouth. I don't crave cigarettes at all, but get het up when my lozenge pack is running out and I'm not sure when I get some more!

      Thank you so much for this post- makes me feel a little less alone and "weird"

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

      haha-- you are not weird at all, Eva-- nicotine is very addictive, whatever the form you take it in. The lozenges are not as bad for you as cigarette smoke is so that is one good thing and quitting them is a personal choice, not a moral question LOL I mean don't be so hard on yourself. You will quit when you feel you need to. Until then relax-- sucking on nicotine lozenges doesn't make you a bad person, it just makes you addicted to nicotine like the rest of us:-) Thanks for stopping by and sharing your experiences here.

    • profile image

      Nas64 4 years ago

      I was addicted to the lozenges for over 4 years but I was able to quit smoking. Did a lot of research to find how to quit the lozenges...not much info out there. I did read to use L-tyrosine 2 weeks before trying to quit smoking. I have been using the L-tyrosine and have been nicotine free for five days now with very little anxiety or irritability. Hope this helps someone. Take 2 500 mg capsules in the morning and another 2 in the evening. Never thought I could do it!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 3 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Thanks for adding that very interesting tip, Nas64. And congrats on being nicotine free-- a great feeling, isn't it?

    • profile image

      Nas64 3 years ago

      Your welcome...I am hoping it might help someone else. Thanks! Yesterday was 2 weeks...it is a great feeling especially not having to spend all that money every week!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 3 years ago from Central New Jersey

      haha-- the money part is just the best, isn't it? Congrats again and I too hope this hub and all these comments help others to stop the lozenges.

    • profile image

      DH 3 years ago

      6 months. A few days ago actually. Had not even thought about it. It can be done.

    • profile image

      Matthew 3 years ago

      Today is the day that I have decided to quit these little white pods of addiction. I've been writing an essay for most of the day and popping them in my mouth the whole time. I've even started chewing them.

      It's been about four years since I bought my first pack and I'm honestly sick of the constant need for them. It's heartening to see that so many people are in the same boat (as bad as that sounds).

      Definitely toxic, definitely addictive. Defiantly I'll beat them.

      ....after this packet has gone.

    • profile image

      sSteve 3 years ago

      After reading this i stopped using the losenges.... Its been 4 days and i used fishermans friends ...... They really did help as i liked the burning sensation on my gums...... Thanks for the advice and good luck to all

    • profile image

      Matt R. 3 years ago

      I smoked for 11 years and kept trying to quit cold turkey, because everyone I talked to said that NRTs are counter-productive. I kept relapsing over and over and finally my doctor said, "Ok, so is what you're doing working?" My doctor suggested I give the lozenges a try. Admittedly, I used the max suggested amount for the first day or two, but then I regulated how much I used. gradually weaning myself off them until I was only using one lozenge a day. By this point, withdrawal was easy and relatively painless and I was finally able to come free of it. Look at all the prescription medications people are on and the various side effects of these medications... I guess it just depends on what's worse: having depression or dealing with sudden bowel release or whatever the side effect is. With medications like Paxil, or OTC medications like nicotine lozenges, they treat a symptom, not a cause. Any medication without behavioral modification training is just another addiction.

    • profile image

      aseffa 3 years ago

      I'm addicted to the nicotine lozenge. just started tapering.

    • profile image

      aseffa desta 3 years ago

      does anyone know how long nicotinen lozenge withdrawal will last when tapering off of them?

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 3 years ago from Central New Jersey

      aseffa-- I think the withdrawal varies from person to person. It isn't as bad as going off cigarettes, but it is significant. The tapering helps. I remember at first having one in the morning, one after every meal and one at night for about three days and then taking one more away every couple of days. I think it took about a week to get down to one or two and the last one or two were the hardest to give up...... but I did because by that time I was sucking on peppermint lifesavers like crazy. The day I went without one for 24 hours was a red letter day and from there it just got easier ( although I was sucking on a lot of peppermit lifesavers for a few weeks) Good luck

    • profile image

      Aseffa 3 years ago

      do you know if someone can cut a 4mg in half to make it a 2mg? Than use the 2mg than cut the 2mg in half than stop

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 3 years ago from Central New Jersey

      I don't know, Aseffa, but it would seem to me that you could give it a try. In theory it should work as a tapering tool and I can't see how it could hurt. I'd be interested in knowing how it works out for you

    • profile image

      Valerie 3 years ago

      Hi, Robie... Thank you so much for this hub! I started my love affair with cherry lozenges in 2007. Since then, I've switched back and forth between lozenges, the patch, gum, the inhaler, cigars, back to cigarettes at one point, and various combinations of these, but haven't been completely nicotine-free. It's oral NRT that was my favorite. I'd actually come to prefer the stinging hit of a lozenge to a cigarette. I wasn't fooling myself - I knew I'd replaced one addiction with another, and although I know it's better (certainly cheaper) than smoking, I was tired of being chained to them.

      I tried tapering. I tried cutting them in half with a pill splitter. I couldn't do it. (I could never taper off of cigarettes, either.)

