Disease, Illness & ConditionsAches & PainsOral HealthInjuriesDigestive HealthEye CareWellnessAlternative MedicineChildren's HealthOlder AdultsFirst AidMental HealthDisabilitiesHealth Care IndustryReproductive Health

What Is Maladaptive Daydreaming?

Updated on February 15, 2017
DaydreamerJay profile image

I'm most definitely a maladaptive daydreamer. I also have inattentive ADD, mild OCD, anxiety disorder, and a number of other challenges.

What is Maladaptive Daydreaming and Why Should I Care?

Everyone daydreams. But some of us daydream excessively, to the point that it interferes with our day-to-day, real lives. It can take many forms. At times it can even involve what people might call "imaginary friends." Many may feel ashamed, childish, embarrassed, isolated, and not know where to turn. They might spend hours pacing, rocking, listening to music, lost in their heads. Does this sound like you or someone you know? You're not alone.

For those of you familiar with dissociation, and the dissociative spectrum, you may already be aware that daydreaming is considered a "normal" form of dissociation. The general public and mental health community is not yet fully aware of the existence, let alone the impact, of Maladaptive Daydreaming. It is slowly finding its way into the public consciousness as more and more people come forward and begin to open up about this often secret, but life-altering problem.

Symptoms of Maladaptive Daydreaming

  • It often begins in childhood. It may start out as an imaginary friend or simple random daydreams brought on by loneliness, struggles, neglect, a trauma, abuse, anxiety, or other stress related events. It then begins to develop and grow into a more chronic form of daydreaming. It can also start later in life, but it generally begins in childhood.
  • Daydreaming tends to have triggers. Even someone who has found a fairly stable way to control their excessive daydreaming, can find themselves being pulled back in by triggers. Some triggers include, but aren't limited to: Television, movies, music, books, real life events, new traumas, facing old traumas, anxiety, stress, and other outside stimuli. These triggers can pull them right back into daydreaming excessively. Even something good, like a movie they enjoy, can take them out of the world for hours upon hours on end.
  • Daydreaming feels like an addiction. Some of you who don't experience Maladaptive Daydreaming may be thinking, so what if they daydream too much, what's the big deal? They think everything is a disorder nowadays! It's not like they're an alcoholic, drug addict or have a gambling problem. The problem is that it is an addiction in the same way as any other addiction. It can be all consuming and impede on peoples' abilities to lead a healthy, happy, full life.
  • A compulsion to daydream. They may avoid friends, work, family, life in general, in favor of their daydreams. It just happens many times, taking them away before they even realize that it's been weeks since they've been in touch with this person or done that thing. They can lose friends, jobs, family support, be alienated and isolated as they daydream for hours and hours daily sometimes.
  • Novel or movie-like and elaborate daydreams. Maladaptive Daydreamers aren't just casually having random fantasies they tuck away and leave behind as they go on about their lives the way the average person does. Their daydreams can often resemble the details you might find in your favorite book or television series. They might develop entire false realities of their own. These daydreams often include complex characters (imagined/imaginary people), relationships, plots, stories, situations, places, images, with details beyond belief. They may have heroes, villains, families, friends, enemies, fantasy creatures, real life scenarios, and everything and anything in between. Ask a Maladaptive Daydreamer to give you the details of some of their daydreams and you'll find yourself swept up into a whole new world.
  • Daydreaming, but not losing touch with reality. Maladaptive Daydreamers may become so absorbed in their daydreams that they feel emotionally attached to the people, places, and relationships they've developed in their own minds. A few may even feel like their daydreams are more real to them than their real lives. But they never lose touch with the fact that it is in fact all fantasy. They haven't lost touch with reality. They don't believe the people, worlds, places in their daydreams are real. They don't ever get confused between fantasy and reality. They're very aware of the real life going on around them and that their fantasies are just that.

Physical Signs of Maladaptive Daydreaming

Another sign of a Maladaptive Daydreamer is that many, though not all, tend to have their own repetitive behaviors while they're daydreaming. Some may have only one behavior they do repeatedly while daydreaming and they may not even do it every time they daydream, but only in certain situations. Others may have various different repetitive behaviors they use. Some of the common repetitive behaviors by Maladaptive Daydreamers include: pacing, rocking, holding an object and shaking or tapping it, tapping a foot, dancing, spinning, etc.

If you or someone you love is showing signs or symptoms of losing touch with actual reality, then you need to seek out professional help because something else is going on. It may be something more than daydreaming, maladaptive or otherwise.

While we may think it's cute to see a small child playing with their imaginary friend, it becomes more uncomfortable when an older child or adult does so. This is something many of us with Maladaptive Daydreaming learn to hide or wait until we're alone to daydream too fully. Because some other behaviors associated with Madalaptive Daydreaming include: Making facial expressions, laughing, crying, moving one's lips/mouthing words, whispering, talking out loud, and gesturing with hands.

Again, some may think this sort of behavior to be very bizarre, but it is fairly common amongst Maladaptive Daydreamers.

Is excessive daydreaming always a bad thing? Does being a Maladaptive Daydreamer mean I'm mentally ill? Should be I ashamed of my daydreaming?

No. No. And no. Some people with Maladaptive Daydreaming have learned to harness the creativity they normally would exert toward daydreaming, and use it in more productive ways. They have also learned to explore just what caused them to begin daydreaming so excessively, learned to recognize their triggers, and learned to accept themselves.

Maladaptive Daydreamers tend to be imaginative, creative, intelligent people. Finding ways to fuel that imagination of yours into healthy creative outlets is a great way to utilize something you or others may see as a negative, and turn it into a positive. Artists, actors, writers, musicians, inventors, and many other professions can be wonderful ways in which being a daydreamer can work for, and not against you. If not a profession, it can also be channeled into a healthy and fun hobby. Even one you can share with others!

You shouldn't be any more ashamed of your daydreaming than you should of anything else that makes you, uniquely you!

I think daydreaming is interfering with my life. I really don't like it anymore. How can I stop?

Seek out others who feel the same way you do and can help offer you support. This can be extremely helpful. First, you won't feel so alone and frustrated. Secondly, you'll have others who relate, understand, and can give you solid advice on where to turn and what to do.

Therapy can also be very helpful. A therapist, counselor, or psychologist that you're comfortable with and can be open with, can help unravel why you daydream excessively and find tools to help you heal old wounds, and cope with current problems in ways that are healthier for you.