      I'd tried regular gum, candies, cough drops, nothing helped, even cherry flavored candy. I tried using those with a 21 mg patch on, but I still couldn't do it. Then I realized that it was the strong tingling feeling I was missing. That was the biggest thing for me! So, during a bad craving I asked my DH to get me some cinnamon candy. And it worked for me! Dentyne, Trident cinnamon gum. Use it like the nicotine gum. Chew, chew park and it gives the tingling sensation I'm used to. And Brach's makes a hard cinnamon medallion candy that is a good replacement to the lozenge. I find that ginger gum or ginger altoids provide a similar effect, too, but I like the cinnamon. After a brief stint on 21 patches and then on 14, I'm about to step down to 7. Without the cinnamon and patch combo, I doubt I'd be able to do this without going completely nutso.

      Good luck, everyone, on kicking NRT. Like many others, I found the lozenge addiction extremely difficult to give up. (Strangely enough, not so at all with the patch. No problems tapering off of that so far.) We can do this!

    • profile image

      Mandi 3 years ago

      Hi remember me? I first wrote on here about 20 months ago. I was addicted to the nicotine lozenges! After reading this blog I got soooo angry with myself and the lozenges that I went cold turkey. Well I just thought I'd up date you. I'm still off them. I am still sucking on sugar free mints from aldi. I heard it said though that the sugar substitute 'Aspartame' is bad for your health...... There may be another blog out there about that! I digress! Sorry. What I wanted to share with you is the fact that after all this time it's very VERY rare that I think about smoking. In fact I can honestly say I'm not interested in cigarettes at all now. When ever I see the adverts on tv about nicotine lozenges though I thank god that I got off them. I was a slave to them for years. They cost me a fortune over the years and I paid with my health as well as with money! I weaned myself off by using the smallest dosage ( I felt I sucked more though) after a few months I used to snap the lozenges in half and duck half at a time. I did that for about 18 months. That's when I found this blog. The panic I felt when I thought I was going to run out I wouldn't wish on anyone. Good luck everyone. There IS light at the end of the tunnel.

    • profile image

      Peter King 3 years ago

      Have been addicted to these for years on and off. The recent price hike has really ,made me think. Got a friend who in her 30's was a serious heavy drinker, sadly now 41 she has been diagnosed with bowel cancer.... Makes you realise how short life is. Hence wanting to get off these legal drugs now I have been off the alcohol for a month. So this should be easy too.

    • profile image

      nyc 3 years ago

      Hi all... I was on the lozenges (7+ years) recently quit them cold turkey... Up to 10 days now..

      I started reading these blogs as I was feeling a high level of anxiety on day 1 and wanted some reassurance that the symptoms would pass and I could do it.

      So in the hope of helping others quit these extremely evil little follies...I wanted to briefly share and reassure that quitting really isn't that hard.

      Day 1 2 and 3 were difficult. The symptoms are mainly anxiety, strangely empty stomach and quite depressed. Day 1 was absolutely the worst but these symptoms deteriorate and go by day 5.

      The annoying symptom that replaces anxiety/depression is a horrible constant metallic taste in your mouth... probably withdrawal from having something constantly in your mouth..

      Tums have helped this problem however... and now day 10 ... still have that taste (much lesser extent) feeling quite hungry... but my skin has cleared up immensely and I am feeling myself...

      These nicotine products are evil and I'm sure the FDA etc just don't know the long term effects.... rest assured quitting is not that hard!!! These expensive little pills are probably causing long term damage!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 3 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Thanks so much nyc for sharing your experience here and I totally agree with your assessment though I have no professional qualifications other than as an ex smoker and ex nicotine lozenge addict. I am so grateful to be unhooked from nicotine in all forms. I certainly needed the lozenges to quit, but I also abused them for years and Lord only knows what the long term effects on teeth and gastro intestinal tract are.... Kudos to you for getting it done and for letting others know about it. You are the best!!!!! It also gives me real pleasure to know that this hub and the comments here helped you.

    • profile image

      Cath 3 years ago

      I m also addicted to the lozenges....have many of the side effect...Bad stomach, eye sight gettting bad, memory loss and fogginess...All symptoms of aspartame...The artificial sweetener used in the Habitrol lozenges I use...Interestingly monsanto owns the company that makes aspartame...They also own one of the big phamacy companies...Feeling like a guinea pig...Pretty clever keep us hooked on nicotine, get us sick with aspartame, attempt to fix us with chemicals...Trillion dollar business all up...

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 3 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Hi Cath-- all I can say is that you really can get unhooked and I hope you choose to give it a try. There are lots of tips in this comments thread along with lots of encouragement from people who have done it. We are all cheering you on so go for it:-)

    • profile image

      Cath 3 years ago

      Hi Robbie, thanks for that. Have currently replaced the lozenges with the patches...Need to get a huge workload out of way before attempting to give up the patches. Looking at taking a few weeks off work to focus on giving up on the patches...Cant wait!! :) I spent 30 years living on coffee and cigarettes, this new journey is so exciting, and just getting better by the day. Blessings

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 3 years ago from Central New Jersey

      That is wonderful..... I'm pulling for you. A word of warning though.... if you get a craving ride it through, do not, under any circumstances, start popping lozenges mindlessly into your mouth while wearing the patch. Double trouble dontchaknow :-) That said...... stock up on Fisherman's Friend, or peppermints or whatever and go for it!!!!!!!

    • profile image

      J-Le 3 years ago

      Hi everyone, I have popped back to let you all know that I have been off the Lozenges for 6 weeks now :-) When I last came on here I was so desperate to quit but just couldn't seem to do it.

      Anyway I tried the fishermens friends and they seemed to help cut down but still I couldn't give the Nic quits up. I cut down to 1mg in mint ( best deal BTW was Boots own!) and then after getting used to the mint flavour it was easy to replace them with polo's ! I sucked as many as I wanted for 2 weeks and then gave them up too which was so easy. I know that they are bad for your teeth so as long as this doesn't replace the other habit long term then they were fine short term. The sugar free polos can give you laxative symptoms if too many are consumed.

      Good luck everyone x

    • profile image

      Louise 3 years ago

      Great post and so good not to feel so alone with this. 4 years of lozenge addiction I have really had enough, I'm gonna go for it and get some fisher mans friends. Fingers crossed!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 3 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Goog luck, Louise...... it really can be done... if you gave up cigarettes you can give up the nicotine lozenges. If I can do it, anybody can. Thanks for stopping by and commenting. Would love to know how it goes. Hope you'll let us all know.

    • profile image

      Mary 3 years ago

      I'm afraid if I don't have the lozenge with me I'll go right back to smoking. It' been 7 months without a cigarette for me. I've also gained 25 lbs. Help me some-one.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 3 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Hi Mary- don't go off the lozenges cold turkey and congratulations on your seven months without a cigarette. If you want to try something, just keep a journal of how many lozenges you consume in a day.... write down every one you take, but don't even think about stopping yet. Don't worry about the weight either. It will come off eventually. There are good reasons why we all gain weight when we quit. It has to do with a changing metabolism. There is lots of info about this online. I wrote a hub on the subject. You can check it out here on Hubpages. What is most important is that you are not smoking cigarettes. A lozenge addiction will be easier to kick that cigarettes. Above all don't go back to smoking. If you just keep track of the lozenges you use, you will find out how many you use in a typical day, will discover your pattern, and will know when you are ready to cut back. Don't even try before you know you are ready.

    • profile image

      Muse 3 years ago

      Wow, I really thought I was alone in my lozenge addiction. I'm sorry to see so many people struggling. This article made me take off the rose-colored glasses so to speak. I will begin the recording and tapering process tomorrow morning. Thank tou for writing this, and thank you to all the commenters; each comment informed and inspired me. Best of luck to all!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 3 years ago from Central New Jersey

      and best of luck to you too, Muse. Thank you for leaving a comment. You can do it, I am sure and you will be so happy when it is done. Let us know how you are doing.

    • profile image

      2 years ago

      I smoked for ten years, but easily quit with the lozenges. I've been addicted to the lozenges for over seven years. I don't over use them at all, but my stomach upset is getting worse and worse. I have no other side effects that I know of. I use 1-2 lozenges a day, biting off tic-tac size pieces here and there. The stomach upset will go away as my body craves nicotine, but as soon as the lozenge hits my stomach, the pain or gas starts. Sometimes, like tonight, the pain and bloat turns into a nausea that lasts all night. I'm quitting cold turkey now. Good luck everyone!

    • profile image

      alvev 2 years ago

      There's no growing evidence of cancer from lozenges. I searched for the evidence in peer-reviewed journals and the last one I found was from 2009 and it was about nicotine gum, not lozenges.

      Aspartame doesn't cause cancer. However, if you suck on candy with sugar you'll damage your teeth.

      The gas you get from the lozenges is cured by taking a probiotic.

    • profile image

      Sharon Mc 2 years ago from North Central Ohio

      Thank you Robie 2 and everyone! I found this while suffering a terrble tooth ache grom the decay the losenges caused. I am on my 6th tube of Oragel and my 2nd dentist for repairs.

      I use 1 1/2-2 boxes of 2mg cherry flavored a week of a major department store brand (108 in each box).

      I am 55 yoa & have COPD (emphysema) on 2ml oxygen 24/7. I smoked for 31 years, plus 2nd hand smoke from both parents. I've tried hipnosis, patches, gum, citrus drinks, cold turkey and nothing was succesful except the losenges. Now 5 years later here I am with a mouth full of rotten teeth and a host of other health issues (unexplained galbladder/upper right quadrant pain, fibromyalgia, tinnitus), not to mention an expensive habbit.

      I started my chart last night (notebook on android) and I went all night without one and a half an hour after waking up. I said some prayers before starting this journey and being one without much self control this is my shot.

      Just a note regarding a comment I think you may have overlooked back 2 years ago. A woman named Dawn, has a twin has lost her feet because the bones died and she had no success with cadaver bones. No medical explanation why. I am going to look over everything again to make sure I didn't miss an update from her. I am sorry this cure has been a necessary evil for her. I shall remember them both I my prayers.