Creative outlets. Look for outlets for that amazing imagination for yours! Instead of thinking of your Maladaptive Daydreaming as a disorder, syndrome, or illness that is ruining your life, turn it around and make it work for you. Maybe you have a passion for painting, or always wanted to be an actor/actress. Look for a painting class or find a play to audition for. Find careers that work best for creative people and see if there is one out there that you might thrive in. Even if you don't find a life career, you might find a healthy, fun hobby to put your energies into that makes you happy.

These things, and I'm sure others, can help make your excessive daydreaming enhance your life, rather than impede it.

Online Resources for Maladaptive Daydreamers

Here are some tools that may help you!

Are You Daydreaming Your Life Away?

Informative site by a Maladaptive Daydreamer with even more links and information.

Wild Minds Network

A supportive place with blogs, forums and plenty of other things for those of us with Maladaptive Daydreaming

Maladaptive Daydreaming on Facebook

Connect With Other Maladaptive Daydreamers on the Experience Project

Daydreaming, Escapism, and PTSD

Learn a few potential causes of Maladaptive Daydreaming and other information that might be helpful to you.

Daydreamers - Maladaptive or Not

Whether you're a Maladaptive Daydreamer, or just occasionally enjoy daydreaming, I'm interested in what you have to say.

What seems to trigger your daydreams the most?

See results

Leave a Comment, let me know what you're thinking.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      jade 2 months ago

      wowwww i was just thinking about it....and decided to ask what is was....and was shocked it had results!!!!!!!!!!!

    • profile image

      Carlie 3 months ago

      I ever knew it had a name. I've been doing this my whole life. I'm 18 now and I thought it was just a weird quirk I had. J pace and listen to music everyday. My family all know about it and have even encouraged it because I have tendencies to freak out or becoming very agitated when I don't get to "walk". I'm just glad I don't feel alone.

    • profile image

      Every daydreaming 3 months ago

      So interesting, I've done this since as long as I can remember (I'm in my mid 40's) but never knew it had a name. Fascinating to know others share the same struggles. School was so hard for me- diagnosed with ADD in seventh grade but it was before they even knew how to treat it. Trying to focus on anything that didn't interest me or being in a situation I didn't like would usually start my daydreams- sometimes multiple ones at the same time. I totally took myself mentally out of the real world sometimes for hours at a time. Even though I would be reading schoolwork or having conversations and functioning in the real world I wasn't totally mentally always there. Very interesting

    • profile image

      Bre 5 months ago

      I just happened to look up some of the things I do. And then I realized I had this. And to me it's nothing really serious. When I listen to music, I pace back and forth and also make facial expressions and other different movemen's depending on the image I'm having. Some of my family membermembers don't understand it at all...but I use this for good as well (it said it could be used for good in the article)! I write stories based on the imagives I've had. People read them and really like them. I really hope that whoever has this shouldn't be ashamed of it. It can be a really great thing.

    • profile image

      Anonymous 5 months ago

      I didn't realize there was even a name for this or so many other people have it. I've been doing this ever since I was a teenager, often for hours a day. I do it first thing when I wake up before everyone else, in the dark by myself. I listen to music and rock back and forth and - I don't know how to describe it - flail my arms. Anyone who has walked in on me thinks it's the strangest thing they've seen. I'm also prone to talk to myself or laugh. Often my daydreaming includes narratives that I build on over time, developing the plot and characters.

      I found "maladaptive daydreaming" because I wanted to research my rocking back and forth. I'm now 33, and after doing it for ~2 decades I'm concerned it might have long term effects on my brain from rocking too much for hours a day. Does anyone else have these issues?

      I'm otherwise fairly adjusted. I have good job, married, although I suffer from ADHD and procrastination (often as a result of spending to much time MDing), but otherwise I have a fine social life.

      I felt compelled to write here because I didn't realize how many other people do this. I get cranky if I go for days without doing it, which reminds me of withdrawal. Anxiety certainly triggers my desire to do it, but I do it regardless.

      I often think I'd be much more productive if I could abandon the behavior. How have others succeeded? And does anyone have any research on long term brain structure impact?

    • profile image

      mrs. p 2 years ago

      I first heard the term MD when I was looking for affirmations to help with my social anxiety. I saw an affirmation list to stop dreaming which sparked my curiosity to see if there were other excessive daydreamers like me. I did a few google search and much to my surprise I found out about MD, and many stories were similar to mine. It's comforting to know that I am not alone, but I really need help.

      I've suffered from MD since I was 10 (I'm 34 now). I have no history of abuse or experienced trauma. I come from what I would consider a "normal" family. However, on my mother's side there a cases of mental illness and I have a sister who is bipolar. I've always been shy. I don't know what triggered my MD, but I remember creating this fantasy world where I would be cool and everyone would want to around me. I will and still do either bounce on a bed or run back and forth in a room for hours while listening to music. I can do this all day. It's like an addiction. I get such a high from it, and I just can't stop. I'm emotiomally attached to all the characters in my dream which mostly are celebrities. The issue now is that I'm married with 3 kids, and I waste much of my days in this fantasy world to point that I'm neglecting my household duties and other things. My husband doesn't know of this. Thank God who is such a patient and loving person. He does not complain about the house being messy or me not cooking at times when I've been home all day. I just worry about my kids. I just feel like I'm not giving as much the as they deserve because I can't control my urges to lock myself in my room and drift off into my fantasy world. Every time I try to give up, after a few days, I relapse and it gets worst then before. I'm willing to consider medication at this point. I need to work. I need to live. I need to be a better wife and mother. I really need help :-(

    • profile image

      anonymous 2 years ago

      Ifaced so many difficulties after marriage.from childhood l have this problem in dresms i am a beautiful girl having so many boys who like me. Now i sm married i have a smart snd very loving husband but still those dreams or day dreaming chasing me i feel ashamed on myself and want to get rid from it as i mention above that after marriage i faced many problems from my inlaws so some most of the time in my daydream i saw that i am confronting them boldly and thud show that i am not inferior from them

    • profile image

      Angela 2 years ago

      My day dreams are mostly about an anime character that I had build up from the actual anime show, Naruto. When I was younger my older brother would always watch Naruto and it sort of grew on me and now because of that I always imagine these "episodes" or "movies" where my character and Naruto have adventures and go through life together. I have created a whole elaborate backstory for my character too. Also in school during art class when I am supposed to do projects I take that time to draw up my character because I just wanna see it come to life, because in my mind I can visually have glimpses of what the character looks like and her powers and everything, but I feel as if everyone should get to see her too. It really is my way of escapin my life to be honest.