      Thanks again.

    • profile image

      Sharon Mc 2 years ago from North Central Ohio

      Also inquiring to Alvev, please share where we ca find that information and/or who did them. Thanks.

    • profile image

      Nicotine addict 2 years ago

      I too started smoking menthol cigarettes daily at 14. When I crept to two packets a day, I tried nicorette lozenges and gum. I am now an addict and still smoke 15-20 cigarettes a day. But if I don't have my 4mg lozenges, I smoke up to four packets. I got more hooked trying to stop.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 2 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Thank you G, Alvev, Horsewoman and Nicotine addict for adding so much information and keeping the conversation going. Since writing this Hub I have been awed by the power of nicotine as an addictive substance and by the number of health issues the gum and lozenges can cause. Thanks to all for sharing your personal nicotine struggles, especially with the gum and lozenges here. I think it is helping some people to read about the struggles of others.

    • profile image

      joe 2 years ago

      I used to be a very heavy smoker and had it not been for lozenges I never would have been able to quit. Gum and patches did not work for me. I haven't smoked in 7 years and I thank God for that every day. For anyone who is trying to quit, I highly recommend them . They work. If later you have trouble getting off the lozenges, wear a patch for a week and suck on sugarless candy, tic tacs and gum. I havent had an ill effects from the lozenges but did trade one addiction for another for a long time. It was worth it to me. If I hadn't quit smoking, I'd be dead soon, if not by now. Please do not be afraid to use the lozenges, They work when nothing else will

    • profile image

      merrylegs 2 years ago

      Here I am again - posted 2 years ago after 5 years cig free but with a HUGE addiction to NRT lozenges AND sugar-free gum. What is THAt about? Is it lack of self-belief? Stopped both cold-turkey. I can't do reduction. If I have something to hand I will take it/use it. Did pretty well for a while - the money saved on gum alone was quite substantial. Did a healthy eating plan at the same time. Then found myself putting on weight anyway. Cut back even more on the calories - then realised the calories in Fisherman's friends (which I used to get off the nicotine and as is my way, kept increasing). Got fed up with myself and was going through a pretty tough time as well. So went back on the nicotine 1mg lozenges. Sad?! Lost a few pounds and felt back in control and got back off the lozenges - again cold turkey. Still using F/friends and sugar free polos. (Will NEVER use gum again - was ill on that). Am trying to keep it all under control remembering calories. And to keep moving.

      Bottom line is though - I have now had to have several teeth pulled and all round the areas where I used to park those nicotine lozenges. And I can't afford implants so am watching my face age what feels like too fast to me and feel quite rubbish about that. Sometimes feels like a LOT of effort over the years for not much reward!!!!!

      M

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 2 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Hi Merrilegs.... great to hear from you again and thanks for reporting back and sharing the details with us here. It certainly helps me remember just how strong the hold of nicotine can be. I identify with your struggle and am pulling for you. Kudos to you for getting the nicotine totally out of your system in all forms. Who knows what your health would be like if you were still smoking cigarettes, or what your teeth would be like if you were still using lozenges.... For what it is worth I have three dental implants and numerous crowns and caps all acquired during the time I was on the lozenges or smoking cigarettes..... no new major dental problems in the last few years since I got off the gum and lozenges, so there is hope. Wish I could stop the aging process, and if you figure out a way, let me know :-) ( just kidding) I know it sucks, I really do. Nicotine does speed up the metabolism. I wrote a hub explaining why you gain weight when you quit smoking. There is a link to it above, at the end of this hub. You might want to go look at it. It explains the mechanism and what you can do ( which is basically what you are doing) but it is also true that your body will probably even out eventually, especially if you watch what you eat and keep moving. In the meantime keep in mind how much better your skin looks, how much better your hair smells and use all the money you are saving to buy yourself some beauty. You may not have money for dental implants, but you can get a haircut or some new. well fitting underwear, or some new make up or perfume......you've put in a lot of effort,and it really is paying off, even if it doesn't seem so sometimes... and you have been a wonderful voice here on this hub, for which I really really thank you.

    • profile image

      Brian 2 years ago

      Just thought I'd let people know how I quit smoking.... I smoked as much as I could the night before and then went to sleep. The next day I used the tic-tac-sized nico pills and been hooked every since (7 years on the pills). Stop smoking! Wooo Hooo! Now addicted to the pill :-(

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 2 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Great you are off cigarettes, Brian..... hope you will want to get off the nico pills eventually and be totally nicotine free.... but I say it takes what it takes to get off cigarettes and Kudos to you for doing it. When you are ready, the nico pills will go as well, I am sure. Good luck and thanks for sharing your experience here,

    • profile image

      Bob 8020 2 years ago

      Nicotine gum for 20 years. Trying to come off with nicotine patch. Any experience using this technique of graded reduction to cessation?

    • profile image

      Sharon Mc 2 years ago from North Central Ohio

      This is my 3rd day on step 2 patches. After 35 yrs smoking menthols (long brown cigs) and 5 years of losenges. I still want to scream! I did have a quarter of a piece between patches the first 2 days. I want one so bad right now! I have eaten all of my snacks and need a trip to the store. I just have to go to one that doesn't sell losenges. My teeth feel better. Like Helen032, I'm a recovering alcoholic and that first one is the engine not the caboose! But Aaarrggghhhh! and The Serenity Prayer again...Thanks everyone and good luck!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 2 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Hang in Horsewoman... and outwait the cravings if you can. I know they can be intense, but they rarely last more than ten minutes. I used to tell myself, I can put this off for half an hour and if I still want one then I can have it.... I did the half hour by half hour thing for cigarettes ( and, like you, many years ago for booze) and I found it worked for lozenges too. You are doing great. Your teeth, stomach, and brain are going to thank you when this is over ( and it will end, I promise). The cravings will get farther and farther apart and you will get better and better at waiting them out. Just wait and see :-)

    • profile image

      Trevor 2 years ago

      Thankyou for this forum. I have been on 12 x 4 mg lozenges a day for the past nine years. Addicted to them every bit as much as cigarettes, even though the amount of nicotine is much lower than when I was smoking. For the past six weeks I have been off lozenges, but finding it hard, though I think the cravings are getting less. Fisherman's Friends are supposed to be helping and I think they are, but I don't want to get addicted to them! How long do the cravings usually last after lozenges?Thanks again

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 2 years ago from Central New Jersey

      HI Trevor-- hang in... you are almost home. The cravings should be getting further and further apart by now, but often when they come they are very strong... kind of like there are fewer of them but the ones you get seem stronger... notice I say " seem" ..... this is the nicotine leaving your system and it will take another few weeks for it to be entirely gone. It is different for every person, but eventually the cravings do stop if you hang in there. Keep sucking on the Fishermans Friends if theyhelp. They don't have nicotine in them and it is the nicotine withdrawal that is giving you the cravings...... substitute with Fisherman's friends, or strong mints, or gum, or raw carrots or whatever helps. Just do not give in and have even one lozenge..... BTW you cannot get addicted to Fishermans Friend cough drops.... they don't have nicotine or any other addictive substance in them..... you can get used to using them as a nicotine substitute, but true addiction..... nah, not possible. First things first. Use them to unload the lozenges and then worry about unloading Fishermans Friend..... thanks for sharing your ezperience here and good luck

    • profile image

      Donna M 2 years ago

      Oh wow! People so understand! I have been hooked on nicotene gum for 15 years and I am so over it. The only time I'm not chewing is when I am asleep :-( I thought if was wonderful in the beginning, but nicotene is nicotene no matter how you take it. I have tried to stop more times than I can remember, it's really getting me down.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 2 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Totally get it, Donna and hope this hub and the comments will help you quit if that is what you want to do... It takes some concentration, but it can be done. I used the taper method I describe in the hub and many people have documented their "gum and lozenge journeys" in the comments on this hub...... Good luck and do keep checking in.

    • profile image

      Donna M 2 years ago

      Thank you :-) I feel more positive having others who understand. I don't think slowly reducing the gum will work with me, I've done that only to build it up again. I think I will try using patches and reduce them as has been suggested before. I just want to get right away from the whole chewing thing. After reading people's experiences on here last night I did not have another piece of gum. I have 10 pieces left so will keep one until I can get some patches and throw the rest away. I feel excited, I really want to be free of this lousy addiction! So grateful for this hub. Ps. I'm from down under in Sydney Australia :-)

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 2 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Hi Donna-- good for you. Sounds like a plan and I for one am sending good vibes down under to you.... slap that patch on and suck on breath mints of life savers or eat popcorn or whatever..... you will soon be totally, blessedly nicotine free.... yayyyyy... keep us posted ...

    • profile image

      Donna Oz 2 years ago

      Hi,

      Well! I am now 1 day and 13 hours nicotine free! Woo hoo! I didn't end up getting the patches, I finished off the gum, having the last piece Friday night. I found a free 'quit smoking' app on my phone which has helped immensely, it counts the hours, prompts me to stick with it and even has a little game which helps distract me through the craving. I also bought some fisherman friend lollies as recommended on here by others. I am choosing to stay right away from normal gum as I think the chewing thing was part of my addiction. Today I was motivated enough to do a coastal walk which was wonderful. I have to say that I felt very anxious on Friday night at the prospect of letting nicotine go. I needn't have been so worried, I am not alone. Thank you to every single person who has put something on here- I have read them all. They have inspired me to do this and keep going no matter what.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 2 years ago from Central New Jersey

      yAYYYYYYY Donna. I hope you can hear me clapping and shouting for you all the way down there in Oz :-) Thank you so much for sharing your process here. I think it really helps others and I know that I find it gratifying. I had no idea when I wrote this hub how many people were in the same boat with me. It has been a real eye opener.

    • profile image

      Ben 2 years ago

      Yup, those mints can get you. I realized I was hooked on them and just started smoking again to stop the mints. I bought the mini ones (the normal ones are gross) Trying again with patch....