    • profile image

      daisy 3 years ago

      Hahajjsjsnshs

    • DaydreamerJay profile image
      Author

      DaydreamerJay 4 years ago

      @pepys: The words that come to mind for you are words that come from a place of lack of knowledge of the subject matter. The same way such words come to mind when one hears of any addiction. Will power plays a role in deciding something needs to be done. But a lot more has to happen before it can be done. Support, resources, and the understanding that the actual physical chemicals in your brain have changed and cause reactions, withdrawals, physical symptoms, and are not as easily overlooked as simply 'you are weak willed' as many would like to think. If will power alone were the cure for addiction, obesity wouldn't be on the rise, nor would we see so many casinos being open up everywhere, alcoholism would decline immensely, etc. We lack an understanding of the way addiction effects our minds and bodies and how to be ride of it. It is far more complex than any one person's flippant response could ever remedy, I'm afraid.

    • DaydreamerJay profile image
      Author

      DaydreamerJay 4 years ago

      @anonymous: You are most definitely not weird. You are very normal and very not alone.

    • DaydreamerJay profile image
      Author

      DaydreamerJay 4 years ago

      @anonymous: You are most definitely not alone. I'm so glad you are finally getting some answers to what is going on with you so you can maybe start to find some solutions that help you. If the man you're living with is as perfect as you believe, then he will be understanding when you feel ready to take the time to sit down and talk to him about what might be going on with you. You, and others here, might also look into the symptoms of ADD which can also be something people with Maladaptive Daydreaming deal with.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I feel the same way. I've hid it for years, only mentioned that it was something I did when I was young but I have never told anyone, not even my family, that at 23 I'm still doing the same thing. I like to have that interesting twist on reality, but if I'm the only one who sees it then it's not as fun anymore. I recently moved in with whom I believe to be the perfect man, but he doesn't know what I do all day when I don't have work. He thinks that I'm purposely just sitting around all day but what really happens... I get sucked into hours of pacing and daydreaming like I did when I was a kid. I look up at the clock and without even knowing it, 3 hours have passed. I didn't know this was "normal" or a "thing" till 15 minutes ago and I actually got the guts to look it up. When I read the description I started shaking and crying. I'm a good writer, but lately I've been feeling depressed and lethargic. I have a hard time getting myself to do anything but daydream when I'm not doing what's required of me as a working human being.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I feel the exact same way, and was ashamed of it since I was 8 years old. Until recently I discovered that it's a thing.

      When I read or watch something I add my own little storyline to it, so that it matches with my fantasy world. I guess to relate to it better ...

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I'm having issues with myself having excessive daydreaming. It moslty triggers when i listen to music, watching movie, walking or sometimes if an event happened and it turned out the way i didn't want it. i would imagine things that supposed to happen. it kind of scared me cos it's seems not normal. i'm wondering how is it feels like not imagining things at all but it sounds a bit boring. this excessive daydreaming puts my life into something colorful but by the end of the day i know it's not real and that kind of make me sad. thou sometimes it helps me to do what i want to do so i can make those imaginations be real. good to read that their are people like me. i thought i'm alone in this situation.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      im so happy that other people have this problem! i thought i was just weird because i shake my hands a lot and pace when i daydream

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @DaydreamerJay: yea i tried that , i wrote a 'love letter' to myself in a boys POV and my mom found that letter and she acussed me of begin gay?lesbian and i was sooo embarrassed because im not i was just writing a love letter to myself as a guy.. but yea i was very embarrassed and my moms a snooper so i can't write or hide anything and i mean NOTHING from her

    • pepys profile image

      pepys 4 years ago

      You´ve got me daydreaming now about a maladjusted daydream ... seriously though we all have moments of daydreaming, the problem is when it interferes with the rest of life. I have no idea about how you should deal with this, but the phrase "will power" and "discipline" come to mind. They are easy words, but the only way to strengthen and deveolopm them is by applying them.

    • NibsyNell profile image

      NibsyNell 4 years ago

      I daydream A LOT! But I don't think of it as a bad thing. I never think daydreaming interferes with my life, only that life interferes with my daydreaming.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Sweet hish, I have the same issue, how old are you? I've just entered my teens, I hope it doesn't continue, but it's like my way of coping with these things. You know? You sound like a really awesome person!! But don't freak out, it helps to talk to a friend about it.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Hey I don't know if you'll see this. BUT OMG! I also walk around and act out what I think about. In fact it's hard not to wave those hands when I daydream. I feel like I've been getting to know one person my whole life and falling for them, only to crash and realize they aren't real and probably never will be. I always listen to music while i pace around a room looking very odd indeed, and I love reading and movies but mostly those help me stop. I kind of think it's cool to be able to feel in love and grief and simulate feelings almost as if they are real and feel them so strongly... although something I end up crying wayyy to hard and realize that it's kind of for nothing :S... I dunno if this is good for my health so I try and focus on happy daydreams. I am happy others are like me and yet sad, because it can be too much sometimes and I wish I was living in reality more than in my head...

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I am definitely a big daydreamer, the maladaptive type described here. I'll just space out and be in one of my fantasy worlds, usually when taking walks or on public transportation/ passenger in a car. Sometimes it also takes the form of conversations or scenes that could have happened instead of one that just did, or my friends and I being some sort of non-human entities, such as demons or aliens hidden amongst normal humans. If I'm getting really involved in a dream- typically when walking long distances alone (on more quiet roads/woods, not busy cities)- I'll talk out loud what some of the characters are saying, or move my hands. Ocassionally someone may pass me and give me an odd look, which is a bit embarrassing and snaps me out for a slight bit before I continue it. I've been doing this as long as I can remember- in fact, some of the worlds I've constructed started when I was barely in school, so just under 20 years ago. I can remember a lot of the dreams very vividly, sometimes even clearer than memories of reality. That could be a bit bad, seeing as reality is arguably the thing to be remembered more, but I don't really mind. I do have a dissociative disorder as well, which may relate, but they feel different to me when each happens so I don't think so, especially since they come about separately, sometimes overlapping but they happen on their own, not linked. The depersonalization is something I really want to get rid of, whereas the dreaming I definitely want to stay. Plus, the dreaming started long before the dissociation stuff.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I starting daydreaming more in my teens as I started writing a novel and would go into that world sometimes. However, now I'm twenty and within the last few months I've started daydreaming excessively. I can spent hours daydreaming and it's not even about my novel's world anymore. It's really affecting my life and I've been neglecting my university classes and social life sometimes without even realising it - I just lose track of time or I would rather be in a fantasy world because I hate reality. I don't have traumatic experiences, I don't do repetitive movements, I never had imaginary friends and this did not start in childhood, but the other symptoms sound like me. I think I started daydreaming more because I don't like the way my life is going anymore and I want to escape it. It has turned into an obsession or addiction though.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I do and have done all the same stuff, except in my daydreams there is usually so big fantasy element or a totally crazy plot line. So no you don't sound crazy to me. I understand. It is kinda comforting to know what it is though.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I've had a few of these problems my whole life. Sometimes, when I was a toddler, I would be on my own for awhile so I had plenty of time to play with toys and come up with some pretty impressive scenarios involving Batman and something unrelated like Mickey Mouse. As I started getting older I developed a pacing habit, but only when no one was around. I would feel inclined to pace back and forth in a straight line where my imagination would completely take over and it would be as if I was creating movies in my mind. Everything was expertly detailed, down to specific voices, colors, shapes, and surroundings and I would completely lose track of my pacing to the point where I no longer felt myself doing it. I would get lost in these awesome daydreams. Now, despite all this, I could, at will, stop pacing and stop daydreaming. I'm 19 years old now and every now and then I would have these burst moments of imagination and I feel an impulse to do the pacing act again. I've tried doing this sitting down normally, y'know, like most people daydream but for some reason it just wouldn't work unless I was pacing. Just to put it to rest, I'd pace for a few minutes just to get the idea out of my head and go about my business. This usually only happens at home, as I've pretty much come to terms as to how to control it while elsewhere. The only other thing I've noticed is that I can sit down and imagine if I have music. Then I get into the rhythm of hearing the music and envisioning it into a fitting scenario. Once stuff like this can be used controllably though, it's quite a bit of fun to see what all I can come up with. LOL.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I was a GIANT daydreamer at 5 years old,i was curious as a mouse and i could't stop at all and i did some really fun stuff to like really scary stuff, even the most gross stuff.

      I went to Walt Disney World while i was daydreaming on like vacation.I was insane with it and while i was doing it i was mostly happy, scared,wild ,hyper even funny.I still feel like a monster sometimes,now i'm all grown up.I was doing for 2 decades and i was so scared!!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hey, I've had maladaptive daydreaming for at least 5/6 years. It was articles like this which made me realise I had a problem about 8 months ago and I've been trying to get out of this maladaptive cycle since. I've just started a blog about my recovery as I see a lot of people asking how to get help and not a lot about what options they actually have.

      It's on wordpress, called Diary of a dreamer.

      Take a look if you want :)

      C x

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I've always been a heavy daydreamer, and sometimes I think its just a little heavier than most people. Other times, it absorbs me constantly. I jump between the two.

      It doesn't negatively affect my life too much, and I don't worry about it a whole lot, but when it becomes too much, I look to things like music (playing it on an instrument especially) and my close friends to distract me from the daydreams.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Ever since i was small, umm.. around 6 or so.. I have developed this habit of talking to imaginary friends I used to have. It seems normal for a little girl to do so. But what if it becomes addictive and it's some how ruining your life?

      Imaginary friends were then. Later growing up, I have developed to talk to myself and to pace around dreaming. Not weird stuff. But dreaming that how things should have happened. How I wanted my life to be.. What should I have said in that situation.. You know, sometimes I dream about me being something..

      My mum and family knew about my condition.They didn't take it seriously.

      Also, when I listen to music.. I went back to my dreams.. I dream about stuff, walking.

      it's affected my life. I can't concentrate on things. When I watch something, read a book, anything happened.. it triggers me to daydream. anything. When I study, my mind become preoccupied & I feel the urge to dream & pace around.

      I sound crazy don't I?

      Best thing about dreaming like that is, it helps me forget the world. I'm like inside of it. There was a period in my life that I used to lock inside in my room, never coming out.. just dreaming. I didn't know how things are going in my home. My parents made it a big issue.. tries to talk to me but some how, I shut them up in my mind.

      I don't wanna go out. I don't feel like having friends. It seems like my dreams were important than anything else.

      I dunno what to do.. It's like taking over me... & after so many years, I found out what I have..

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Wow, I can't believe after all these years, I have found out what I have. I have always wondered if it was normal to have this daydreaming hobby of mine and now I understand completely. I have so many of this symptoms and characteristics it is unbelievable. I always wanted to know if there were others like me. I definitely know the difference between fantasy and reality but I do have a fantasy family which is everything I have always wanted to be. They give me comfort and provide me with strength to be the person I want to be. I have so many complex characters in my fantasy life but I understand completely they are a fantasy. Sometimes I think I could take my fantasy family and write a book about their adventures, lol. Anyway glad to have found out what this condition is although it will still remain my secret. I would never tell anyone I have this.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I've suffered from this for as long as I remember and I thought it was a serious mental illness or I was crazy until now. I did come out of it when I was like 10 by socializing more because I was very secretive and shy but then a year later it came back and now it's effecting my school work and I've developed depression and anxiety but I feel better finding people like me.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I actually managed to get my MD under control and then I began being stressed. Neighbours have begun commenting so I changed my diet, began volunteering and went for long walks. I force myself to play my instruments even when I don't wish to just to focus my mind and control my thoughts. I have also begun to mediatate and believe me, it works. So for the first time in my life I feel like I might be cured.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      sometimes i wonder how i can have these feeling, for example falling in love and getting my heartbroken and then crying about it and know is not real. I love the feelings but i hate it, because i know the truth, how can i feel these feeling wothout ever experiencing them. im always researching about everything, i learn but never experienced anything and yet when i daydream it feels so real and i feel like a normal person. Sorry im having a hard time explaining what i mean right now.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      im so happy to finally find people like me. I have been this way since i was a little girl. It has gotten in the way of my studies, i would actually start to study and drift of in a couple of seconds and keep reading the same line over and over. I love to read and watch movies and listen to music they are my m ain triggers. I also find myself falling in love with certain characters in my world and getting heart broken and then finding someone new. I cry and mouth out words and make hand gestures. I have stopped mouthing out words cause i ussually did it work and i found a co worker looking at me weirdly so i have to bite my lip when i find myself daydreaming and feel mouthing out words. i still doit but not as much i think i replaced with hand gestures and i can't stop doing it when i realize im doing it is to late to stop it. to be honest i like daydreaming but i also get sad because i know is not i do write a lot stories and i never finish them and i draw a lot to these thing do calm me down. but anyway thank you i do feel so much better there are others like me.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I have anxiety, just below medical depression and have self-harmed in the past, and what causes most of my sadness is my daydreaming and knowing it isn't real. I have been on childline and explained my problems but they replied with "Contact your doctor, it seems you have a lot of problems right now and we cannot seem to find a suggestion or reason, just see a doctor and they should be able to help you" and i have seen many doctors and they pass it off as another mental illness or say i will get a mental illness if i don't stop doing things like isolating myself in my bedroom to go into a ''fantasy world" as they put it. But i feel like i cannot live without my fanatsys but i want to get rid of them, but i'm too attachted and i have been daydreaming ecessively since 6-7 years old...