      I use to work in a machine shop where everyone but two people smoked. Since the boss smoked (and a lot too) taking a CIG break every 45 minutes was cool. Now that I'm back in school should be easier.

      My car just got hailed on and I'm paying extra to just get the whole car painted nice so I can't afford to smoke.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 2 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Good luck Ben and thanks for stopping by and sharing your lozenge experience.....stick with the patch is my advice LOL

    • profile image

      Trevor 2 years ago

      Hiya Robie, you were right, the cravings do get less after a while. I suppose that when you consider that this is the first time I have been completely free from nicotine in more than thirty years, it is perfectly understandable that there would be a dramatic reaction to this sudden change. I think it would be very strange if there was not. However, that doesn't make the change easy to cope with! I suppose that it will continue to get easier as time passes, at least I hope so. Donna, I don't know if this is any help, but I have got right off Fisherman's Friends and everything else now, not that I was addicted to them, but because I wanted to stop replacing the lozenges with anything at all. By the way, I am also in Australia (Vic). Thanks again Robie; I will keep reading your hub, and will keep you posted as to how it's going. Good luck to everyone else too. Thankyou

    • profile image

      steve 2 years ago

      I was addicted for three or four years to nicotine gum. I was chewing up to 12 pieces of 4mg gum a day. I tried cutting down but just couldn't do it. I went to my doctor and was given champix. It made me so sick. I didn't think I could go through with it. It is not a pleasant way to stop chewing gum- it's HELL. After the first week the gum tasted vile. I dropped back to 2mg gum. After the third week I was chewing normal non-nicotine gum and just a couple of 2mg gum a day. Then it just seemed to stop. I'm not going through with the 12 week plan on champix. I've been off the nicotine gum four days and off the pills two. It might be an option for those who've been chewing nicotine gum for years. It won't be pleasant, but it worked for me. Good luck!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 2 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Hey Trevor.... sorry I've been away, but what I nice surprise to find your post. Thanks for sharing your success and congratulations.

      and thanks to you too Steve for stopping by and taking the tie to share your nicotine story. Do you mean Chantix rather than Campix? I think that Chantix is the stop smoking drug and I've known a couple of people who used it successfully to quit smoking and a couple of more who got severe depression from it and for whom it didn't work. Glad to hear that it worked for you and helped you get off the lozenges ( whether is is Chantix or Champix or whatever :-)) It doesn't sound pleasant, but at least it did the job and you are now nicotine free YAYYYY

    • junecampbell profile image

      June Campbell 2 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      Yes, I was addicted to Nicotine Gum back when I quit smoking. This was in the mid eighties, and at that time, where I lived, you needed a doctor's prescription for nicotine gum. I managed to get the prescription for about two years. After that, I tapered off to chewing regular gum, and I chewed regular gum as my substitute for years and years. I gave up the gum at the time that I had some teeth removed and began using a partial plate. Gum sticks to the partial denture, and I didn't like the no stick gum, so finally, I was free, totally free, of the cigarette habit and its gum chewing aftermath.

    • profile image

      John K 2 years ago

      Nicotine lozenges helped me to quit my smoking habit but I have been on the lozenges for over five years. I am 78 years old and in good health and the only reason I see for quitting the lozenges is the cost. I would welcome any advice because I really would like to get off them.

    • profile image

      Elizabeth C. 19 months ago

      I've addicted to nicotine lozenges for at least five years. Mouth is constantly busy with lozenge. I wonder if the injestion of lozenges cause gall bladder issues.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 19 months ago from Central New Jersey

      Hi Elizabeth--good for you and don't give up, but I hope you will try to unhook from the lozenges. It is easier than giving up the cigarettes, but still not exactly a walk in the park... don't know about gall bladder issues. I suspect not much research has been done, but you might post a question on one of the patient forums... here's a link. http://www.askapatient.com/viewrating.asp?drug=186... and, of course, ask your doctor about it. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

    • profile image

      Fores1gh7 16 months ago

      I've been really enjoying reading the comments here. I smoked, chewed tobacco or dipped snuff on and off for about a decade, and then in 2010 I stopped entirely for about 3 and a half years.

      I was honestly totally separated from tobacco, with essentially no cravings, but traveling alone on a long road trip one hot summer day, I got the idiotic idea in my brain to buy some chewing tobacco. And man, how it burned my gums after years of non-use.

      After four months of constant chewing (still no smoking, however, for all of these years), I've decided that it was a terrible habit to pick back up, and I just completed my 3-month-supply of 2mg lozenges yesterday.

      I was sooooo close to resupplying my next 3 month supply when I started reading about the lozenges online.

      And I must say, I didn't particularly feel addicted to the lozenges, but I did indeed look forward to ingesting them. I would normally have anywhere from around 3 to 8 daily (typically more if I'd been drinking).

      I have been totally without them today, and so far I feel fine...but I feel in the next few days I'm going to start the withdrawal process.

      BUT, this page prompted me to create an account and share my experience and to say thanks for the board, as it has totally confirmed my decision to not buy another supply of lozenges.