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I know what you mean, i have the same problem with an anime character (Russia from Hetalia) and i role play on a site called wattpad. But all i want to do is daydream, i'll put headphones on and cover my eyes and just make up plots and so on in my head for hours. Its the only thing that seems to make me happy and sometimes i find myself cryingn't because i know the characters are not real and that it is all in my head and isn't real, And that 'hurts' in a way. When my mom says no computer i will cry for hours and slam around and mumble about being lonely and empty without being able to roleplay with others and write excessive amounts of fanficition. And this all started when i lost my dad when i was 7, because i started getting bullied and beaten by the bullies that i made up my own world where i was liked and loved by everyone. But when i get back into reality it tears me apart. I always value my dreams and i often loose sleep over daydreaming. Like i am writing this at 1:14am before school.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I think I suffered from MD as a child, and I think I still do. It wasn't until I was 16 that I started to realize that it wasn't normal and it was incredibly unhealthy for me to zone out all the time. I was starting to do important exams and realized the this extensive day dreaming was getting in the way, but i could give it up. If I tried to stop i became anxious and agitated, it was like I was addicted. I think what started it was the bullying i received as a child, and my dysfunctional family. I wont go into detail but from the ages of 8-16 all I remember is being incredibly lonely and possibly depressed. I hated my life, my school, who I was, and where I was. I created these characters in my head so I didn't feel so alone, and they eventually became companions as they were the only ones I could trust. I used films and book to escape, using the characters but I would created my own plots in my head. I would research for hours to make sure what I was creating was accurate.. I would use music to increase the mood of the scene I was creating, and could spend a full day creating these story line. They became real and they were that vivid I could make myself cry or feel electric with joy. When I really tried to stop I started to suffer from panic attack that lasted for a year or two. I was actually having to take reality seriously and think about my future and it took a while for me to "wake up". Day dreaming was and still is a comfort blanket for me. It's a source of entertainment and a way to relax and reduce my stress levels. It helps in the creative subjects I'm currently doing too. I've never told anyone because I think they'd probably think I was mad, and until I did research thought I was the only one who did this. It's not as bad as it once was but if I want to I can completely zone out, switch my senses off but I try and not do it as often encase I can't stop. I'm starting to plan for university and I need to focus on my studies rather than drifting off and wasting time. I'm happier now then I once was, and feel confident in myself and I think that's the differences. I don't need to dream of a better life or a better me because I'm creating one in the real world. I'm in control,I'm the person I want to be and I don't feel trapped. I've learnt to control it and I think I've got the balance right.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I think I suffered from MD as a child, and I think I still do. It wasn't until I was 16 that I started to realize that it wasn't normal and it was incredibly unhealthy for me to zone out all the time. I was starting to do important exams and realized that this extensive day dreaming was getting in the way, but i could give it up. If I tried to stop i became anxious and agitated, it was like I was addicted. I've thought about it and I think the cause of my MD was the bullying i received as a child, and my dysfunctional family. I wont go into detail but from the ages of 8-16 I remember being incredibly lonely and possibly depressed. I hated my life, my school, who I was, and where I was. I felt trapped so I created these characters in my head and these places to escape. I didn't feel so alone, and these characters eventually became companions as they were the only ones I could trust because I created them. I used films and book; using the characters but I would created my own plots in my head. I would research for hours, memorizing the sound of the actors voices, their faces and even the settings so my dreams were 100% accurate. I would use music to increase the mood of the scene I was creating, and could spend a full day creating these story line. They became real and they were that vivid I could make myself cry or feel electric with joy. When I really tried to stop I started to suffer from anxiety attack that lasted for a year or two. I was actually having to take reality seriously and think about my future and it took a while for me to "wake up". Day dreaming was and still is a comfort blanket for me. It's a source of entertainment and a way to relax and reduce my stress levels. I've never told anyone because I think they'd probably think I was mad, and until I did research thought I was the only one who did this. It's not as bad as it once was but if I want to I can completely zone out, switch my senses off but I try and not do it as often encase I can't stop. I'm starting to plan for university and I need to focus on my studies rather than drifting off and wasting time. I'm happier now then I once was, and feel confident in myself and I think that's the major differences. I don't have to dream about a better life because I have one. :)

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      My 10 year old daughter sits in a chair-sometimes with headphones listening to music and bangs her head on back of chair (soft one) She also "twists" a Barbie doll in her hand while making faces and she can do this for an hour or so at a time. I have been told Tourettes, Aspergers, OCD, ADHD. She goes to Occupational therapy and now we have an appt in May to have a neuropsych. evaluation to be done. She has been doing the faces and twisting (started with her hands) since she was about a year old. She used to make noises in her throat a lot while doing it but that has quieted it down a lot. She has learned to control it in school because kids were saying things to her and i seems she lets it out at home. She is normal in every other way-a little high strung though, impatient at times, but I don't know if that's just normal. She had a lot of ear infections as a baby even requiring tubes but otherwise healthy. She is a handful at home sometimes but is perfect at school. Never gets in trouble at school. Not violent. I am just so concerned....

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I daydream a little bit everyday (and talk to myself constantly whenever I am alone). Still, I am a highly successful professional, wife, and mother, who hides that side of me really well. After reading this article, I get it. When I am at my worst and lowest from too much stress, I seek hours of alone time with music (usually hiding out at work under the premise that I am working--like right now). I then surf the internet to read, learn, and fantasize. Guess I never really knew all the daydreaming was a coping mechanism. No wonder I come away from my alone time so recharged. I'm realize I'm a bit of a daydreaming / fantasy addict. Still, the person that goes back home is so much better from the daydreaming escape. I get seriously frazzled, forgetful, and downright bitter when I cannot spend ample time daydreaming. Thanks for the article.

    • DaydreamerJay profile image
      Author

      DaydreamerJay 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Thank you for the tip! You're very right.

    • DaydreamerJay profile image
      Author

      DaydreamerJay 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Maladaptive Daydreaming is not the same thing as Dissociative Identity Disorder. DID is a personality disorder, for one. Maladaptive Daydreaming is not. That's like comparing bronchitis with lung cancer. They may both effect your breathing, but they do so in very different ways, and to very different extents. DID is at the other end of the dissociative spectrum and has to do with people losing time, having alternate personalities, switching etc. from childhood traumas that have caused them to need to dissociate completely from those traumas. Maladaptive Daydreamers don't have alters (Unless they happen to have DID too), they don't always develop Maladaptive Daydreaming due to childhood or even adult traumas. It has been around a long time, but it hasn't been recognized or understood or studied much and we're trying to change that.

    • DaydreamerJay profile image
      Author

      DaydreamerJay 4 years ago

      @anonymous: You don't need to experience a trauma to be a Maladaptive Daydreamer. It can simply be a way you've learned to cope with the stresses of life. You don't sound like an attention seeker. You sound like an intelligent person who is in pain. I think that media has definitely thrown at people that they should expect a 'perfect' love life and a fantasy romance to come true in reality when in reality relationships take a lot of work, that amazing 'in love' feeling is fleeting, and truly you don't need another to fulfill you as a person. I hope you're finding support and assurances now that you're not alone and there are many of us out here!

    • DaydreamerJay profile image
      Author

      DaydreamerJay 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I share that sentiment. I spent years wondering what it was that I was doing, thinking I was alone, and that it was just something that was wrong with me. It's a relief when you learn the truth!

    • DaydreamerJay profile image
      Author

      DaydreamerJay 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Try to discover what may be triggering you or causing you to turn to daydreaming so much now. Is it a habit, or just how you've learned to cope with normal life stresses? Or is it something you turn to because something has changed in your life recently? If you can find the reasons behind why, it can help you to heal from them or find better ways of coping. Finding others like joining a support group might help you with working through your stresses and thoughts on this.

    • DaydreamerJay profile image
      Author

      DaydreamerJay 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I'm really happy you've found that there is support out here for you and you're definitely not alone! Music is often a big trigger for many people and can be something that really fuels intense emotions. I think the worlds we create often do change over the years, along with our lives and ourselves. It's a natural process.

    • DaydreamerJay profile image
      Author

      DaydreamerJay 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I'm so glad you found out what you've been experiencing! We've all been there. For the longest time I thought there was something really wrong with me and that I was the only one.

    • DaydreamerJay profile image
      Author

      DaydreamerJay 4 years ago

      @anonymous: It can be done if you work through the issues that cause you to turn to daydreaming excessively. And I don't really feel comfortable recommending it, but people have had some luck with certain medications in helping them stave off their daydreams and enhance their focus on reality. This is an option if you're really struggling and unable to find relief with other options you've tried. You can look for a psychiatrist who knows something about Maladaptive Daydreaming discuss it with them.

    • DaydreamerJay profile image
      Author

      DaydreamerJay 4 years ago

      @anonymous: It can be very distracting to have such strong emotions for a fictional character. Such feelings will pass in time, however, and may come and go. I know it feels very intense and difficult to deal with. Try writing down your feelings. You can write it as a journal type entry, or just free random writing, or in a poetic or lyric form if you like, it might help you to get out some of your feelings while you're dealing with them.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Heyy thrr... Hixxx.... U know what i read everything u wrote and u know i think we r twins i mean srsly ir kist like me omg m feeling soo happy...u know wat .. Everything u imagine i imagine it as well everything the first dance and the actors and everything u know..m 17 now and my family they don't know about i mean i never ever shared it with anyone i dont know..i dont feel comfortable...i just lock my room door and wala daydreaming starts..ure amazing..

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Omggg heyyyyy.... U know samme here i feel sooo happy finding sumone like me..i also run and u jump around acting lile hunter in my room

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I am one but sometimes it bothers me cause in my dream I'm in love with a fictional character (Giroro from sgt frog btw) and I want to be in my daydream so bad that it causes me more stress and I can't help daydreaming and I loose sleep from it

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: This is not really the same as my brother and I are both 'maladaptive daydreamers' or compulsive fantasisers and neither of us were abused or suffered any trauma during our childhood. My brother was diagnosed with aspergers as a child and I've read a lot of aspies describing behaviour similar to the above.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hi Guys this is sanjeev..Im really telling you its real thing in my life also .stay awke with life..

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hi Guys this is sanjeev..Im really telling you its real thing in my life also .stay awke with life..

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Any way to get out of it completely?????

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      OMG..... I kept looking up mental disorders,... apparently i'm just a Maladaptive daydreamer! That only took me about 6 years to find out,.... now maybe i can actually tell someone what i do in almost all of my spare time when i'm listening to my ipod/ pacing/running all over the place!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Thank GOD. I thought i was completely lost and alone. Actually i have been having a parallel life in a world inside my head for some years may be 10 years i guess. This world/stories kept changing with respect to the changing phases in my life. It started like just some wandering thoughts while am traveling or sitting alone and later changed into a world inside my head with a few permanent characters and new story lines. Even though i have good social life am still becoming more and more obsessed with this unreal world and am afraid if i would lose the real one. Hearing music triggers it for me. And for the past 2 days i have been trying to turn down the triggers. Good to know that there is support out there.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Thank GOD. I thought i was completely lost and alone. Actually i have been having a parallel life in a world inside my head for some years may be 10 years i guess. This world/stories kept changing with respect to the changing phases in my life. It started like just some wandering thoughts while am traveling or sitting alone and later changed into a world inside my head with a few permanent characters and new story lines. Even though i have good social life am still becoming more and more obsessed with this unreal world and am afraid if i would lose the real one. Hearing music triggers it for me. And for the past 2 days i have been trying to turn down the triggers. Good to know that there is support out there.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Pls can some1 tell me how to get rid of this? At least now i know m not the only one! And this has a name pls pls can some1tell me how to get rid of this¤