      I'll be back and forth to read other poster's comments, and hopefully share support of others. I'm also going to buy some mints like the mentioned Fisherman's Friends to help me suppress the lack of lozenges.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 16 months ago from Central New Jersey

      Good luck Fores1gh7. I totally relate. I gave up smoking once for four years and thought I would just have a couple of cigarettes to get me through a really tough time HA.... was back up to two packs a day within a year and a half. Had to start all over again. Don't know what possessed me, but it seemed like a good idea at the time :-) Here's wishing you a swift and easy passage back to tobaccoless living with a minimal withdrawal. Hope you will come back and share your experience here. Thanks for sharing your particular journey here.... I am sure I am not the only one who relates.

    • profile image

      Lozenge User 14 months ago

      I'm still struggling to get off the lozenges despite everything --- HUGE dental expenses (could have bought a nice car ... new!) by using sugarless candy and gums, holding/puffing fake cigarettes and so on. Nothing is working. I feel like a hard drug addict, the craving is THAT bad. I'm depressed and detest myself and my predicament. I think we need a class action lawsuit TO HIT THE MEDIA to enlighten the public.

    • profile image

      P.S. to above comments 14 months ago

      I wanted to add this: I was sent to a pulmonary specialist by my GP because of thirty years of smoking. The doc said I have extremely mild COPD and it hasn't progressed in three years. He also said if I hadn't stopped smoking when I did (15 years ago) my lungs would be in much worse shape. So, money spent on lozenges, extreme expense to fix teeth, (not to mention looking like a moron by still smoking, i.e. social issues) BUT they saved my lungs. How much are functional lungs worth? They were the difference between life and death from smoking. Yet, I'm still having a hard time getting off and STAYING off the lozenges. Frustrating!!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 14 months ago from Central New Jersey

      I hear you, lozenge user. No question that lozenges really do help. I could never have stayed off cigarette without them. I say don't hate yourself.... very unproductive. Congratulations for getting off and staying off of cigarettes. That is a huge achievement. When you are ready to try again to unload the lozenges for good, try the methods people have shared here in these comments to taper down and really get off them by substituting something else. Adding a support group of people quitting smoking either online or in real life might also be helpful. Above all, don't be hard on yourself about still using the lozenges. That's why they call it addiction :-) If it were easy to quit, there would be no problem. You are not weak willed, or a bad person..... you are just addicted to nicotine. It's biochemical..... not a moral issue. Thanks for sharing in these comments and very good luck to you.

    • profile image

      Chris B. 6 months ago

      I am currently quitting nicotine lozenges after a 10 year addiction. What's crazy is that I smoked for less time (7 years). I quit the lozenges for 1.5 years and then went back. The key to quitting, is using the patch. With the patch, there are no behaviors tied to the substance. There's no immediate rush when you put a patch on and it it takes up to 3 hours to enter your bloodstream. The patch regulates the dose for you, so you can get on with your day without the added stress of regulating your addiction. If you have to have something in your mouth at the same time, use tic tacs or mint chicklets. That behavior is not tied to the substance rush and will die out. I strongly suggest using the patch but following the full program, not modifying it with any other nicotine replacement. Patches will have a higher success rate. Good luck everyone!

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 6 months ago from Central New Jersey

      I think you are right ChrisB. I wish I had stayed on the patch and never used the lozenges. Far from " tapering off". They just got me more hooked on nicotine. Thanks for putting in your 2 cents

    • profile image

      Lora2 5 months ago

      I have been addicted to the lozenges for 14 years. I quit smoking when my grandchild was born. For 12 of these years I used the regular lozenges, which did a number on my teeth. I then switched to the minis. I need to quit ! I am going to try your suggestion, but I am really not sure if I can. Would u suggest trying the patch,, I use probably 40 a day.

    • profile image

      Melanie 4 months ago

      So many inspiring stories. Alas, I am not one.

      I always wanted to smoke cigatettes and started at 11. Loved being a smoker. Tried a half assed attempt to quit with tbr gum, but actually liked them.

      Now ive been Addicted to gum for over 15 years, I broke "rule #1", I smoked too when I used the gum. Tried patches, spray, lozenges, inhalers, but always back to the gum. And still smoking. The gum has helped me cut back to 30-40 cigarettes a day, but I need my gum and just can't quit smoking or my gum.

      Best wishes to all addicts. Break rule #1 and prepare to puff and chew your life away. Xxxx

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 4 months ago from Central New Jersey

      Hello Lora2 and Melanie. Thanks for stopping by and adding your two cents..... both of you left such honest comments. Lora2--why not try the patch? It might work for you. I hear you on the teeth-- lozenges did a number on mine too. and Melanie, it's all about the addiction, you are right, but there is always hope. You too might want to consider doing the patch and ditching both the cigarettes and the lozenges-- just a thought :-)

    • profile image

      Melanie 4 months ago

      Thanks Robie, I was honest and I wonder how many others are hooked on chewing gum and smoke while chewing the gum.