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I found this site about 10 months ago. As the way it was described I felt I needed to stop. It was difficult at first but when I felt myself slipping into the behaviour I would find something else to do. I wish I knew years ago about this.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      im so glad i decided to research this. i have literally done this my whole life for as long as i can remember! ive always thought something was genuinely wrong with me and every year i promise to myself that ill stop (news years resolution and all) but i never do, and after reading what others have to say about their daydreams i feel a lot better about myself now. it drags me down a lot and though ive never been fired or shouted at for it, i know that my whole family know that i make loud noises and shout and talk to myself in my room but they don't know what im actually doing. its annoying because i imagine so much that it makes me wish that i was someone else sometimes. it helps with a lot of my life because when ever i want to 'escape' i just go into my sort of alternate universe, where ive created and 'borrowed' thousands of characters from films & tv but they always revolve around one female character. but not only do i create characters i sometimes think about myself, which is what drags me down a lot. I have an obsession with falling in love, i think its because i never have been in love, but when i hear certain songs it makes me really emotional (both angry and sad) because ill imagine these certain songs as my first dance at my wedding or me and my lover driving in the summer etc loads and loads and ive fixed it into my head that it wont happen. i don't know whether that last one has anything to do with this 'condition' (or whatever its classed as) but i think it is because i think about it where ever i am, whether its on a bus/train or even if im walking somewhere im always imagining really vivdly and detailed scenarios in my head. and i know i sound like an 'attention seeker' or whatever, but i don't care, when i overthink things (like the things i mentioned above) it makes me very very low and ive been self harming on-and-off since i was 13, i am now 20, and because i get so worked up over certain things and imagine/act out how different my life could be in my head i start becoming more and more upset with smaller things which makes me 'daydream' more. nothing that traumatic has happened to me the only thing that i can think of is my estranged relationship with my father but that has only been for the past 6 years, ive been 'daydreaming' for as long as i can remember.

      im sorry everyone, i know ive talked on and on and on but its nice to be able to let everything out, ive never ever ever talked about it to anyone and im so thankful that theres more than just me who experiences this, even writing it down so that people will know feels better than writing it in my diary so only i can see it. phew! relief!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I can't agree more. I thought it was just some fluke. I spent so much time, hours and hours--most of the day in dreaming. Whenever I see a movie or feel inadequate I go and put headphones and and jump up and down in my room and just imagine an intricate pseudo-reality. It's terribly addictive, and I know it is just compensating for feeling of inadequacy or some sort of self-created stimulant. I

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I never thought it was a problem until my grades started to fall rapidly. Instead of studying I instead decided to go into my dreams and meet 'myself ', the me I want to become in the future who is responsible, hardworking, has a well established business, is intelligent and beautiful. What triggers my dreams is music. I put my headphones on and go into a room where nobody is so that they can't hear me, and then I start pacing up and down while talking to myself. Every time after I finish dreaming I always cry because I'm so sick of it, the feeling of knowing that ur wasting ur time, life, energy and opportunities on seething that is in ur head. It hurts me a lot to know that I'm not gonna become someone of great value and if saddens me that I can't be like others who just work really hard and work to wards becoming what they want to become. For a few weeks now I have tried to focus on my school work but every time I just end up running back to my dreams. The scary part is that I actually have everything to become the future me I dream about, I have opened opportunities for myself to enable me to rise up. I have gone to the library to borrow books spent money on tools to build things and I even have puzzle books e.g sudoku. I have everything I need to become a robotics engineer and what I've realised is that this world of dreams is actually a blessing, there are so many gadgets that I've come up with that I definitely would not have come up with in real life. So what I've been doing is working with this strange world. I will continue to do it but at the same time find ways to make sure that I do not only build up this character in the dream world but also in the REAL world. I think that for people who have it, u should try to work with it instead of against it, try and build what ever u dream of ( as long as its not against the law e.g being a hit-man) , in the real world. You will find out that gradually u will start spending less time dreaming during the day because ur doing what u dream of. Try to associate it with an area of any work discipline e.g. An actress or comic writer ( if u keep dreaming about different characters). I am very happy that I found this site because I thought I was going insane. Lol. The most important thing to remember is that, every 1 has I believe a purpose in the REAL LIFE. YOU OLY GET TO LIVE FOR A LIMITED AMOUNT OF TIME. USE IT WISELY. I hope this makes sense ð

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Im glad I found this. I have been living a fantasy life since I was about 9 or 10 (im almost 30), It manly centres around myself as an actress named pippa, a character she plays on tv show and the life that pippa leads. Shes done everything that i wanted to do so now i feel that i have achieved these things and it causes me to quit everything i attempt in the real world. I also tend to attach her to real famous people that i admire and spend many hours daydreaming about them together. My daydreams are all consuming to the point where i have considered leaving my boyfriend because he is not someone that pipper would be with and quitting my job because its getting the way my/pippas life. I even tried killing off once but feared i would miss her to much. I feel stupid and chidish at times but I just cant let her go.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      This disorder is nothing new. It is called dissociative disorder. Dssociative identity disorder results from childhood abuse and traumas.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      @tinayania: Are you there? I saw you posted last night and am hoping you could talk..I have never spoken with anyone about this..I ma married with children..I work full time and am very busy with my family..I don't have time for this to interrupt my life..but I'm worried I do this because I'm not truly happy, depressed..I don't know..

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Hi..I am so glad to hear others have this..I would ove to talk with someone..I have done this as far as I can remember..I hve never..never shared it with anyone and as far as I know noting happened in my childhood to trigger this..I did lose a baby girl last year and it hit me hard.. i was 4 months pregnant..she would be my 5th child..I have 4 boys so I desperately wanted her..and for whatever reason..as usual I'm God's joke so I lost her. But after that, this became very intense and overwhelming. I want it to go away.

    • profile image

      tinayania 5 years ago

      WOW1 There is actually a name for this. For yeasrs i was worried that I was going crazy. I have day dreamed like this since I was a small child.

      I have noticed that now as an sdult there are 2 things which trigger it off. Stress and bordem. When I was bullied excessively at college, a guy saw me and he told everyone that I was "mad." For 10 years I have being trying to shrug off that label. I almost got fired at work because somebody caught me doing it so, I began wondering how I could control it and what caused it.

      I actually do enjoy writing stories and poetry and have found that I can implement these day dreams into a story and once I have done that. I never daydream about those chracters again. I have also found that when I am playing my instruments, I don't day dream. On the bus I have learnt to occupy myself at all times with books, magazines or my diary just so that I do not day dream on the bus. It is fun when I do it, it's a great form of escape but I really do have to work at getting my life back and trying to get rid of this " mad titie."

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I found that Social Anxiety research helps!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I'm wondering if I may have this. I've been having fantasies since I was little, I'm 16 now. They used to be crazy-they aren't so bad now. No more flying to wherever Star Wars is with my cousin in a rocket we made out of a trashcan (lol I'd forgotten about that until now c:) My *character* is me, but not me at the same time. Her name is different also, Riley (I really like that name).For several years now, I've had a huuge crush on a snowboarder, so they're pretty much about him now. I honestly think I'm in love with him now :/

      I've been meeting with a counselor, and I feel like I should tell her, because the fantasies are distracting (I'm doing an online High School this year) and they're distracting and I'm getting behind :(. I don't want my dad to make me go back to my old school! I think it's going to be really hard to tell her because a lot of times they are sexual aand that's embarrassing :( I've thought about emailing it to her, if she could read what's going on, so I didn't have to tell her...

      I don't really know why I did start. I was bullied a tiny bit (or at least from what I can remember) when I was little, when this would've been starting. I was bullied some in 7th grade, but 8th was horrible. Always, it was my name Jenny, so they messed with me because of the movie Forrest Gump. Two guys decided to take it so far as to fake propose to me... this went on pretty much all year. I told a teacher but she did nothing, she didn't seem to care.I never told my parents because it was so embarrassing. At the end of last year, I did have a few guys I didn't know start bothering me, this may have been what helped push me to try an online school.

      My other problem with telling that counselor is... I don't want to have to quit them. I know the fantasies are a problem, so part of me wants them gone, but most of me doesn't. Like I said before, I think I'm in love with my imaginary version of that guy, so that may be part of the problem.

      Oh yeah, when I was little and we'd have recess, I'd often "play" in my fantasy world, I'd walk along the wall. And outside I'd swing. That's my place where I fantasise the most, my swing. And in my room, my bed. Funny, on my swing they're random within a limit to the subjects of skate/snowboarding (for the most part) and in my room, usually just about my imaginary *boyfriend.* And a lot of times I get upset when I can't go swing. I guess my mind's all happy and excited, but when I can't I get sad and sometimes a little frustrated.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      From when I was about 8 I've been daydreaming about 2 characters, who have this crazy roller-coaster relationship. I have elaborate stories that I have made up and none of them are about me. Sometimes when I'm having a bad day I make up the situations I like the most or give me the best feeling. I would pace around my room, mouthing sentences of daydreams I was having, sometimes without noticing. I'm not even sure if I still do it now at 20 years old. I just fall into doing it. I even recorded myself once to see if I looked crazy. I thought it was normal to spend hours dreaming out my own world, until my roomie almost caught me doing it. Now I once pace as much, but it is hard for me to get out of bed when I'm daydreaming. I'll miss class sometimes and it's hard to focus. :(

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I have been doing this my entire life. My mother said I've been "rocking" on the couch since I could sit up! And since I can remember, I have been bouncing, literally HARD on the couch and daydreaming with music. I still do it to this day, for hours a day and I'm 19 years old. I am an artist, and I want to become a writer, I'm about to start college for it. I want to stop bouncing, because I feel like I'm wasting my life with it, but at the same time, I don't want to stop. I like the feeling of just, being in my own world where I can make up anyone and anything can happen. I feel calm when I'm in this state. That's why I want to become a writer, to write my stories down. Maybe one day I will write a novel. :)

    • DaydreamerJay profile image
      Author

      DaydreamerJay 5 years ago

      @anonymous: I'm really glad you shared that and you were able to get your feelings out. You don't need to experience a trauma to turn to daydreams as an outlet. Everyone has something they use to help them in life through the hard times, the stresses and anxieties, and to produce chemicals in the brain that can help make us feel better. Normal is subjective. That means what you think is normal, is normal. Your life may be more 'normal' to someone else compared to what they think their life is. You say you a happy life, a loving and caring family and friends, so that is a positive thing in your life! Sometimes people daydream excessively like we do many other things in excess, because there are areas of our life that aren't fullfilled or to have an escape from the every day stresses of life. A way of coping. But if you feel your life is really good and you feel it is emotionally satisfying and are generally happy apart from fighting maladaptive daydreaming, you may either be in a depression which needs to be seen to (You don't need to feel depressed/sad for the chemicals in your body to be off and causing symptoms of depression), or possibly it is a coping tool your body took on while you were developing as a child, due to any number of things. Even if you didn't experience a trauma, the human mind uses all different ways to cope with every day life stresses that everyone, even the happiest of people, have. It's possibly you no longer need daydreaming and it is just in the way now. You can look into support groups online, and therapy and even medication if it comes to that, to help you a great deal if you're wanting to try to stop your excessive daydreaming. I wish you the best!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      My daydream is about an anime character to which i really like and never want to stop think about him....i never add me in my dreams just think about the original charaters... i know my daydream has ruined my life but when i faced any difficulty , or really depress or sad about any unsolvable problem i just think about "My Dreamworld" ...where i feel really happy... happy in that limit in which i have never been in my real world...here i wanna clear i have not any past trauma or anything else.... in fact i feel really lucky that i have got everything in my life my lovely family,my caring frnds & teachers... all the thing which anyone require for a happy life....but don't know why God make me so unable to live a normal life... :( i am stuck with it & really don't want to leave it knowing that in this condition i can't imagine a good future.. :( but anyway today i m really happy that finally first time i could expressed my feelings & thoughts... which i still can't share with anyone..... :( sometimes things seem too little often have great impacts....... just like "My Dreams :)"..... in ..... "My Dreamworld :)"... :( .....