      I tried patches every day for over a year and whilst they helped me cut down smoking, I still smoked and gradually upped my smoking as I got used to the patch. Then started on the gum again, that was 5 years ago.

      Have you come across smokers who also use gum or lozenges? Have they been able

      I think too using gum and drinking coffee and alcohol really accelerates the addiction to the gum.

      I'm a happy person, not depressed. Just your quintessential "I love my cigarettes" smoker, but am also a closet gum addict. I hope I one day flick the switch, its just hard when you enjoy it so much!

    • profile image

      Lori Lewis 3 months ago

      I quit using NRT, and now have been using 2 mg lozenges for almost 2 years now, the 81 lozenge package lasts 4 days, and costs $50. A carton of my cigs only cost $32 and lasted 10 days, so really, I have traded addiction to one for a more expensive addiction, and am struggling to get off, but cannot seem to cut down below 17 lozenges per day at 2 mg each. Phoey on NRT.

    • profile image

      Karen 3 months ago

      OK. Here I am. Twenty years after quitting smoking and STILL addicted to nicotine gum. I still remember getting a prescription for it before I finally quit. I chew about 30 2-mg a day. I shop online for the cheapest price. I hear ya. I really need to get off this stuff, if only for the money!

      I probably need help... :(

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 3 months ago from Central New Jersey

      OK I'm responding to the last three comments here.

      Hi again Melanie-- yes I have run into others who smoked and used lozenges or patches. I treally isn't a good idea because you now have a double addiction to nicotine in two forms to fight instead of one. The first thing to do is to get yourself off the cigs totally. Use either lozenges or patches but not both and just get the cigs out of the house. You might want to try a support group as well, for some in-person reinforcement. Don' t be in a hurry to start tapering off the patch or lozenges, just get yourself off cigarettes and above all... don't be hard on yourself. Just keep on trying till you make it. Good luck.

      Lori--Good to see you too and thanks for your comment. I know the lozenges are expensive, but don't fall into the trap you are setting for yourself and start smoking again. Don't worry about the expense of NRT, it is a lot easier on your lungs than smoking and won't give you cancer :-) if you make a serious plan to cut down on the lozenges ( maybe with the help of your doctor, or an in person weekly support group like Nicotine Anonymous, you perhaps can begin to taper down on the lozenges. Good luck to you too.

      I hear you, Karen, I gave up smoking cigarettes in 2000, but chewed the gum and sucked on the lozenges till 2008 or 9 and had some horrendous dental bills btw. I decided to treat the lozenge addiction seriously as an addiction and developed my tapering plan-- it worked for me because I was ready to quit, but you need o do whatever works for you and yes, you probably do need some help from either your doctir or an in person support group in your area. You really dont have to do this alone and it really is an addiction not just a bad habit. Get all the help you can and don' f feel bad about it ... Good luck to you as well.

      Thanks to all three of you for your honesty and really helpful comments.

    • profile image

      sandbaby 2 months ago

      Does anyone know WHY lozenges and gum cause cavities? I have researched the ingredients and mannitol and sucralose are not suppose to cause cavities, so I don't understand why all of a sudden I have 4 cavities, when I haven't had any for years and years.

    • profile image

      Ron 2 months ago

      Too bad the manufacturers don't make the next step in nicotine replacement therapy.....0.0mg of nicotine I know I'm addicted to the 2mg of nicotine but I'm also addicted to the taste and the sucking on the lozenges. If I could get a 0.0mg of nicotine lozenge that taste the same I feel it would give me a better chance at success.

      Anyone know of a hard candy with similar taste to the cherry flavor lozzenge?

    • profile image

      bc1965 2 months ago

      Same here. I quit smoking in 2011 and haven't had a cavity in years. I've been using the Thrive 1MG lozenges ever since, and in the last four months I've had three cavities. Perhaps a coincidence but I cannot think of what else it could be. My oral hygiene is exemplary, aside from the lozenges.

    • profile image

      Joel Weeks 2 months ago

      That's no shocker, really. After all, what do you think you're addicted to? Tobacco!!!! No, Margaret, it is the NICOTINE your brain is craving. The ONLY way to beat an addiction into submission is cold turkey. Nicotine replacement therapies are far from the 'solution' and only serve to enrich those that market them. I know....I was addicted to Copenhagen for nearly FOUR decades.

    • profile image

      PF Bankroller 2 months ago

      I have been addicted to lozenges for about 10+ years....I lost count. Is tarted using them when they first came out. I am glad to be off cigarettes, but traded one addiction or another. I would love help.

    • robie2 profile image
      Author

      Roberta Kyle 2 months ago from Central New Jersey

      Thank you Joel Weeks and PF Bankroller for adding your voices and experience here. As Joel says, it's no big mystery. Nicotine is what you are addicted to and it comes in lozenges and gum as well as cigarettes. To kick any addiction is no easy task. It takes committment, time AND above all, self honesty. Nicotine replacement therapy can be helpful in quitting cigarettes, but clearly, it has its own dangers because nicotine addiction is nicotine addiction no matter what substance it comes from.

    Click to Rate This Article